GIGA THE MOST EXTENSIVE
COLLECTION OF
QUOTATIONS
ON THE INTERNET
Google
Search GIGA
Loading
Home
Page
GIGA
Quotes
Biographical
Name Index
Chronological
Name Index
Topic
List
Reading
List
Site
Notes
Varying Hare
Books
Crossword
Solver
Anagram
Solver
Subanagram
Solver
TOPICS:          A   B   C   D   E   F   G   H   I   J   K   L   M   N   O   P   Q   R   S   T   U   V   W   X   Y   Z
PEOPLE:    #   A   B   C   D   E   F   G   H   I   J   K   L   M   N   O   P   Q   R   S   T   U   V   W   X   Y   Z


THUCYDIDES
Greek historian
(c. 471 BC - c. 400 BC)
  CHECK READING LIST (1)  

An avowal of poverty is a disgrace to no man; to make no effort to escape from it is indeed disgraceful.
      - [Poverty]

Boasting and bravado may exist in the breast even of the coward, if he is successful through a mere lucky hit; but a just contempt of an enemy can alone arise in those who feel that they are superior to their opponent by the prudence of their measures.
      - [Boasting]

For so remarkably perverse is the nature of man that he despises whoever courts him, and admires whoever will not bend before him.
      - [Perverseness]

For we both alike know that into the discussion of human affairs the question of justice enters only where the pressure of necessity is equal, and that the powerful exact what they can, and the weak grant what they must.
      - [Justice]

Ignorance is bold, and knowledge reserved.
      - [Ignorance]

Men's indignation, it seems, is more excited by legal wrong than by violent wrong; the first looks like being cheated by an equal, the second like being compelled by a superior.
      - [Injustice]

Of all manifestations of power, restraint impresses men most.
      - attributed to,
        in the Loeb editon of "Thucydides"
        [Power : Restraint]

The secret of happiness is freedom, and the secret of freedom, courage.
      - [Freedom]

To be an object of hatred and aversion to their contemporaries has been the usual fate of all those whose merit has raised them above the common level. The man who submits to the shafts of envy for the sake of noble objects pursues a judicious course for his own lasting fame. Hatred dies with its object, while merit soon breaks forth in full splendor, and his glory is handed down to posterity in never-dying strains.
      - [Envy]

We both alike know that into the discussion of human affairs the question of justice only enters where the pressure of necessity is equal; that the powerful exact what they can, and the weak grant what they must.
      - [Justice]

You are convinced by experience that very few things are brought to a successful issue by impetuous desire, but most by calm and prudent forethought.
      - [Impatience]

The whole earth is a sepulchre for famous men.
      - 2, 43 [Fame]


 WWW.GIGA-USA.COM     Back to Top of Page 
The GIGA name and the GIGA logo are trademarks registered in the United States Patent and Trademark Office.
GIGA-USA and GIGA-USA.COM are servicemarks of the domain owner.
Copyright © 1999-2013 John C. Shepard. All Rights Reserved.
Last Revised: 2013 March 15
Click > HERE < to report errors

Buy a good book from
Varying Hare Books