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WASHINGTON IRVING
American short story writer and essayist
(1783 - 1859)
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A father may turn his back on his child, brothers and sisters may become inveterate enemies, husbands may desert their wives, wives their husbands. But a mother's love endures through all; in good repute, in bad repute, in the face of the world's condemnation, a mother still loves on, and still hopes that her child may turn from his evil ways, and repent; still she remembers the infant smiles that once filled her bosom with rapture, the merry laugh, the joyful shout of his childhood, the opening promise of his youth; and she can never be brought to think him all unworthy.
      - [Mothers]

A kind heart is a fountain of gladness, making everything in its vicinity freshen into smiles.
      - [Kindness]

A sharp tongue is the only edge tool that grows keener with constant use.
      - [Tongue]

A tart temper never mellows with age; and a sharp tongue is the only edged tool that grows keener with constant use.
      - [Temper]

A woman is more considerate in affairs of love than a man; because love is more the study and business of her life.
      - [Love]

A woman's life is a history of the affections.
      - [Affection]

A woman's whole life is a history of the affections. The heart is her world; it is there her ambition strives for empire; it is there her avarice seeks for hidden treasures. She sends forth her sympathies on adventure, she embarks her whole soul in the traffic of affection; and, if shipwrecked, her case is hopeless, for it is a bankruptcy of the heart.
      - [Women]

After a man passes sixty, his mischief is mainly in his head.
      - [Old Age]

An inexhaustible good nature is one of the most precious gifts of heaven, spreading itself like oil over the troubled sea of thought, and keeping the mind smooth and equable in the roughest weather.
      - [Good Nature]

As the vine which has long twined its graceful foliage about the oak, and been lifted by it into sunshine, will, when the hardy plant is rifted by the thunderbolt, cling round it with its caressing tendrils, and bind up its shattered boughs; so it is beautifully ordered by Providence, that woman, who is the mere dependent and ornament of man in his happier hours, should be his stay and solace when smitten with sudden calamity; winding herself into the rugged recesses of his nature, tenderly supporting the drooping head, and binding up the broken heart.
      - [Women]

By a kind of fashionable discipline, the eye is taught to brighten, the lip to smile, and the whole countenance to emanate with the semblance of friendly welcome, while the bosom is unwarmed by a single spark of genuine kindness and good-will.
      - [Appearance]

Critics are a kind of freebooters in the republic of letters--who, like deer, goats and divers other graminivorous animals, gain subsistence by gorging upon buds and leaves of the young shrubs of the forest, thereby robbing them of their verdure, and retarding their progress to maturity.
      - [Critics]

Enthusiasts soon understand each other.
      - [Enthusiasm]

Every antique farm-house and moss-grown cottage is a picture.
      - [Landscape]

Every desire bears its death in its very gratification. Curiosity languishes under repeated stimulants, and novelties cease to excite and surprise, until at length we cannot wonder even at a miracle.
      - [Desire]

From its peaceful bosom spring none but fond regrets and tender recollections.
      - [Graves]

Happiness is reflective, like the light of heaven.
      - [Happiness]

He early acquired the magic of method, which of itself works wonders.
      - [Washington, George]

He had been indulging in fanciful speculations on spiritual essences until he had an ideal world of his own around him.
      - [Spirits]

He was a kind and thankful toad, whose heart dilated in proportion as his skin was filled with good cheer; and whose spirits rose with eating, as some men's do with drink.
      - [Gluttony]

He who thinks much says but little in proportion to his thoughts. He selects that language which will convey his ideas in the most explicit and direct manner. He tries to compress as much thought as possible into a few words. On the contrary, the man who talks everlastingly and promiscuously, who seems to have an exhaustless magazine of sound, crowds so many words into his thoughts that he always obscures, and very frequently conceals them.
      - [Style]

History is but a kind of Newgate calendar, a register of the crimes and miseries that man has inflicted on his fellow-man.
      - [History]

Honest good humor is the oil and wine of a merry meeting, and there is no jovial companionship equal to that where the jokes are rather small and laughter abundant.
      - [Good Humor]

How easy it is for one benevolent being to diffuse pleasure around him; and how truly is a kind heart a fountain of gladness, making everything in its vicinity to freshen into smiles!
      - [Kindness]

How idle a boast, after all, is the immortality of a name! Time is ever silently turning over his pages; we are too much engrossed by the story of the present to think of the character and anecdotes that gave interest to the past; and each age is a volume thrown aside and forgotten.
      - [Fame]


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