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APPAREL
 << Prev Page    Displaying page 3 of 3
[ Also see Appearance Cleanliness Clothes Display Dress Fashion Foppery Hatters Jewels Shoemaking Tailors Vanity ]

Fare you well, my lord, and believe this of me: there can be no kernel in this light nut; the soul of this man is his clothes. Trust him not in matter of heavy consequence.
      - William Shakespeare,
        All's Well That Ends Well
         (Lafew at II, v)

(Cloten:) Thou villain base,
  Know'st me not by my clothes?
    (Guiderius:) No, nor thy tailor, rascal,
      Who is thy grandfather. He made those clothes,
        Which, as it seems, make thee.
      - William Shakespeare, Cymbeline
         (Cloten & Guiderius at IV, ii)

Costly thy habit as thy purse can buy,
  But not expressed in fancy; rich, not gaudy,
    For the apparel oft proclaims the man,
      And they in France of the best rank and station
        Are of a most select and generous chief in that.
      - William Shakespeare,
        Hamlet Prince of Denmark
         (Polonius at I, iii)

Through tattered clothes small vices do appear;
  Robes and furred gowns hide all. Plate sin with gold,
    And the strong lance of justice hurtless breaks;
      Arm it in rags, a pigmy's straw doth pierce it.
      - William Shakespeare, King Lear
         (King Lear at IV, vi)

See where she comes, apparelled like the spring,
  Graces her subjects, and her thoughts the king
    Of every virtue gives renown to men!
      - William Shakespeare,
        Pericles Prince of Tyre
         (Pericles at I, i)

So tedious is this day
  As is the night before some festival
    To an impatient child that hath new robes
      And may not wear them.
      - William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet
         (Juliet at III, ii)

And now, my honey love,
  Will we return unto thy father's house
    And revel it as bravely as the best,
      With silken coats and caps and golden rings,
        With ruffs and cuffs and farthingales and things;
          With scarfs and fans and double change of brav'ry,
            With amber bracelets, beads, and all this knav'ry.
      - William Shakespeare,
        The Taming of the Shrew
         (Petruchio at IV, iii)

He will come to her in yellow stockings, and 'tis a color she abhors, and cross-gartered, a fashion she detests; and he will smile upon her, which will now be so unsuitable to her disposition, being addicted to a melancholy as she is, that it cannot but turn him into a notable contempt.
      - William Shakespeare,
        Twelfth Night, or, What You Will
         (Maria at II, v)

Her cap, far whiter than the driven snow,
  Emblem right meet of decency does yield.
      - William Shenstone, The Schoolmistress
         (st. 6)

Now old Tredgortha's dead and gone,
  We ne'er shall see him more;
    He used to wear an old grey coat,
      All buttoned down before.
      - Rupert Simms, Bibliotheca Stafforiensis

She wears her clothes as if they were thrown on her with a pitchfork.
      - Jonathan Swift, Polite Conversation
         (dialogue I)

Attired to please herself: no gems of any kind
  She wore, nor aught of borrowed gloss in Nature's stead;
    And, then her long, loose hair flung round her head
      Fell carelessly behind.
      - Terence (Publius Terentius Afer),
        Self-Tormentor (act II, sc. 2)

So for thy spirit did devise
  Its Maker seemly garniture,
    Of its own essence parcel pure.--
      From grave simplicities a dress,
        And reticent demureness,
          And love encinctured with reserve;
            Which the woven vesture would subserve.
              For outward robes in their ostents
                Should show the soul's habiliments.
                  Therefore I say,--Thou'rt fair even so,
                    But better Fair I use to know.
      - Francis Thompson, Gilded Gold (st. 2)

O fair undress, best dress! it checks no vein,
  But every flowing limb in pleasure drowns,
    And heightens ease with grace.
      - James Thomson (1), Castle of Indolence
         (canto I, st. 26)

Her polish'd limbs,
  Veil'd in a simple robe, their best attire;
    Beyond the pomp of dress; for Loveliness
      Needs not the foreign aid of ornament,
        But is, when unadorn'd the most.
      - James Thomson (1), Seasons--Autumn
         (l. 202)

Distrust any enterprise that requires new clothes.
      - Henry David Thoreau

I say, beware of all enterprises that require new clothes, and not rather a new wearer of clothes.
      - Henry David Thoreau

She's adorned
  Amply, that in her husband's eye looks lovely,--
    The truest mirror that an honest wife
      Can see her beauty in!
      - John Tobin, The Honeymoon (act III, sc. 4)

There is new strength, repose of mind, and inspiration in fresh apparel.
      - Ella Wheeler Wilcox

With an evening coat and a white tie, anybody, even a stockbroker, can gain a reputation for being civilized.
      - Oscar Wilde (Oscar Fingal O'Flahertie Wills Wilde)

I tend to wear outfits that match the walls.
      - Debra Winger

How his eyes languish! how his thoughts adore
  That painted coat, which Joseph never wore!
    He shows, on holidays, a sacred pin,
      That touch'd the ruff, that touched Queen Bess' chin.
      - Edward Young, Love of Fame
         (satire IV, l. 119)

Their feet through faithless leather met the dirt,
  And oftener chang'd their principles than shirt.
      - Edward Young, To Mr. Pope
         (epistle I, l. 283)

Dress does not give knowledge.
  [Sp., La ropa no da ciencia.]
      - Tomas de Yriarte (Iriarte), Fables (XXVII)

All women's dresses, in every age and country, are merely variations on the eternal struggle between the admitted desire to dress and the unadmitted desire to undress.
      - Lin Yutang


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