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ARCHITECTURE
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[ Also see Art Building Carpentry Engineering House Masons Occupations Sculpture Structure ]

To build is to be robbed.
      - Samuel Johnson (a/k/a Dr. Johnson) ("The Great Cham of Literature")

Grandeur * * * * * consists in form, and not in size: and to the eye of the philosopher, the curve drawn on a paper two inches long, is just as magnificent, just as symbolic of divine mysteries and melodies, as when embodied in the span of some cathedral roof.
      - Charles Kingsley

Grandeur . . . consists in form, and not in size: and to the eye of the philosopher, the curve drawn on a paper two inches long, is just as magnificent, just as symbolic of divine mysteries and melodies, as when embodied in the span of some cathedral roof.
      - Charles Kingsley,
        Prose Idylls--My Winter Garden

The architect
  Built his great heart into these sculptured stones,
    And with him toiled his children, and their lives
      Were builded, with his own, into the walls,
        As offerings unto God.
      - Henry Wadsworth Longfellow,
        Christus--The Golden Legend
         (pt. III, In the Cathedral)

Ah, to build, to build!
  That is the noblest of all the arts.
      - Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Michael Angelo
         (pt. I, II, l. 54)

In the elder days of Art,
  Builders wrought with greatest care
    Each minute and unseen part;
      For the gods see everywhere.
      - Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, The Builders
         (st. 5)

There will never be great architects or great architecture without great patrons.
      - Edwin Lutyens, in "Country Life" magazine

A fabric huge
  Rose, like an exhalation.
      - John Milton

Anon, out of the earth a fabric huge
  Rose, like an exhalation.
      - John Milton, Paradise Lost (bk. I, l. 710)

Nor did there want
  Cornice or frieze with bossy sculpture graven.
      - John Milton, Paradise Lost (bk. I, l. 715)

The hasty multitude
  Admiring enter'd, and the work some praise,
    And some the architect: his hand was known
      In heaven by many a tower'd structure high,
        Where scepter'd angels held their residence,
          And sat as princes.
      - John Milton, Paradise Lost (bk. I, l. 730)

Architecture is the printing-press of all ages, and gives a history of the state of the society in which it was erected, from the cromlech of the Druids to those toy-shops of royal bad taste.--Carlton House and the Brighton Pavilion. The Tower and Westminster Abbey are glorious pages in the history of time, and tell the story of an iron despotism, and the cowardice of unlimited power.
      - Lady Sydney Morgan

Histories in blazonry and poems in stone.
      - Ouida (pseudonym of Marie Louise de la Ramee)

Thus when we view some well-proportion'd dome, . . . .
  No single parts unequally surprise,
    All comes united to th' admiring eyes.
      - Alexander Pope, Essay on Criticism
         (pt. II, l. 47)

We must note carefully what distinction there is between a healthy and a diseased love of change; for as it was in healthy love of change that the Gothic architecture rose, it was partly in consequence of diseased love of change that it was destroyed.
      - John Ruskin

It was stated, . . . that the value of architecture depended on two distinct characters:--the one, the impression it receives from human power; the other, the image it bears of the natural creation.
      - John Ruskin,
        Seven Lamps of Architecture--The Lamp of Beauty

Better the rudest work that tells a story or records a fact, than the richest without meaning. There should not be a single ornament put upon great civic buildings, without some intellectual intention.
      - John Ruskin,
        Seven Lamps of Architecture--The Lamp of Memory

I would have, then, our ordinary dwelling-houses built to last, and built to be lovely; as rich and full of pleasantness as may be within and without: . . . with such differences as might suit and express each man's character and occupation, and partly his history.
      - John Ruskin,
        Seven Lamps of Architecture--The Lamp of Memory

Therefore when we build, let us think that we build (public edifices) forever. Let us not be for present delight, nor for present use alone, let it be for such work as our descendants will thank us for, and let us think, as we lay stone on stone, that a time is to come when those stones will be held sacred because our hands have touched them, and that men will say as they look upon the labor and wrought substance of them, "See! this our fathers did for us."
      - John Ruskin,
        Seven Lamps of Architecture--The Lamp of Memory

We require from buildings, as from men, two kinds of goodness: first, the doing their practical duty well: then that they be graceful and pleasing in doing it; which last is itself another form of duty.
      - John Ruskin, The Stones of Venice
         (vol. I, ch. II)

Architecture is the work of nations.
      - John Ruskin, True and Beautiful--Sculpture

No person who is not a great sculptor or painter, can be an architect. If he is not a sculptor or painter, he can only be a builder.
      - John Ruskin, True and Beautiful--Sculpture

Ornamentation is the principal part of architecture, considered as a subject of fine art.
      - John Ruskin, True and Beautiful--Sculpture

Towers in a modern town are a frill and a survival; they seem like the raised hands of the various churches, afraid of being overlooked, and saying to the forgetful public, Here I am! Or perhaps they are rival lightning rods, saying to the emanations of divine grace, "Please strike here!"
      - George Santayana

Architecture in general is frozen music.
      - Friedrich Wilhelm Joseph von Schelling,
        Philosophie der Kunst


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