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BEAUTY
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[ Also see Appearance Art Blushes Charm Cosmetics Countenance Deformity Dimples Display Eyes Face Grace Hair Ornament Physiognomy Sexuality Sublimity Ugliness Women ]

Beauty is a witch, against whose charms faith melteth into blood.
      - William Shakespeare

Beauty itself doth itself persuade the eyes of men without an orator.
      - William Shakespeare

Beauty lives with kindness.
      - William Shakespeare

Her beauty hangs upon the cheek of night, as a rich jewel in an Ethiop's ear.
      - William Shakespeare

For her own person,
  It beggar'd all description: she did lie
    In her pavilion, cloth-of-gold of tissue,
      O'erpicturing that Venus where we see
        The fancy outwork nature.
      - William Shakespeare, Antony and Cleopatra
         (Enobarbus at II, ii)

Beauty provoketh thieves sooner than gold.
      - William Shakespeare, As You Like It
         (Rosalind at I, iii)

Good Lord Boyet, my beauty, though but mean,
  Needs not the painted flourish of your praise:
    Beauty is bought by judgment of the eye,
      Not uttered by base sale of chapman's tongues.
      - William Shakespeare, Love's Labor's Lost
         (Princess of France at II, i)

See, see--my beauty will be saved by merit.
      - William Shakespeare, Love's Labor's Lost
         (Princess at IV, i)

A withered hermit, five-score winters worn,
  Might shake off fifty, looking in her eye:
    Beauty doth varnish age as if new-born,
      And gives the crutch the cradle's infancy.
        O, 'tis the sun that maketh all things shine!
      - William Shakespeare, Love's Labor's Lost
         (Berowne at IV, iii)

Therefore all hearts in love use their own tongues;
  Let every eye negotiate for itself
    And trust no agent; for beauty is a witch
      Against whose charms faith melteth into blood.
      - William Shakespeare,
        Much Ado About Nothing
         (Claudio at II, i)

Yet I'll not shed her blood,
  Nor scar that whiter skin of hers than snow,
    And smooth as monumental alabaster.
      - William Shakespeare,
        Othello the Moor of Venice
         (Othello at V, ii)

O, she doth teach the torches to burn bright!
  It seems she hangs upon the cheek of night
    As a rich jewel in an Ethiop's ear--
      Beauty too rich for use, for earth too dear!
      - William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet
         (Romeo at I, v)

But soft! What light through yonder window breaks?
  It is the East, and Juliet is the sun.
    Arise, fair sun, and kill the envious moon,
      Who is already sick and pale with grief
        That thou her maid art far more fair than she.
          Be not her maid, since she is envious.
            Her vestal livery is but since and green,
              And none but fools fo wear it. Cast it off.
                It is my lady; O, it is my love!
                  O that she knew she were!
      - William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet
         (Romeo at II, i)

O, no, a lanthorn, slaught'red youth,
  For here lies Juliet, and her beauty makes
    This vault a feasting presence full of light.
      - William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet
         (Romeo at V, iii)

O, how much more doth beauty beauteous seem
  By that sweet ornament which truth doth give:
    The rose looks fair, but fairer we it deem
      For that sweet odor which doth in it live.
      - William Shakespeare, Sonnet LIV

Of nature's gifts thou mayst with lilies boast
  And with the half-blown rose.
      - William Shakespeare,
        The Life and Death of King John
         (Constance at III, i)

Heaven bless thee,
  Thou hast the sweetest face I ever looked on.
    Sir, as I have a soul, she is an angel;
      Our king has all the Indies in his arms,
        And more, and richer, when he strains that lady.
          I cannot blame his conscience.
      - William Shakespeare,
        The Life of King Henry the Eighth
         (Gentleman at IV, i)

A good leg will fall, a straight back will stoop, a black beard will turn white, a curled pate will grow bald, a fair face will wither, a full eye will wax hollow; but a good heart, Kate, is the sun and the moon; or rather, the sun, and not the moon, for it shines brights and never changes, but keeps his course truly.
      - William Shakespeare,
        The Life of King Henry the Fifth
         (King Henry at V, ii)

Beauty is but a vain and doubtful good;
  A shining gloss that vadeth suddenly;
    A flower that dies when first it 'gins to bud;
      A brittle glass that's broken presently;
        A doubtful good, a gloss, a glass, a flower,
          Lost, vaded, broken, dead within an hour.
      - William Shakespeare,
        The Passionate Pilgrim (XIII, l. 1),
        a poem of doubtful authenticity

Say that she frown, I'll say she looks as clear
  As morning roses newly washed with dew.
      - William Shakespeare,
        The Taming of the Shrew
         (Petruchio at II, i)

There's nothing ill can dwell in such a temple.
  If the ill spirit have so fair a house,
    Good things will strive to dwell with't.
      - William Shakespeare, The Tempest
         (Miranda at I, ii)

'Tis beauty truly blent, whose red and white
  Nature's own sweet and cunning hand laid on.
      - William Shakespeare,
        Twelfth Night, or, What You Will
         (Viola at I, v)

Beauty is all very well at first sight; but whoever looks at it when it has been in the house three days?
      - George Bernard Shaw, Man and Superman

A lovely lady, garmented in light
  From her own beauty.
      - Percy Bysshe Shelley, The Witch of Atlas
         (st. 5)

Beauty can give an edge to the bluntest sword.
      - Sir Philip Sidney (Sydney)


Displaying page 14 of 17 for this topic:   << Prev  Next >>  1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 [14] 15 16 17

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