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MAN
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[ Also see Acting Action Being Brotherhood Character Evolution Gentlemen Humanity Husbands Inhumanity Life Manhood Mankind Matrimony Men Middle Age Mortality People Public Society Women World ]

Man, living, feeling man is the easy prey of the powerful present.
  [Ger., Der Mensch ist, der lebendig fuhlende,
    Der leichte Raub des macht'gen Augenblicks.]
      - Johann Christoph Friedrich von Schiller,
        Die Jungfrau von Orleans (III, 4, 54)

"How poor a thing is man!" alas 'tis true,
  I'd half forgot it when I chanced on you.
      - Johann Christoph Friedrich von Schiller,
        The Moral Poet

The man, whom I call deserving the name, is one whose thoughts and exertions are for others rather than himself.
      - Sir Walter Scott

But we all are men,
  In our own natures frail; and capable
    Of our flesh, few are angels.
      - William Shakespeare

Do you know what a man is? Are not birth, beauty, good shape, discourse, manhood, learning, gentleness, virtue, youth, liberality, and such like, the spice and salt that season a man?
      - William Shakespeare

He was a man, take him for all in all,
  I shall not look upon his like again.
      - William Shakespeare

You can play no part but Pyramus; for Pyramus is a sweet-faced man, a proper man as one shall see in a summer's day, a most lovely gentlemanlike man.
      - William Shakespeare,
        A Midsummer Night's Dream
         (Bottom at I, ii)

Men have died from time to time, and worms have eaten them, but not for love.
      - William Shakespeare, As You Like It
         (Rosalind at IV, i)

'A was a man, take him for all in all,
  I shall not look upon his like again.
      - William Shakespeare,
        Hamlet Prince of Denmark
         (Hamlet at I, ii)

What a piece of work is a man, how noble in reason, how infinite in faculties; in form and moving how express and admirable, in action how like an angel, in apprehension how like a god: the beauty of the world, the paragon of animals! And yet to me what is this quintessence of dust? Man delights not me--nor woman neither, though by your smiling you seem to say so.
      - William Shakespeare,
        Hamlet Prince of Denmark
         (Hamlet at II, ii)

Give me that man
  That is not passion's slave, and I will wear him
    In my heart's core, ay, in my heart of heart,
      As I do thee.
      - William Shakespeare,
        Hamlet Prince of Denmark
         (Hamlet at III, ii)

O, there be players that I have seen play, and heard others praise, and that highly (not to speak it profanely), that neither having th' accent of Christians, nor the gait of Christian, pagan, nor man, have so strutted and bellowed that I have thought some of nature's journeymen had made men, and not made them well, they imitated humanity so abominably.
      - William Shakespeare,
        Hamlet Prince of Denmark
         (Hamlet at III, ii)

What is a man,
  If his chief good and market of his time
    Be but to sleep and feed? A beast, no more.
      Sure he that made us with such large discourse,
        Looking before and after, gave us not
          That capability and godlike reason
            To fust in us unused.
      - William Shakespeare,
        Hamlet Prince of Denmark
         (Hamlet at IV, iv)

Men at some time are masters of their fates.
  The fault, dear Brutus, is not is our stars,
    But in ourselves, that we are underlings.
      - William Shakespeare, Julius Caesar
         (Cassius at I, ii)

Men at some time are masters of their fates.
      - William Shakespeare, Julius Caesar
         (Cassius at I, ii)

What, shall one of us,
  That struck for the foremost man of all this world
    But for supporting robbers--shall we now
      Contaminate our fingers with base bribes,
        And sell the mighty space of our large honors
          For so much trash as may be grasped thus?
      - William Shakespeare, Julius Caesar
         (Brutus at IV, iii)

His life was gentle, and the elements
  So mixed in him that Nature might stand up
    And say to all the world, 'This was a man!'
      - William Shakespeare, Julius Caesar
         (Antony at V, v)

Are you good men and true?
      - William Shakespeare,
        Much Ado About Nothing
         (Dogberry at III, iii)

A man, young lady! lady, such a man
  As all the world--why he's a man of wax.
      - William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet
         (Nurse at I, iii)

What the declined is
  He shall as soon read in the eyes of others
    As feel in his own fall; for men, like butterflies,
      Show not their mealy wings but to the summer,
        And not a man, for being simply man,
          Hath any honor, but honor for those honors
            That are without him, as place, riches, and favor,
              Prizes of accident as oft as merit;
                Which when they fall, as being slippery standers,
                  The love that leaned on them as slippery too,
                    Doth one pluck down another, and together
                      Die in the fall.
      - William Shakespeare,
        The History of Troilus and Cressida
         (Achilles at III, iii)

Every man is odd.
      - William Shakespeare,
        The History of Troilus and Cressida
         (Menelaus at IV, v)

This is the state of man: to-day he puts forth
  The tender leaves of hope; to-morrow blossoms
    And bears his blushing honours thick upon him;
      The third day comes a frost, a killing frost,
        And, when he thinks, good easy man, fully surely
          His greatness is a-ripening, nips his root,
            And then he falls as I do.
      - William Shakespeare,
        The Life of King Henry the Eighth
         (Wolsey at III, ii)

Men that make
  Envy and crooked malice nourishment
    Dare bite the best.
      - William Shakespeare,
        The Life of King Henry the Eighth
         (Cranmer at V, iii)

I wonder men dare trust themselves with men.
      - William Shakespeare,
        The Life of Timon of Athens
         (Apemantus at I, ii)

God made him, and therefore let him pass for a man.
      - William Shakespeare,
        The Merchant of Venice (Portia at I, ii)


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