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VIRTUE
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[ Also see Character Chastity Conscience Crime Evil Excellence Goodness Holiness Innocence Integrity Knavery Merit Morality Purity Religion Right Righteousness Sin Truth Vice Wisdom Worth ]

Virtue is uniform, conformable to reason, and of unvarying consistency; nothing can be added to it that can make it more than virtue; nothing can be taken from it, and the name of virtue be left.
      - Cicero (Marcus Tullius Cicero) (often called "Tully" for short)

That which leads us to the performance of duty by offering pleasure as its reward, is not virtue, but a deceptive copy and imitation of virtue.
  [Lat., Nam quae voluptate, quasi mercede aliqua, ad officium impellitur, ea non est virtus sed fallax imitatio simulatioque virtutis.]
      - Cicero (Marcus Tullius Cicero) (often called "Tully" for short),
        Academici (IV, 46)

Honor is the reward of virtue.
  [Lat., Honor est premium virtutis.]
      - Cicero (Marcus Tullius Cicero) (often called "Tully" for short),
        Brutus (LXXXI)

Fewer possess virtue, than those who wish us to believe that they possess it.
  [Lat., Virtute enim ipsa non tam multi praediti esse, quam videri volunt.]
      - Cicero (Marcus Tullius Cicero) (often called "Tully" for short),
        De Amicitia (XXVI)

The more virtuous any man is, the less easily does he suspect others to be vicious.
  [Lat., Nam ut quisque est vir optimus, ita difficillime esse alios improbos suspicatur.]
      - Cicero (Marcus Tullius Cicero) (often called "Tully" for short),
        Epistoloe Ad Fratrem (I, 1)

It is the stain and disgrace of the age to envy virtue, and to be anxious to crush the very flower of dignity.
  [Lat., Est haec saeculi labes quaedam et macula virtuti invidere, velle ipsum florem dignitatis infringere.]
      - Cicero (Marcus Tullius Cicero) (often called "Tully" for short),
        Gratio Pro Lucio Cornelio Balbo (VI)

In the approach to virtue there are many steps.
  [Lat., In virtute sunt multi adscensus.]
      - Cicero (Marcus Tullius Cicero) (often called "Tully" for short),
        Oratio Pro Cnoeo Plancio (XXV)

Virtue is a habit of the mind, consistent with nature and moderation and reason.
      - Cicero (Marcus Tullius Cicero) (often called "Tully" for short),
        Rhetorical Invention (bk. II, sc. LIII)

Virtue is indeed its own reward.
  [Lat., Ipsa quidem pretium virtus sibi.]
      - Claudian (Claudianus),
        De Consulatu Mallii--Theodorii Panegyris
         (V, I)

Virtue when concealed is a worthless thing.
  [Lat., Vile latens virtus.]
      - Claudian (Claudianus),
        De Quarto Consulatu Honorii Augusti Panegyris
         (222)

Well may your heart believe the truths I tell;
  'Tis virtue makes the bliss, where'er we dwell.
      - Wilkie (William) Collins, Eclogue I
         (l. 5, Selim)

Sincerely to aspire after virtue is to gain her, and zealously to labor after her wages is to receive them.
      - Charles Caleb Colton

There is but one pursuit in life which it is in the power of all to follow, and of all to attain. It is subject to no disappointments, since he that perseveres makes every difficulty an advancement and every contest a victory; and this is the pursuit of virtue.
      - Charles Caleb Colton

Virtue, without talent, is a coat of mail without a sword; it may indeed defend the wearer, but will not enable him to protect his friend.
      - Charles Caleb Colton

Is any one able for one day to apply his strength to virtue? I have not seen the case in which his strength would be sufficient.
      - Confucius

The superior man thinks always of virtue; the common man thinks of comfort.
      - Confucius

To be able under all circumstances to practise five things constitutes perfect virtue: these five are gravity, generosity of soul, sincerity, earnestness, and kindness.
      - Confucius

Virtue is like the polar star, which keeps its place, and all stars turn towards it.
      - Confucius

Virtue is more to man than either water or fire. I have seen men die from treading on water and fire, but I have never seen a man die from treading the course of virtue.
      - Confucius

Is virtue a thing remote? I wish to be virtuous, and lo! virtue is at hand.
      - Confucius, Analects (bk. I, ch. IV)

Virtue is not left to stand alone. He who practices it will have neighbors.
      - Confucius, Analects (bk. IV, ch. XXV)

All great virtues become great men.
  [Fr., Toutes grandes vertus conviennent aux grands hommes.]
      - Pierre Corneille,
        Notes de Corneille par La Rochefoucauld

Good sense, good health, good conscience, and good fame,--all these belong to virtue, and all prove that virtue has a title to your love.
      - William Cowper

The only amarantine flower on earth
  Is virtue.
      - William Cowper, Task (bk. III, l. 268)

And he by no uncommon lot
  Was famed for virtues he had not.
      - William Cowper, To the Rev. William Bull
         (l. 19)


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