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CICERO (MARCUS TULLIUS CICERO) (OFTEN CALLED "TULLY" FOR SHORT)
Roman philosopher, statesman and orator
(106 BC - 43 BC)
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There is no grief which time does not lessen and soften.
  [Lat., Nullus dolor est quem non longinquitas temporis minuat ac molliat.]
      - Epistles (IV, 5) [Grief]

There is no place more delightful than one's own fireside.
  [Lat., Nullus est locus domestica sede jucundior.]
      - Epistles (IV, 8) [Home]

All places are filled with fools.
  [Lat., Stultorum plenea sunt omnia.]
      - Epistles (IX, 22) [Folly]

There is nothing better fitted to delight the reader than change of circumstances and varieties of fortune.
  [Lat., Nihil est aptius delectationem lectoris quam temporum varietates fortunaeque vicissitudines.]
      - Epistles (V, 12) [Change]

The consciousness of good intention is the greatest solace of misfortunes.
  [Lat., Conscientia rectae voluntatis maxima consolatio est rerum incommodarum.]
      - Epistles (V, 4) [Misfortune]

The comfort derived from the misery of others is slight.
  [Lat., Levis est consolatio ex miseria aliorum.]
      - Epistles (VI, 3) [Misery]

To stumble twice against the same stone, is a proverbial disgrace.
  [Lat., Culpa enim illa, bis ad eundem, vulgari reprehensa proverbio est.]
      - Epistles (X, 20) [Folly]

To freemen, threats are impotent.
  [Lat., Nulla enim minantis auctoritas apud liberos est.]
      - Epistles (XI, 3) [Freedom]

No well-informed person has declared a change of opinion to be inconstancy.
  [Lat., Nemo doctus unquam mutationem consilii inconstantiam dixit esse.]
      - Epistoloe ad Atticum (bk. XVI, 8)
        [Consistency]

To the sick, while there is life there is hope.
  [Lat., Aegroto dum anima est, spes est.]
      - Epistoloe ad Atticum (IX, 10)
        [Hope : Proverbs]

Man is his own worst enemy.
  [Lat., Nihil inimicius quam sibi ipse.]
      - Epistoloe ad Atticum (X, 12a, sec. III)
        [Enemies]

To-morrow will give some food for thought.
  [Lat., Aliquod crastinus dies ad cogitandum dabit.]
      - Epistoloe Ad Atticum (XV, 8) [Tomorrow]

No sensible man (among the many things that have been written on this kind) ever imputed inconsistency to another for changing his mind.
  [Lat., Nemo doctus unquam (multa autem de hoc genere scripta sunt) mutationem consili inconstantiam dixit esse.]
      - Epistoloe ad Atticum (XVI, 7, 3) [Change]

Men ought to be most annoyed by the sufferings which come from their own faults.]
  [Lat., Ea molestissime ferre homines debent quae ipsorum culpa ferenda sunt.]
      - Epistoloe ad Fratrem (I, 1) [Faults]

The more virtuous any man is, the less easily does he suspect others to be vicious.
  [Lat., Nam ut quisque est vir optimus, ita difficillime esse alios improbos suspicatur.]
      - Epistoloe Ad Fratrem (I, 1) [Virtue]

It is the stain and disgrace of the age to envy virtue, and to be anxious to crush the very flower of dignity.
  [Lat., Est haec saeculi labes quaedam et macula virtuti invidere, velle ipsum florem dignitatis infringere.]
      - Gratio Pro Lucio Cornelio Balbo (VI)
        [Virtue]

When they hold their tongues they cry out.
  [Lat., Cum tacent clamant.]
      - In Catilinam (1, 8) [Silence]

Ye immortal gods! where in the world are we?
  [Lat., O dii immortales! ubinam gentium sumus?]
      - In Catilinam (I, 4) [Gods]

There is no praise in being upright, where no one can, or tries to corrupt you.
  [Lat., Nulla est laus ibi esse integrum, ubi nemo est, qui aut possit aut conetur rumpere.]
      - In Verrem (II, 1, 16) [Honor]

Everything that thou reprovest in another, thou must most carefully avoid in thyself.
  [Lat., Omnia quae vindicaris in altero, tibi ipsi vehementer fugienda sunt.]
      - In Verrem (II, 3, 2) [Honesty]

For as the law is set over the magistrate, even so are the magistrates set over the people. And therefore, it may be truly said, "that the magistrate is a speaking law, and the law is a silent magistrate."
      - On the Laws (bk. III, I) [Law]

The forehead is the gate of the mind.
  [Lat., Frons est animi janua.]
      - Oratio De Provinciis Consularibus (XI)
        [Mind]

The hope of impunity is the greatest inducement to do wrong.
  [Lat., Maxima illecebra est peccandi impunitatis spes.]
      - Oratio Pro Animo Milone (XVI) [Hope]

The law is silent during war.
  [Lat., Silent leges inter arma.]
      - Oratio Pro Annio Milone (IV) [War]

There is no more sure tie between friends than when they are united in their objects and wishes.
  [Lat., Neque est ullum certius amicitiae vinculum, quam consensus et societas consiliorum et voluntatum.,]
      - Oratio Pro Cnoeo Plancio (II) [Unity]


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