GIGA THE MOST EXTENSIVE
COLLECTION OF
QUOTATIONS
ON THE INTERNET
Google
Search GIGA
Loading
Home
Page
GIGA
Quotes
Biographical
Name Index
Chronological
Name Index
Topic
List
Reading
List
Site
Notes
Varying Hare
Books
Crossword
Solver
Anagram
Solver
Subanagram
Solver
TOPICS:          A   B   C   D   E   F   G   H   I   J   K   L   M   N   O   P   Q   R   S   T   U   V   W   X   Y   Z
PEOPLE:    #   A   B   C   D   E   F   G   H   I   J   K   L   M   N   O   P   Q   R   S   T   U   V   W   X   Y   Z


HOMER ("SMYRNS OF CHIOS")
Greek poet
(fl. 750 BC or earlier)
  CHECK READING LIST (2)    << Prev Page    Displaying page 4 of 10    Next Page >> 

A generous friendship no cold medium knows,
  Burns with one love, with one resentment glows;
    One should our interests and our passions be,
      My friend must hate the man that injures me.
      - The Iliad (bk. IX, l. 725),
        (Pope's translation) [Friendship]

He spake, and into every heart his words
  Carried new strength and courage.
      - The Iliad (bk. V, l. 586),
        (Bryant's translation) [Speech]

O friends, be men, and let your hearts be strong,
  And let no warrior in the heat of fight
    Do what may bring him shame in others' eyes;
      For more of those who shrink from shame are safe
        Than fall in battle, while with those who flee
          Is neither glory nor reprieve from death.
      - The Iliad (bk. V, l. 663),
        (Bryant's translation) [Courage]

One who journeying
  Along a way he knows not, having crossed
    A place of drear extent, before him sees
      A river rushing swiftly toward the deep,
        And all its tossing current white with foam,
          And stops and turns, and measures back his way.
      - The Iliad (bk. V, l. 749),
        (Bryant's translation) [Traveling]

Whose little body lodged a mighty mind.
      - The Iliad (bk. V, l. 999),
        (Pope's translation) [Mind]

Axylos, Teuthranos's son that dwelt in stablished Arisbe; a man of substance dear to his fellows; for his dwelling was by the road-side and he entertained all men.
      - The Iliad (bk. VI, l. 12),
        (Lang's translation) [Hospitality]

He held his seat; a friend to human race.
      - The Iliad (bk. VI, l. 18),
        (Pope's translation) [Humanity]

Like leaves on trees the race of man is found,--
  Now green in youth, now withering on the ground;
    Another race the following spring supplies;
      They fall successive; and successive rise.
      - The Iliad (bk. VI, l. 181),
        (Pope's translation) [Man]

If yet not lost to all the sense of shame.
      - The Iliad (bk. VI, l. 350),
        (Pope's translation) [Shame]

A happier lot were mine,
  If I must lose thee, to go down to earth,
    For I shall have no hope when thou art gone,--
      Nothing but sorrow. Father have I none,
        And no dear mother.
      - The Iliad (bk. VI, l. 530),
        (Bryant's translation) [Sorrow]

Yet while my Hector still survives, I see
  My father, mother, brethren, all in thee.
      - The Iliad (bk. VI, l. 544),
        (Pope's translation) [Matrimony]

No living man can send me to the shades
  Before my time; no man of woman born,
    Coward or brave, can shun his destiny.
      - The Iliad (bk. VI, l. 623),
        (Bryant's translation) [Destiny]

Andromache! my soul's far better part.
      - The Iliad (bk. VI, l. 624),
        (Pope's translation) [Matrimony : Wives]

He, from whose lips divine persuasion flows.
      - The Iliad (bk. VII, l. 143),
        (Pope's translation) [Speech]

Not hate, but glory, made these chiefs contend;
  And each brave foe was in his soul a friend.
      - The Iliad (bk. VII, l. 364),
        (Pope's translation) [Contention]

I war not with the dead.
      - The Iliad (bk. VII, l. 485),
        (Pope's translation) [War]

Now from the smooth deep ocean-stream the sun
  Began to climb the heavens, and with new rays
    Smote the surrounding fields.
      - The Iliad (bk. VII, l. 525),
        (Bryant's translation) [Morning]

Now deep in ocean sunk the lamp of light,
  And drew behind the cloudy vale of night.
      - The Iliad (bk. VIII, l. 605),
        (Pope's translation) [Night]

Content to follow when we lead the way.
      - The Iliad (bk. X, l. 141),
        (Pope's translation) [Example]

For all on a razor's edge it stands.
      - The Iliad (bk. X, l. 173) [Danger]

He serves me most who serves his country best.
      - The Iliad (bk. X, l. 206),
        (Pope's translation) [Patriotism]

For when two
  Join in the same adventure, one perceives
    Before the other how they ought to act;
      While one alone, however prompt, resolves
        More tardily and with a weaker will.
      - The Iliad (bk. X, l. 257),
        (Bryant's translation) [Resolution]

Praise me not too much,
  Nor blame me, for thou speakest to the Greeks
    Who know me.
      - The Iliad (bk. X, l. 289),
        (Bryant's translation) [Praise]

Praise from a friend, or censure from a foe,
  Are lost on hearers that our merits know.
      - The Iliad (bk. X, l. 293),
        (Pope's translation) [Praise]

To labour is the lot of man below;
  And when Jove gave us life, he gave us woe.
      - The Iliad (bk. X, l. 78),
        (Pope's translation) [Labor]


Displaying page 4 of 10 for this author:   << Prev  Next >>  1 2 3 [4] 5 6 7 8 9 10

 WWW.GIGA-USA.COM     Back to Top of Page 
The GIGA name and the GIGA logo are trademarks registered in the United States Patent and Trademark Office.
GIGA-USA and GIGA-USA.COM are servicemarks of the domain owner.
Copyright © 1999-2013 John C. Shepard. All Rights Reserved.
Last Revised: 2013 March 16
Click > HERE < to report errors

Buy a good book from
Varying Hare Books