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SAMUEL JOHNSON (A/K/A DR. JOHNSON) ("THE GREAT CHAM OF LITERATURE")
English author and lexicographer
(1709 - 1784)
  CHECK READING LIST (5)    << Prev Page    Displaying page 18 of 37    Next Page >> 

Occupation alone is happiness.
      - [Occupations]

Of all wild beasts preserve me from a tyrant;
  Of all tame-a flatterer.
      - [Flattery]

Of him that hopes to be forgiven it is indispensably required that he forgive. It is, therefore, superfluous to urge any other motive. On this great duty eternity is suspended, and to him that refuses to practise it, the throne of mercy is inaccessible, and the Saviour of the world has been born in vain.
      - [Forgiveness]

Of many, imagined blessings it may be doubted whether he that wants or possesses them had more reason to be satisfied with his lot.
      - [Blessings]

Of riches it is not necessary to write the praise. Let it, however, be remembered that he who has money to spare has it always in his power to benefit others, and of such power a good man must always be desirous.
      - [Riches]

Of the present state, whatever it be, we feel and are forced to confess the misery; yet when the same state is again at a distance, imagination paints it as desirable.
      - [Present]

Of those that spin out trifles and die without a memorial, many flatter themselves with high opinions of their own importance, and imagine that they are every day adding some improvement to human life.
      - [Importance]

Once a coxcomb, always a coxcomb.
      - [Coxcomb]

One cause of the insufficiency of riches (to produce happiness) is, that they very seldom make their owner rich.
      - [Wealth]

One of the amusements of idleness is reading without the fatigue of close attention; and the world therefore swarms with writers whose wish is not to be studied, but to be read.
      - [Idleness]

One of the most pernicious effects of haste is obscurity.
      - [Haste]

Oratory is the power of beating down your adversary's arguments and putting better in their place.
      - [Oratory]

Order is a lovely nymph, the child of Beauty and Wisdom; her attendants are Comfort, Neatness, and Activity; her abode is the valley of happiness; she is always to be found when sought for, and never appears so lovely as when contrasted with her opponent, Disorder.
      - [Order]

Our aspirations are our possibilities.
      - [Aspiration]

Our desires always increase with our possessions. The knowledge that something remains yet unenjoyed impairs our enjoyment of the good before us.
      - [Desire]

Our senses, our appetite, and our passions are our lawful and faithful guides in things that relate solely to this life.
      - [Inclination]

Pain and disease awaken us to convictions which are necessary to our moral condition.
      - [Pain]

Patience and submission are very carefully to be distinguished from cowardice and indolence. We are not to repine, but we may lawfully struggle; or the calamities of life, like the necessities of nature, are calls to labor and exercise of diligence.
      - [Resignation]

Patience, sovereign o'er transmuted ills.
      - [Patience]

Peevishness may be considered the canker of life, that destroys its vigor and checks its improvement; that creeps on with hourly depredations, and taints and vitiates what it cannot consume.
      - [Ills]

Pendantry is the unseasonable ostentation of learning. It may be discovered either in the choice of a subject or in the manner d treating it.
      - [Pedantry]

People may be taken in once, who imagine that an author is greater in private life than other men.
      - [Authorship]

People seldom read a book which is given to them; and few are given. The way to spread a work is to sell it at a low price. No man will send to buy a thing that costs even sixpence without an intention to read it.
      - [Reading]

Philosophy has often attempted to repress insolence by asserting that all conditions are leveled by death; a position which, however it may defect the happy, will seldom afford much comfort to the wretched.
      - [Death]

Piety is the only proper and adequate relief of decaying man. He that grows old without religions hopes, as he declines into imbecility, and feels pains and sorrows incessantly crowding upon him, falls into a gulf of bottomless misery, in which every reflection must plunge him deeper and deeper.
      - [Piety]


Displaying page 18 of 37 for this author:   << Prev  Next >>  1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 [18] 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37

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