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SAMUEL JOHNSON (A/K/A DR. JOHNSON) ("THE GREAT CHAM OF LITERATURE")
English author and lexicographer
(1709 - 1784)
  CHECK READING LIST (5)    << Prev Page    Displaying page 15 of 37    Next Page >> 

Life, to be worthy of a rational being, must be always in progression; we must always purpose to do more or better than in time past.
      - [Purpose]

Little would be wanting to the happiness of life, if every man could conform to the right as soon as he was shown it.
      - [Happiness]

Locke, whom there is no reason to suspect of being a favorer of idleness or libertinism, has advanced that whoever hopes to employ any part of his time with efficacy and vigor must allow some of it to pass with trifles.
      - [Amusements]

Long customs are not easily broken; he that attempts to change the course of his own life very often labors in vain.
      - [Habit]

Love is the wisdom of the fool and the folly of the wise.
      - [Love]

Luxury, so far as it reaches the people, will do good to the race of people; it will strengthen and multiply them. Sir, no nation was ever hurt by luxury; for, as I said before; it can reach but a very few.
      - [Luxury]

Madam, before you flatter a man so grossly to his face, you should consider whether your flattery is worth having.
      - [Flattery]

Man's chief merit consists in resisting the impulses of his nature.
      - [Temptation]

Mankind have a great aversion to intellectual labor; but even supposing knowledge to be easily attainable, more people would be content to be ignorant than would take even a little trouble to acquire it.
      - [Learning]

Many a man is mad in certain instances, and goes through life without having it perceived. For example, a madness has seized a person of supposing himself obliged literally to pray continually; had the madness turned the opposite way, and the person thought it a crime ever to pray, it might not improbably have continued unobserved.
      - [Madness]

Many falsehoods are passing into uncontradicted history.
      - [Falsehood]

Many useful and valuable books lie buried in shops and libraries unknown and unexamined, unless some lucky compiler opens them by chance, and finds an easy spoil of wit and learning.
      - [Quotations]

Marriage has many pains, but celibacy has no pleasures.
      - [Matrimony]

Marriage is the best state for man in general; and every man is a worse man in proportion as he is unfit for the married state.
      - [Matrimony]

Marriage is the strictest tie of perpetual friendship, and there can be no friendship without confidence, and no confidence without integrity; and he must expect to be wretched, who pays to beauty, riches, or politeness that regard which only virtue and piety can claim.
      - [Marriage]

Melancholy, indeed, should be diverted by every means but drinking.
      - [Melancholy]

Memory is the primary and fundamental power, without which there could be no other intellectual operation.
      - [Memory]

Men are like stone jugs,--you may lug them where you like by the ears.
      - [Flattery]

Men become friends by a community of pleasures.
      - [Friendship]

Men have a solicitude about fame; and the greater share they have of it, the more afraid they are of losing it.
      - [Fame]

Men seldom give pleasure when they are not pleased themselves.
      - [Pleasure]

Men who cannot deceive others are very often successful at deceiving themselves.
      - [Deception]

Men who could willingly resign the luxuries and sensual pleasures of a large fortune cannot consent to live without the grandeur and the homage.
      - [Riches]

Milton was a genius that could cut a colossus from a rock, but could not carve heads upon cherry-stones.
      - [Sculpture]

Mirth is like a flash of lightning that breaks through a gloom of clouds and glitters for a moment. Cheerfulness keeps up a daylight in the mind, filling it with a steady and perpetual serenity.
      - [Cheerfulness]


Displaying page 15 of 37 for this author:   << Prev  Next >>  1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 [15] 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37

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