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EDMUND SPENSER
English poet
(1552? - 1599)
  CHECK READING LIST (2)    << Prev Page    Displaying page 6 of 7    Next Page >> 

Gold all is not that doth golden seem.
      - The Faerie Queene
         (bk. II, canto VIII, st. 14) [Appearance]

How oft do their silver bowers leave,
  To come to succour us that succour want!
      - The Faerie Queene
         (bk. II, canto VIII, st. 2) [Angels]

Through thick and thin, both over banck and bush,
  In hope her to attaine by hooke or crooke.
      - The Faerie Queene
         (bk. III, canto I, st. 17)
        [Constancy : Proverbial Phrases]

So dischord ofte in musick makes the sweeter lay.
      - The Faerie Queene
         (bk. III, canto II, st. 15) [Music]

"Life is not lost," said she, "for which is bought
  Endlesse renowne."
      - The Faerie Queene
         (bk. III, canto IX, st. 19) [Life]

Man's wretched state,
  That floures so fresh at morne, and fades at evening late.
      - The Faerie Queene
         (bk. III, canto IX, st. 39) [Man]

Divine Tobacco.
      - The Faerie Queene
         (bk. III, canto V, st. 32) [Tobacco]

Her berth was of the wombe of morning dew
  And her conception of the joyous prime.
      - The Faerie Queene
         (bk. III, canto VI, st. 3) [Fairies]

Roses red and violets blew,
  And all the sweetest flowres that in the forrest grew.
      - The Faerie Queene
         (bk. III, canto VI, st. 6) [Flowers]

Like as a feareful partridge, that is fledd
  From the sharpe hauke which her attacked neare,
    And falls to ground to seeke for succor theare,
      Whereas the hungry spaniells she does spye,
        With greedy jawes her ready for to teare.
      - The Faerie Queene
         (bk. III, canto VIII, st. 33)
        [Partridges]

And painefull pleasure turnes to pleasing paine.
      - The Faerie Queene
         (bk. III, canto X, st. 60) [Pleasure]

Gather the rose of love whilst yet is time.
      - The Faerie Queene
         (bk. III, canto XII, st. 75) [Time]

Dan Chaucer, well of English undefyled.
  On Fame's eternall beadroll worthie to be fyled.
      - The Faerie Queene
         (bk. IV, canto II, st. 32) [Poets]

And with unwearied fingers drawing out
  The lines of life, from living knowledge hid.
      - The Faerie Queene
         (bk. IV, canto II, st. 48) [Students]

Yet was he but a squire of low degree.
      - The Faerie Queene
         (bk. IV, canto VII, st. 15) [Obscurity]

For all that Nature by her mother-wit
  Could frame in earth.
      - The Faerie Queene
         (bk. IV, canto X, st. 21) [Nature]

He maketh kings to sit in soverainty;
  He maketh subjects to their powre obey;
    He pulleth downe, he setteth up on hy:
      He gives to this, from that he takes away;
        For all we have is his: what he list doe he may.
      - The Faerie Queene
         (bk. V, canto II, st. 41) [Providence]

For take thy ballaunce if thou be so wise,
  And weigh the winds that under heaven doth blow;
    Or weigh the light that in the east doth rise;
      Or weigh the thought that from man's mind doth flow.
      - The Faerie Queene
         (bk. V, canto II, st. 43)
        [Folly : Reflection]

Ill can he rule the great that cannot reach the small.
      - The Faerie Queene
         (bk. V, canto II, st. 51) [Government]

Who will not mercie unto others show,
  How can he mercie ever hope to have?
      - The Faerie Queene
         (bk. VI, canto I, st. 42) [Mercy]

The gentle minde by gentle deeds is knowne;
  For a man by nothing is so well bewrayed
    As by his manners.
      - The Faerie Queene
         (bk. VI, canto III, st. 1) [Gentlemen]

So forth issew'd the Seasons of the yeare:
  First, lusty Spring, all dight in leaves of flowres
    That freshly budded and new bloomes did beare,
      In which a thousand birds had build their bowres
        That sweetly sung to call forth paramours;
          And in his hand a javelin he did beare,
            And on his head (as fit for warlike stoures)
              A guilt, engraven morion he did weare:
                That, as some did him love, so others did him feare.
      - The Faerie Queene
         (bk. VII, canto VII, Legend of Constancie, st. 28)
        [Spring]

Then came the jolly sommer, being dight
  In a thin silken cassock, coloured greene,
    That was unlyned all, to be more light.
      - The Faerie Queene
         (bk. VII, canto VII, st. 29) [Summer]

Lo I the man, whose Muse whilome did maske,
  As time her taught, in lowly Shepheards weeds,
    Am now enforst a far vnfitter taske,
      For trumpets sterne to chaunge mine Oaten reeds,
        And sing of Knights and Ladies gentle deeds;
          Whose prayses hauing slept in silence long,
            Me, all too meane, the sacred Muse areeds
              To blazon broad emongst her learned throng:
                Fierce warres and faithfull loues shall moralize my song.
      - The Faerie Queene (book I)
        [Books (First Lines)]

A Gentle Knight was pricking on the plaine,
  Y cladd in mightie armes and siluer shielde,
    Wherein old dints of deepe wounds did remaine,
      The cruell markes of many' a bloudy fielde;
        Yet armes till that time did he neuer wield:
          His angry steede did chide his foming bitt,
            As much disdayning to the curbe to yield:
              Full iolly knight he seemd, and faire did sitt,
                As one for knightly giusts and fierce encounters fitt.
      - The Faerie Queene (book I, canto I)
        [Books (First Lines)]


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