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TEARS
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[ Also see Consolation Crying Death Feeling Grief Laughter Mourning Pity Sadness Sensibility Sorrow Sympathy Weeping Woe ]

Thy heart is big; get thee apart and weep.
  Passion, I see, is catching; for mine eyes,
    Seeing those beads of sorrow stand in thine,
      Begin to water.
      - William Shakespeare, Julius Caesar

If you have tears, prepare to shed them now.
      - William Shakespeare, Julius Caesar
         (Antony at III, ii)

And as the butcher takes away the calf
  And binds the wretch and beats it when it strains,
    Bearing it to the bloody slaughterhouse,
      Even so remorseless have they borne him hence;
        And as the dam runs lowing up and down,
          Looking the way her harmless young one went,
            And can do naught but wail her darling's loss,
              Even so myself bewails good Gloucester's case
                With said unhelpful tears, and with dimmed eyes
                  Look after him and cannot do him good,
                    So mighty are his vowed enemies.
                      His fortunes I will weep, and 'twixt each groan
                        Say 'Who's a traitor? Gloucester he is none.'
      - William Shakespeare,
        King Henry the Sixth, Part II
         (King Henry at III, i)

I cannot weep, for all my body's moisture
  Scarce serves to quench my furnace-burning heart;
    Nor can my tongue unload my heart's great burden,
      For selfsame wind that I should speak withal
        Is kindling coals that fires all my breast
          And burns me up with flames that tears would quench.
      - William Shakespeare,
        King Henry the Sixth, Part III
         (Richard, Duke of Gloucester at II, i)

See, see what show'rs arise,
  Blown with windy tempest of my heart
    Upon thy wounds, that kills mine eye and heart.
      - William Shakespeare,
        King Henry the Sixth, Part III
         (Father at II, v)

Lords, knights and gentlemen, what I should say
  My tears gainsay; for every word I speak,
    Ye see I drink the water of my eye.
      - William Shakespeare,
        King Henry the Sixth, Part III
         (Queen Margaret at V, iv)

You think I'll weep.
  No, I'll not weep.
    I have full cause of weeping, but this heart
      Shall break into a hundred thousand flaws
        Or ere I'll weep.
      - William Shakespeare, King Lear
         (King Lear at II, iv)

There she shook
  The holy water from her heavenly eyes,
    And clamor moistened; then away she started
      To deal with grief alone.
      - William Shakespeare, King Lear
         (Gentleman at IV, iii)

When we are born, we cry that we are come
  To this great stage of fools.
      - William Shakespeare, King Lear
         (King Lear at IV, vi)

If this austere insociable life
  Change not your offer made in heat of blood;
    If frosts and fasts, hard lodging and thin weeds,
      Nip not the gaudy blossoms of your love,
        But that it bear this trial, and last love;
          Then, at the expiration of the year,
            Come challenge me, challenge me by these deserts,
              And, by this virgin palm now kissing thine,
                I will be thine; and till that instant, shut
                  My woeful self up in a mourning house,
                    Raining the tears of lamentation
                      For the remembrance of my father's death.
      - William Shakespeare, Love's Labor's Lost
         (Princess of France at V, ii)

My plenteous joys,
  Wanton in fullness, seek to hide themselves
    In drops of sorrow.
      - William Shakespeare, Macbeth
         (Duncan, King of Scotland at I, iv)

Left her in her tears, and dried not one of them with his comfort; swallowed his vows whole, pretending in her discoveries of dishonor; in few, bestowed here on her own lamentation, which she yet wears for his sake; and he, a marble to her tears, is washed with them, but relents not.
      - William Shakespeare, Measure for Measure
         (Vincentio, the Duke at III, i)

(Leonato:) Did he break into tears?
  (Messenger:) In great measure.
    (Leonato:) A kind overflow of kindness. There are no faces truer than those that are so washed. How much better is it to weep at joy than to joy at weeping!
      - William Shakespeare,
        Much Ado About Nothing
         (Leonato & Messenger at I, i)

If that the earth could teem with woman's tears,
  Each drop she falls would prove a crocodile.
      - William Shakespeare,
        Othello the Moor of Venice
         (Othello at IV, i)

Then must you speak
  Of one that loved not wisely, but too well;
    Of one not easily jealous, but, being wrought,
      Perplexed in the extreme; of one whose hand,
        Like the base Judean, threw a pearl away
          Richer than all his tribe; of one whose subdued eyes
            Albeit unused to the melting mood,
              Drop tears as fast as the Arabian trees
                Their med'cinable gum.
      - William Shakespeare,
        Othello the Moor of Venice
         (Othello at V, ii)

Sir, I am about to weep; but, thinking that
  We are a queen (or long have dreamed so), certain
    The daughter of a king, my drops of tears
      I'll turn to sparks of fire.
      - William Shakespeare,
        The Life of King Henry the Eighth
         (Katherine at II, iv)

Cromwell, I did not think to shed a tear
  In all my miseries; but thou hast forced me
    (Out of thy honest truth) to play the woman.
      - William Shakespeare,
        The Life of King Henry the Eighth
         (Wolsey at III, ii)

He has strangled
  His language in his tears.
      - William Shakespeare,
        The Life of King Henry the Eighth
         (King Henry at V, i)

The pretty and sweet manner of it forced
  Those waters from me which I would have stopped;
    But I had not so much of man in me,
      And all my mother came into mine eyes
        And gave me up to tears.
      - William Shakespeare,
        The Life of King Henry the Fifth
         (King Henry at IV, vi)

And if the boy have not a woman's gift
  To rain a shower of commanded tears,
    An onion will do well for such a shift,
      Which in a napkin being close conveyed
        Shall in despite enforce a watery eye.
      - William Shakespeare,
        The Taming of the Shrew
         (Lord at induction, i)

Those eyes of thine from mine have drawn salt tears,
  Shamed their aspects with store of childish drops:
    These eyes, which never shed remorseful tear--
      - William Shakespeare,
        The Tragedy of King Richard the Third
         (King Richard at I, ii)

What! we have many goodly days to see:
  The liquid drops of tears that you have shed
    Shall come again, transformed to orient pearl,
      Advantaging their love with interest
        Of ten times double gain of happiness.
      - William Shakespeare,
        The Tragedy of King Richard the Third
         (King Richard at IV, iv)

Why, man, if the river were dry, I am able to fill it with my tears. If the wind were down, I could drive the boat with my sighs.
      - William Shakespeare,
        The Two Gentlemen of Verona
         (Launce at II, iii)

Madam, 'twas Ariadne passioning
  For Theseus' perjury and unjust flight,
    Which I so lively acted with my tears
      That my poor mistress, moved therewithal,
        Wept bitterly; and would I might be dead,
          If I in thought felt not her very sorrow!
      - William Shakespeare,
        The Two Gentlemen of Verona
         (Julia at IV, iv)

When I did name her brothers, then fresh tears
  Stood on her cheeks, as doth the honeydew
    Upon a gath'red lily almost withered.
      - William Shakespeare, Titus Andronicus
         (Titus at III, i)


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