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EDWARD GEORGE EARLE LYTTON BULWER-LYTTON, 1ST BARON LYTTON
English novelist and politician
(1803 - 1873)
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The circle of life is cut up into segments. All lines are equal if they are drawn from the centre and touch the circumference.
      - [Equality]

The classic literature is always modern.
      - [Literature]

The cleverness of avarice is but the cunning of imbecility.
      - [Misers]

The curse of the great is ennui.
      - [Ennui]

The desire of excellence is the necessary attribute of those who excel. We work little for a thing unless we wish for it. But we cannot of ourselves estimate the degree of our success in what we strive for; that task is left to others. With the desire for excellence comes, therefore, the desire for approbation. And this distinguishes intellectual excellence from moral excellence; for the latter has no necessity of human tribunal; it is more inclined to shrink from the public than to invite the public to be its judge.
      - [Excellence]

The distinguishing trait of people accustomed to good society is a calm, imperturbable quiet which pervades all their actions and habits, from the greatest to the least. They eat in quiet, move in quiet, live in quiet, and lose their wife, or even their money, in quiet; while low persons cannot take up either a spoon or an affront without making such an amazing noise about it.
      - [Manners]

The faults of a brilliant writer are never dangerous on the long run; a thousand people read his work who would read no other; inquiry is directed to each of his doctrines; it is soon discovered what is sound and what is false; the sound become maxims, and the false beacons.
      - [Authorship]

The fine tints and fluent curves which constitute beauty of character.
      - [Character]

The first essential to success in the art you practice is respect for the art itself.
      - [Art]

The food of hope is meditative action.
      - [Action]

The frenzy of nations is the statesmanship of fate.
      - [Zeal]

The friendship between great men is rarely intimate or permanent. It is a Boswell that most appreciates a Johnson. Genius has no brother, no co-mate; the love it inspires is that of a pupil or a son.
      - [Friendship]

The grave is, I suspect, the sole commonwealth which attains that dead flat of social equality that life in its every principle so heartily abhors.
      - [Graves]

The great secrets of being courted are, to shun others, and seem delighted with yourself.
      - [Popularity]

The haughty woman who can stand alone, and requires no leaning-place in our hearts, loses the spell of her sex.
      - [Pride]

The heart of a girl is like a convent--the holier the cloister, the more charitable the door.
      - [Charity]

The higher the rank the less pretence, because there is less to pretend to.
      - [Pretension]

The imagination acquires by custom a certain involuntary, unconscious power of observation and comparison, correcting its own mistakes, and arriving at precision of judgment, just as the outward eye is disciplined to compare, adjust, estimate, measure, the objects reflected on the back of its retina. The imagination is but the faculty of glassing images; and it is with exceeding difficulty, and by the imperative will of the reasoning faculty resolved to mislead it, that it glasses images which have no prototype in truth and nature.
      - [Imagination]

The law is a gun, which if it misses a pigeon always kills a crow; if it does not strike the guilty, it hits some one else. As every crime creates a law, so in turn every law creates a crime.
      - [Law]

The man who has acquired the habit of study, though for only one hour every day in the year, and keeps to the one thing studied till it is mastered, will be startled to see the way he has made at the end of a twelvemonth.
      - [Study]

The man who wants his wedding garments to suit him must allow plenty of time for the measure.
      - [Proverbs]

The mate for beauty should be a man and not a money chest.
      - [Beauty]

The mind profits by the wrecks of every passion.
      - [Passion]

The more a man desirous to pass at a value above his worth can contrast, by dignified silence, the garrulity of trivial minds, the more the world will give him credit for the wealth which he does not possess.
      - [Silence]

The most delicate beauty in the mind of women is, and ever must be, an independence of artificial stimulants for content. It is not so with men. The links that bind men to capitals belong to the golden chain of civilization,--the chain which fastens all our destinies to the throne of Jove. And hence the larger proportion of men in whom genius is pre-eminent have preferred to live in cities, though some of them have bequeathed to us the loveliest pictures of the rural scenes in which they declined to dwell.
      - [Cities]


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