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HENRY WADSWORTH LONGFELLOW
American poet and scholar
(1807 - 1882)
  CHECK READING LIST (3)    << Prev Page    Displaying page 26 of 26

O child! O new-born denizen
  Of life's great city! on thy head
    The glory of morn is shed,
      Like a celestial benison!
        Here at the portal thou dost stand,
          And with thy little hand
            Thou openest the mysterious gate
              Into the future's undiscovered land.
      - To a Child [Babyhood]

Thou driftest gently down the tides of sleep.
      - To a Child (l. 115) [Sleep]

From labor there shall come forth rest.
      - To a Child (l. 162) [Labor]

As great Pythagoras of yore,
  Standing beside the blacksmith's door,
    And hearing the hammers, as they smote
      The anvils with a different note,
        Stole from the varying tones, that hung
          Vibrant on every iron tongue,
            The secret of the sounding wire,
              And formed the seven-chorded lyre.
      - To a Child (l. 175) [Blacksmithing]

Welcome, my old friend,
  Welcome to a foreign fireside.
      - To an Old Danish Song-Book [Welcome]

Thou Royal River, born of sun and shower
  In chambers purple with the Alpine glow,
    Wrapped in the spotless ermine of the snow
      And rocked by tempests!
      - To the River Rhone [Rhone River]

O lovely river of Yvette!
  O darling river! like a bride,
    Some dimpled, bashful, fair Lisette
      Thou goest to wed the Orge's tide.
        O lovely river Yvette!
          O darling stream! on balanced wings
            The wood-birds sang the chansonnette
              That here a wandering poet sings.
      - To the River Yvette (st. 5) [Yvette River]

Far off I hear the crowing of the cocks,
  And through the opening door that time unlocks
    Feel the fresh breathing of To-morrow creep.
      - To-morrow [Morning : Tomorrow]

To-morrow! the mysterious, unknown guest,
  Who cries to me: "Remember Barmecide,
    And tremble to be happy with the rest."
      And I make answer: "I am satisfied;
        I dare not ask; I know not what is best;
          God hath already said what shall betide."
      - To-Morrow [Tomorrow]

Hospitality sitting with gladness.
      - Translation from Frithiof's Saga
        [Hospitality]

The ceaseless rain is falling fast,
  And yonder gilded vane,
    Immovable for three days past,
      Points to the misty main.
      - Travels by the Fireside (st. 1) [Rain]

The twilight is sad and cloudy,
  The wind blows wild and free,
    And like the wings of sea-birds
      Flash the white caps of the sea.
      - Twilight [Twilight]

Then fell upon the house a sudden gloom,
  A shadow on those features fair and thin;
    And softly, from the hushed and darkened room,
      Two angels issued, where but one went in.
      - Two Angels (st. 9) [Death]

Midnight! the outpost of advancing day!
  The frontier town and citadel of night!
      - Two Rivers (pt. I) [Midnight]

White swan of cities, slumbering in thy nest
  So wonderfully built among the reeds
    Of the lagoon, that fences thee and feeds,
      As sayeth thy old historian and thy guest!
      - Venice [Venice]

Look, then, into thine heart and write!
      - Voices of the Night (prelude, st. 19)
        [Authorship]

Like one in prayer I stood.
      - Voices of the Night--Prelude (st. 11)
        [Prayer]

Nature with folded hand seemed there,
  Kneeling at her evening prayer!
      - Voices of the Night--Prelude (st. 11)
        [Nature]

Books are sepulchres of thought.
      - Wind Over the Chimney (st. 8) [Books]

Chill airs and wintry winds! my ear
  Has grown familiar with your song;
    I hear it in the opening year,
      I listen, and it cheers me long.
      - Woods in Winter (st. 7) [Wind]

And fast through the midnight dark and drear,
  Through the whistling sleet and snow,
    Like a sheeted ghost, the vessel swept
      Towards the reef of Norman's Woe.
      - Wreck of the Hesperus (st. 15) [Shipwreck]

Blue were her eyes as the fairy-flax,
  Her cheeks like the dawn of day,
    And her bosom white as the hawthorn buds,
      That ope in the month of May.
      - Wreck of the Hesperus (st. 2) [Beauty]

Janus am I; oldest of potentates!
  Forward I look and backward and below
    I count--as god of avenues and gates--
      The years that through my portals come and go.
        I block the roads and drift the fields with snow,
          I chase the wild-fowl from the frozen fen;
            My frosts congeal the rivers in their flow,
              My fires light up the hearths and hearts of men.
      - Written for the Children's Almanac [Gods]


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