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JOHN DRYDEN
English poet and dramatist
(1631 - 1700)
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By tracing Heaven his footsteps may be found:
  Behold! how awfully he walks the round!
    God is abroad, and wondrous in his ways
      The rise of empires, and their fall surveys.
      - Britannia Rediviva (l. 75) [God]

The proud he tam'd, the penitent he cheer'd:
  Nor to rebuke the rich offender fear'd.
    His preaching much, but more his practice wrought;
      (A living sermon of the truths he taught:)
        For this by rules severe his life he squar'd:
          That all might see the doctrines which they heard.
      - Character of a Good Parson (l. 75)
        [Preaching]

Keen appetite
  And quick digestion wait on you and yours.
      - Cleomenes (act IV, sc. 1) [Appetite]

For women with a mischief to their kind,
  Pervert with bad advice our better mind.
      - Cock and the Fox (l. 555) [Women]

A woman's counsel brought us first to woe,
  And made her man his paradise forego,
    Where at heart's ease he liv'd; and might have been
      As free from sorrow as he was from sin.
      - Cock and the Fox (l. 557) [Women]

I am as free as nature first made man,
  Ere the base laws of servitude began,
    When wild in woods the noble savage ran.
      - Conquest of Granada (act I, sc. 1)
        [Freedom]

Forgiveness to the injured does belong,
  But they ne'er pardon who have done the wrong.
      - Conquest of Granada (pt. II, act I, sc. 2)
        [Forgiveness : Proverbs]

Old as I am, for ladies' love unfit,
  The power of beauty I remember yet,
    Which once inflam'd my soul, and still inspires my wit.
      - Cymon and Iphigenia (l. 1) [Beauty]

The fool of nature stood with stupid eyes
  And gaping mouth, that testified surprise.
      - Cymon and Iphigenia (l. 107) [Stupidity]

Love taught him shame; and shame, with love at strife,
  Soon taught the sweet civilities of life.
      - Cymon and Iphigenia (l. 133) [Love : Shame]

She hugg'd the offender, and forgave the offence;
  Sex to the last.
      - Cymon and Iphigenia (l. 367) [Women]

She hugged the offender, and forgave the offense,
  Sex to the last.
      - Cymon and Iphigenia (l. 367) [Forgiveness]

Mouths without hands; maintained at vast expense,
  In peace a charge, in war a weak defense:
    Stout once a month they march, a blustering band,
      And ever, but in times of need, at hand.
      - Cymon and Iphigenia (l. 401) [Soldiers]

Then hasten to be drunk, the business of the day.
      - Cymon and Iphigenia (l. 407)
        [Intemperance]

When beauty fires the blood, how love exalts the mind!
      - Cymon and Iphigenia (l. 41) [Beauty]

Ill fortune seldom comes alone.
      - Cymon and Iphigenia (l. 592) [Fortune]

He trudg'd along, unknowing what he sought,
  And whistled as he went, for want of thought.
      - Cymon and Iphigenia (l. 84) [Thought]

This comes of altering fundamental laws and overpersuading by his landlord to take physic (of which he died) for the benefit of the doctor--Stavo bene (was written on his monument) ma per star meglio, sto qui.
      - Dedication of the Aeneid (XIV, 149)
        [Epitaphs]

Ill writers are usually the sharpest censors.
      - Dedication of translations from Ovid
        [Criticism]

I trade both with the living and the dead for the enrichment of our native language.
      - Dedication to translation of The Aeneid
        [Words]

Ay, these look like the workmanship of heaven;
  This is the porcelain clay of human kind,
    And therefore cast into these noble moulds.
      - Don Sebastian (act I, sc. 1) [Nobility]

Let fortune empty her whole quiver on me.
  I have a soul that, like an ample shield,
    Can take in all, and verge enough for more.
      - Don Sebastian (act I, sc. 1) [Fortune]

This is the porcelain clay of humankind.
      - Don Sebastian (act I, sc. 1) [Frailty : Man]

Damn'd neuters, in their middle way of steering,
  Are neither fish, nor flesh, nor good red herring.
      - Duke of Guise (epilogue, l. 39) [Fish]

Damned Neuters, in their Middle way of Steering,
  Are neither Fish, nor Flesh, nor good Red Herring.
      - Duke of Guise--Epilogue [Politics]


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