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JOSEPH ADDISON
English essayist, poet and statesman
(1672 - 1719)
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Talk not of comfort--'tis for lighter ills,
 * * * * *
I will indulge my sorrow, and give way
  To all the pangs and fury of despair.
      - [Despair]

Talking with a friend is nothing else but thinking aloud.
      - [Friends]

Temperance gives nature her full play, and enables her to exert herself in all her force and vigor.
      - [Temperance]

That charity which is the perfection and ornament of religion.
      - [Charity]

That courage which arises from the sense of our duty, and from the fear of offending Him that made us, acts always in a uniform manner, and according to the dictates of right reason.
      - [Bravery]

That fine part of our construction, the eye, seems as much the receptacle and seat of our passions as the mind itself; and at least it is the outward portal to introduce them to the house within, or rather the common thoroughfare to let our affections pass in and out.
      - [Eyes]

The care of our national commerce redounds more to the riches and prosperity of the public than any other act of government.
      - [Commerce]

The chief ingredients in the composition of those qualities that gain esteem and praise are good nature, truth, good sense, and good breeding.
      - [Esteem]

The circumstance which gives authors an advantage above all these great masters, is this, that they can multiply their originals; or rather, can make copies of their works, to what number they please, which shall be as valuable as the originals themselves.
      - in the "Spectator", no. 166 [Authorship]

The consciousness of being loved softens the keenest pang even at the moment of parting; yea, even the eternal farewell is robbed of half of its bitterness when uttered in accents that breathe love to the last sigh.
      - [Love]

The courage that grows from constitution very often forsakes a man when he has occasion for it; and when it is only a kind of instinct in the soul, it breaks out on all occasions, without judgment or discretion.
      - [Cowards]

The first of all virtues is innocence; the next is modesty. If we banish modesty out of the world, she carries away with her half the virtue that is in it.
      - [Innocence : Modesty]

The first race of mankind used to dispute, as our ordinary people do now-a-days, in a kind of wild logic, uncultivated by rule of art.
      - [Argument]

The gods in bounty work up storms about us, that give mankind occasion to exert their hidden strength, and throw out into practice virtues that shun the day, and lie concealed in the smooth seasons and the calms of life.
      - [Adversity]

The grand essentials to happiness in this life are something to do, something to love, and something to hope for.
      - [Happiness]

The great art in writing advertisements is the finding out a proper method to catch the reader's eye; without which a good thing may pass over unobserved, or be lost among commissions of bankrupt.
      - in the "Tatler", no. 224 [Journalism]

The great number of the Jews furnishes us with a sufficient cloud of witnesses that attest the truth of the Bible.
      - [Jews]

The greatest parts, without discretion as observed by an elegant writer, may be fatal to their owner; as Polyphemus, deprived of his eyes, was only the more exposed on account of his enormous strength and stature.
      - [Discretion]

The head has the most beautiful appearance, as well as the highest station, in a human figure.
      - [Head]

The hours of a wise man are lengthened by his ideas, as those of a fool are by his passions. The time of the one is long, because he does not know what to do with it; so is that of the other, because he distinguishes every moment of it with useful or amusing thoughts--or, in other words, because the one is always wishing it away, and the other always enjoying it.
      - [Time]

The intelligence of affection is carried on by the eye only; good-breeding has made the tongue falsify the heart, and act a part of continued restraint, while nature has preserved the eyes to herself, that she may not be disguised or misrepresented.
      - [Eyes]

The jealous man's disease is of so malignant a nature that it converts all it takes into its own nourishment.
      - [Jealousy]

The lives of great men cannot be writ with any tolerable degree of elegance or exactness within a short time after their decease.
      - [Biography]

The man who will live above his present circumstances is in great danger of living in a little time much beneath them, or, as the Italian proverb says: The man who lives by hope will die by despair."
      - [Economy]

The memory is perpetually looking back when we have nothing present to entertain us. It is like those repositories in animals that are filled with food, on which they may ruminate when their present pastures fail.
      - [Memory]


Displaying page 11 of 18 for this author:   << Prev  Next >>  1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 [11] 12 13 14 15 16 17 18

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