GIGA THE MOST EXTENSIVE
COLLECTION OF
QUOTATIONS
ON THE INTERNET
Google
Search GIGA
Loading
Home
Page
GIGA
Quotes
Biographical
Name Index
Chronological
Name Index
Topic
List
Reading
List
Site
Notes
Crossword
Solver
Anagram
Solver
Subanagram
Solver
TOPICS:          A   B   C   D   E   F   G   H   I   J   K   L   M   N   O   P   Q   R   S   T   U   V   W   X   Y   Z
PEOPLE:    #   A   B   C   D   E   F   G   H   I   J   K   L   M   N   O   P   Q   R   S   T   U   V   W   X   Y   Z


JOSEPH ADDISON
English essayist, poet and statesman
(1672 - 1719)
 << Prev Page    Displaying page 15 of 18    Next Page >> 

Vanity is the natural weakness of an ambitious man, which exposes him to the secret scorn and derision of those he converses with, and ruins the character he is so industrious to advance by it.
      - [Vanity]

Virgil has very finely touched upon the female passion for dress and shows, in the character of Camilla; who though she seems to have shaken off all the other weaknesses of her sex, is still described as a woman in this particular.
      - [Dress]

Virtue which shuns, the day.
      - [Modesty]

Virtues that shun the day, and lie concealed in the smooth seasons and the calm of life.
      - [Retirement]

Vivacity is the gift of woman.
      - [Vivacity]

Waning moons their settled periods keep, to swell the billows and ferment the deep.
      - [Moon]

We are apt to rely upon future prospects, and become really expensive while we are only rich in possibility. We live up to our expectations, not to our possessions, and make a figure proportionable to what we may be, not what we are.
      - [Anticipation]

We make provisions for this life as if it were never to have an end, and for the other life as though it were never to have a beginning.
      - [Life]

We see the pernicious effects of luxury in the ancient Romans, who immediately found themselves poor as soon as this vice got footing among them.
      - [Luxury]

Were a man's sorrows and disquietudes summed up at the end of his life, it would generally be found that he had suffered more from the apprehension of such evils as never happened to him than from those evils which had really befallen him.
      - [Fear]

Were not this desire of fame very strong, the difficulty of obtaining it, and the danger of losing it when obtained, would be sufficient to deter a man from so vain a pursuit.
      - in "The Spectator", no. 255 [Fame]

What an absurd thing it is to pass over all the valuable parts of a man, and fix our attention on his infirmities!
      - [Imperfection]

What are these wondrous civilizing arts, this Roman polish, and this smooth behavior that render man thus tractable and tame?
      - [Etiquette]

What can be nobler than the idea it gives us of the Supreme Being?
      - [Bible]

What can that man fear who takes care to please a Being that is able to crush all his adversaries?
      - [Fear]

What sculpture is to a block of marble, education is to the soul.
      - in the "Spectator", no. 215 [Soul]

When a man has been guilty of any vice or folly, I think the best atonement he can make for it is to warn others not to fall into the like.
      - [Repentance]

When a man is made up wholly of the dove, without the least grain of the serpent in his composition, he becomes ridiculous in many circumstances of life, and very often discredits his best actions.
      - [Simplicity]

When I behold a fashionable table set out in all its magnificence, I fancy that I see gouts and dropsies, fevers and lethargies, with other innumerable distempers lying in ambuscade among the dishes. Nature delights in the most plain and simple diet. Every animal but man keeps to one dish. Herbs are the food of this species, fish of that, and flesh of a third. Man falls upon everything that comes in his way; not the smallest fruit or excrescence of the earth, scarce a berry or a mushroom can escape him.
      - [Gluttony]

When I look upon the tombs of the great, every motion of envy dies; when I read the epitaphs of the beautiful, every inordinate desire forsake me; when I meet with the grief of parents upon a tombstone, my heart melts with compassion; when I see the tombs of the parents themselves, I reflect how vain it is to grieve for those whom we must quickly follow; when I see kings lying beside those who deposed them, when I behold rival wits placed side by side, or the holy men who divided the world with their contests and disputes, I reflect with sorrow and astonishment on the frivolous competitions, factions, and debates of mankind.
      - [Reflection]

When I read the rules of criticism, I immediately inquire after the works of the author who has written them, and by that means discover what it is he likes in a composition.
      - in the "Guardian", no. 115 [Criticism]

When time itself shall be no more.
      - [Time]

Where vice prevails, and impious men bear sway, the post of honor is a private station.
      - [Politics]

Whether dark presages of the night proceed from any latent power of the soul during her abstraction, or from any operation of subordinate spirits, has been a dispute.
      - [Spirits]

Whether zeal or moderation be the point we aim at, let us keep fire out of the one and frost out of the other.
      - [Zeal]


Displaying page 15 of 18 for this author:   << Prev  Next >>  1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 [15] 16 17 18

 WWW.GIGA-USA.COM     Back to Top of Page 
The GIGA name and the GIGA logo are trademarks registered in the United States Patent and Trademark Office.
GIGA-USA and GIGA-USA.COM are servicemarks of the domain owner.
Copyright © 1999-2016 John C. Shepard. All Rights Reserved.
Last Revised: 2016 June 16
Click > HERE < to report errors