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ROBERT BURTON
English writer, philosopher and humorist
(1576 - 1640)
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If adversity hath killed his thousands, prosperity hath killed his ten thousands; therefore adversity is to be preferred. The one deceives, the other instructs; the one miserably happy, the other happily miserable.
      - [Adversity]

It never yet happened to any man since the beginning of the world, nor ever will, to have all things according to his desire, or to whom fortune was never opposite and adverse.
      - [Disappointment]

Italy, a paradise for horses, hell for women, as the proverb goes.
      - [Italy]

Let the world have their Maygames, wakes, whetsunales, their dancings and concerts; their puppet-shows, hobby horses, tabors, bagpipes, balls, barley-breaks, and whatever sports and recreations please them best, provided they be followed with discretion.
      - [Amusements]

Like dogs in a wheel, birds in a cage, or squirrels in a chain, ambitious men still climb and climb, with great labor, and incessant anxiety, but never reach the top.
      - [Ambition]

Make a virtue of necessity.
      - [Proverbs]

Matches are made in heaven.
      - [Proverbs]

Melancholy advanceth men's conceits more than shy humor whatever.
      - [Melancholy]

Misery assails riches, as lightning does the highest towers; or as a tree that is heavy laden with fruit breaks its own boughs, so do riches destroy the virtue of their possessor.
      - [Riches]

Of all vanities of fopperies, the vanity of high birth is the greatest. True nobility is derived from virtue, not from birth. Titles, indeed, may be purchased, but virtue is the only coin that makes the bargain valid.
      - [Ancestry]

Of all varieties of fopperies, the vanity of high birth is the greatest. True nobility is derived from virtue, not from birth. Title, indeed, may be purchased, but virtue is the only coin that makes the bargain valid.
      - [Nobility]

Old friends become bitter enemies on a sudden for toys and small offenses.
      - [Friends]

One was never married and that's his hell; another is, and that's his plague.
      - [Marriage]

Our writings are so many dishes, our readers guests, our books like beauty; that which one admires another rejects; so are we approved as men's fancies are inclined.
      - [Authorship]

Perigrination charms our senses with such unspeakable and sweet variety that some count him that never traveled--a kind of prisoner, and pity his case: that, from his cradle to his old age, he beholds the same still, still,--still, the same, the same.
      - [Travel]

Sickness is the mother of modesty, as it puts us in mind of our mortality, and while we drive on heedlessly in the full career of worldly pomp and jollity, kindly pulls us by the ear, and brings us to a sense of our duty.
      - [Sickness]

Speak with contempt of no man. Every one hath a tender sense of reputation. And every man hath a sting, which he may, if provoked too far, dart out at one time or other.
      - [Contempt]

Sports and gaming, whether pursued from a desire of gain or love of pleasure, are as ruinous to the temper and disposition of the party addicted to them, as they are to his fame and fortune.
      - [Gambling]

Temperance is a bridle of gold; he who uses it rightly, is more like a god than a man.
      - [Temperance]

That which is a law today is none tomorrow.
      - [Law]

The band of conjugal love is adamantine.
      - [Wedlock]

The passions and desires, like the two twists of a rope, mutually mix one with the other, and twin inextricably round the heart; producing good if moderately indulged; but certain destruction if suffered to become inordinate.
      - [Desire]

The world produces for every pint of honey a gallon of gall, for every dram of pleasure a pound of pain, for every inch of mirth an ell of moan; and as the ivy twines around the oak, so does misery and misfortune encompass the happy man. Felicity, pure and unalloyed felicity, is not a plant of earthly growth; her gardens are the skies.
      - [Felicity]

There are true graces, which, as Homer feigns, are linked and tied hand in hand, because it is by their influence that human hearts are so firmly united to each other.
      - [Grace]

They lard their lean books with the fat of others' works.
      - [Writers]


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