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ROBERT BURTON
English writer, philosopher and humorist
(1576 - 1640)
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He is born naked, and falls a whining at the first.
      - Anatomy of Melancholy
         (pt. I, sec. II, mem. 3, subsect. 10)
        [Birth]

Homer himself must beg if he want means, and as by report sometimes he did "go from door to door and sing ballads, with a company of boys about him."
      - Anatomy of Melancholy
         (pt. I, sec. II, mem. 4, subsect. 6)
        [Beggary]

Build castles in the air.
      - Anatomy of Melancholy
         (pt. I, sec. II, memb. 1, subsect. 3)
        [Imagination]

Cookery is become an art, a noble science; cooks are gentlemen.
      - Anatomy of Melancholy
         (pt. I, sec. II, memb. 2, subsec. 2)
        [Cookery]

As much valour is to be found in feasting as in fighting, and some of our city captains and carpet knights will make this good, and prove it.
      - Anatomy of Melancholy
         (pt. I, sec. II, memb. 2, subsect. 2)
        [Festivities]

For idleness is an appendix to nobility.
      - Anatomy of Melancholy
         (pt. I, sec. II, memb. 2, subsect. 6)
        [Idleness]

And were it not that they are loath to lay out money on a rope, they would be hanged forthwith, and sometimes die to save charges.
      - Anatomy of Melancholy
         (pt. I, sec. II, memb. 3, subsec. 12)
        [Misers]

A mere madness, to live like a wretch, and die rich.
      - Anatomy of Melancholy
         (pt. I, sec. II, memb. 3, subsec. 13)
        [Misers]

A nightingale dies for shame if another bird sings better.
      - Anatomy of Melancholy
         (pt. I, sec. II, memb. 3, subsec. 6)
        [Shame]

All our geese are swans.
      - Anatomy of Melancholy
         (pt. I, sec. II, memb. 3, subsect. 14)
        [Swans]

They are proud in humility, proud in that they are not proud.
      - Anatomy of Melancholy
         (pt. I, sec. II, memb. 3, subsect. 14)
        [Pride]

Why doth one man's yawning make another yawn?
      - Anatomy of Melancholy
         (pt. I, sec. II, memb. 3, subsect. 2)
        [Example]

I may not here omit those two main plagues, and common dotages of human kind, wine and women, which have infatuated and besotted myriads of people: they go commonly together.
      - Anatomy of Melancholy
         (pt. I, sec. II, memb. 3, subsect. XIII)
        [Temptation]

Aristotle said , , , melancholy men of all others are most witty.
      - Anatomy of Melancholy
         (pt. I, sec. III, memb. 1, subsect. 3)
        [Wit]

From this it appears how much more cruel the pen may be than the sword.
  [Lat., Hinc quam sit calamus saevior euse, patet.]
      - Anatomy of Melancholy
         (pt. I, sec. XXI, mem. 4, subsec. 4)
        [Pen]

[Witches] steal young children out of their cradles, ministerio doemonum, and put deformed in their rooms, which we call changelings.
      - Anatomy of Melancholy
         (pt. I, sect. II, memb. 1, subsect. 3)
        [Childhood]

'Tis a hydra's head contention; the more they strive the more they may: and as Praxiteles did by his glass, when he saw a scurvy face in it, brake it in pieces; but for that one he saw many more as bad in a moment.
      - Anatomy of Melancholy
         (pt. II, sc. 3, mem. 7) [Contention]

Go then merrily to Heaven.
      - Anatomy of Melancholy
         (pt. II, sec. 3, memb. 1) [Merriment]

So good things may be abused, and that which was first invented to refresh men's weary spirits.
      - Anatomy of Melancholy
         (pt. II, sec. II, mem. 4) [Amusements]

Many things happen between the cup and the lip.
      - Anatomy of Melancholy
         (pt. II, sec. II, memb. 3) [Fate]

Doth the moon care for the barking of a dog?
      - Anatomy of Melancholy
         (pt. II, sec. III, mem. 7) [Moon]

Set a beggar on horseback, and he will ride a gallop.
  [Set a beggar on horseback, and he'll outride the Devil.]
      - Anatomy of Melancholy
         (pt. II, sec. III, memb. 2) [Beggary]

All places are distant from heaven alike.
      - Anatomy of Melancholy
         (pt. II, sec. III, Memb. 4) [Heaven]

They have cheveril consciences that will stretch.
      - Anatomy of Melancholy
         (pt. II, sec. IV, memb. 2, subsect. 3)
        [Conscience]

Put his shoulder to the wheel.
      - Anatomy of Melancholy
         (pt. II, sect. I, memb. 2) [Action]


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