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WILLIAM HAZLITT (1)
English critic and author
(1778 - 1830)
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Unlimited power is helpless, as arbitrary power is capricious. Our energy is in proportion to the resistance it meets. We can attempt nothing great but from a sense of the difficulties we have to encounter; we can persevere in nothing great but from a pride in overcoming them.
      - [Power]

Vice, like disease, floats in the atmosphere.
      - [Vice]

Virtue may be said to steal, like a guilty thing, into the secret haunts of vice and infamy; it clings to their devoted victim, and will not be driven quite away. Nothing can destroy the human heart.
      - [Virtue]

Walk groundly, talk profoundly, drink roundly, sleep soundly.
      - [Sleep]

Want of principle is power. Truth and honesty set a limit to our efforts, which impudence and hypocrisy easily overleap.
      - [Power]

We all wear some disguise, make some professions, use some artifice, to set ourselves off as being better than we are; and yet it is not denied that we have some good intentions and praiseworthy qualities at bottom.
      - [Disguise]

We are governed by sympathy; and the extent of our sympathy is determined by that of our sensibility.
      - [Sympathy]

We are more jealous of frivolous accomplishments with brilliant success, than of the most estimable qualities without. Dr. Johnson envied Garrick, whom he despised, and ridiculed Goldsmith, whom he loved.
      - [Jealousy]

We are not hypocrites in our sleep.
      - [Dreams]

We are thankful for good-will rather than for services, for the motive than the quantum of favor received.
      - [Good Will]

We are very much what others think of us. The reception our observations meet with gives us courage to proceed or damps our efforts.
      - [Appreciation]

We can bear to be deprived of everything but our self-conceit.
      - [Self-conceit]

We do not die wholly at our deaths: we have mouldered away gradually long before. Faculty after faculty, interest after interest, attachment after attachment disappear; we are torn from ourselves while living, year after year sees us no longer the same, and death only consigns the last fragment of what we were to the grave.
      - [Death]

We do not like our friends the worse because they sometimes give us an opportunity to rail at them heartily. Their faults reconcile us to their virtues.
      - [Censure]

We go on a journey to be free of all impediments; to leave ourselves behind much more than to get rid of others.
      - [Traveling]

We grow tired of ourselves, much more of other people.
      - [Satiety]

We had rather do anything than acknowledge the merit of another if we can help it. We cannot bear a superior or an equal. Hence ridicule is sure to prevail over truth, for the malice of mankind, thrown into the scale, gives the casting weight.
      - [Envy]

We judge of others for the most part by their good opinion of themselves; yet nothing gives such offense or creates so many enemies, as that extreme self-complacency or superciliousness of manner, which appears to set the opinion of every one else at defiance.
      - [Conceit]

We may give more offense by our silence than even by impertinence.
      - [Silence]

We prefer a person with vivacity and high spirits, though bordering upon insolence, to the timid and pusillanimous; we are fonder of wit joined to malice than of dullness without it.
      - [Wit]

We talk little if we do not talk about ourselves.
      - [Talking]

We would willingly, and without remorse, sacrifice not only the present moment, but all the interval (no matter how long) that separates us from any favorite object.
      - [Impatience]

Weakness has its hidden resources, as well as strength. There is a degree of folly and meanness which we cannot calculate upon, and by which we are as much liable to be foiled as by the greatest ability or courage.
      - [Weakness]

What passes in the world for talent or dexterity or enterprise is often only a want of moral principle. We may succeed where others fail, not from a greater share of invention, but from not being nice in the choice of expedients.
      - [Enterprise]

Whatever excites the spirit of contradiction is capable of producing the last effects of heroism; which is only the highest pitch of obstinacy, in a good or bad cause, in wisdom or folly.
      - [Obstinacy]


Displaying page 9 of 11 for this author:   << Prev  Next >>  1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 [9] 10 11

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