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WILLIAM MAKEPEACE THACKERAY
English novelist, satirist and critic
(1811 - 1863)
  CHECK READING LIST (4)    << Prev Page    Displaying page 7 of 8    Next Page >> 

As the last bell struck, a peculiar sweet smile shone over his face, and he lifted up his head a little, and quickly said, "Adsum!" and fell back. It was the word we used at school, when names were called; and lo, he, whose heart was as that of a little child, had answered to his name, and stood in the presence of The Master.
      - Newcomes (bk. II, ch. XLII) [Words]

Remember, it is as easy to marry a rich woman as a poor woman.
      - Pendennis (bk. I, ch. XXVIII) [Matrimony]

It is best to love wisely, no doubt; but to love foolishly is better than not to be able to love at all.
      - Pendennis (ch. VI) [Love]

Mad as a hatter.
      - Pendennis (ch. X) [Insanity]

Although I enter not,
  Yet round about the spot
    Ofttimes I hover;
      And near the sacred gate,
        With longing eyes I wait,
          Expectant of her.
      - Pendennis--At the Church Gate
        [Expectation]

Ah, ye knights of the pen! May honour be your shield, and truth tip your lances! Be gentle to all gentle people. Be modest to women. Be tender to children. And as for the Ogre Humbug, out sword, and have at him!
      - Roundabout Papers--Ogres [Authorship]

And one man is as good as another--and a great dale betther, as the Irish philosopher said.
      - Roundabout Papers--On Ribbons [Character]

Titles are abolished; and the American Republic swarms with men claiming and bearing them.
      - Roundabout Papers--On Ribbons [Royalty]

On the day of the dinner of the Oystermongers' Company, what a noble speech I thought of in the cab!
      - Roundabout Papers--On Two Papers I intended to write
        [Speech]

Ah me! we wound where we never intended to strike; we create anger where we never meant harm; and these thoughts are the thorns in our cushion.
      - Roundabout Papers--The Thorn in the Cushion
        [Wounds]

The thorn in the cushion of the editorial chair.
      - Roundabout Papers--The Thorn in the Cushion
        [Journalism]

A humble flower long time I pined
  Upon the solitary plain,
    And trembled at the angry wind,
      And shrunk before the bitter rain.
        And oh! 'twas in a blessed hour
          A passing wanderer chanced to see,
            And, pitying the lonely flower,
              To stoop and gather me.
      - Song of the Violet [Violets]

He fought a thousand glorious wars,
  And more than half the world was his,
    And somewhere, now, in yonder stars,
      Can tell, mayhap, what greatness is.
      - The Chronicle of the Drum (last verse)
        [Greatness]

The play is done; the curtain drops,
  Slow falling to the prompter's bell;
    A moment yet the actor stops,
      And looks around, to say farewell.
        It is an irksome work and task;
          And, when he's laughed and said his say,
            He shows, as he removes the mask,
              A face that's anything but gay.
      - The End of the Play [Acting]

When Francis, fourth Viscount Castlewood, came to his title, and presently after to take possession of his house of Castlewood, County Hants, in the year 1691, almost the only tenant of the place besides the domestics was a lad of twelve years of age, of whom no one seemed to take any note until my Lady Viscountess lighted upon him, going over the house with the housekeeper on the day of her arrival.
      - The History of Henry Esmond
        [Books (First Lines)]

Christmas is here:
  Winds whistle shrill,
    Icy and chill,
      Little care we:
        Little we fear
          Weather without,
            Sheltered about
              The Mahogany-Tree.
      - The Mahogany-Tree [Christmas]

Since the days of Adam, there has been hardly a mischief done in this world but a woman has been at the bottom of it.
      - The Memoirs of Barry Lyndon
        [Books (First Lines)]

A crow, who had flown away with a cheese from a dairy window, sate perched on a tree looking down at a great big frog in a pool underneath him.
      - The Newcomes [Books (First Lines)]

Werther had a love for Charlotte,
  Such as words could never utter;
    Would you know how first he met her?
      She was cutting bread and butter.
      - The Sorrows of Werther [Love]

On deck beneath the awning,
  I dozing lay and yawning;
    It was the gray of dawning,
      Ere yet the Sun arose;
        And above the funnel's roaring,
          And the fitful wind's deploring,
            I heard the cabin snoring
              With universal noise.
      - The White Squall [Navigation]

Know ye the willow-tree,
  Whose grey leaves quiver,
    Whispering gloomily
      To yon pale river?
        Lady at even-tide
          Wander not near it:
            They say its branches hide
              A sad, lost spirit!
      - The Willow-Tree [Willow]

The world is a looking-glass, and gives back to every man the reflection of his own face. Frown at it and it will in turn look sourly upon you; laugh at it and with it, and it is a jolly kind companion.
      - Vanity Fair [World]

While the present century was in its teens, and on one sunshiny morning in June, there drove up to the great iron gate of Miss Pinkerton's academy for young ladies, on Chiswick Mall, a large family coach, with two fat horses in blazing harness, driven by a fat coachman in a three-cornered hat and wig, at the rate of four miles an hour.
      - Vanity Fair [Books (First Lines)]

This I set down as a positive truth. A woman with fair opportunities and without a positive hump, may marry whom she likes.
      - Vanity Fair (ch. IV) [Matrimony]

Mother is the name for God in the lips and hearts of children.
      - Vanity Fair (vol. II, ch. XII)
        [Motherhood : Mothers]


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