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Proverbs
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[ Also see Catchphrases Laws of Life and Nature Old Sayings Proverbial Phrases Proverbs (General) ]

Give me the ocular proof.
      - William Shakespeare,
        Othello the Moor of Venice
         (Othello at III, iii)

He that filches from me my good name
  Robs me of that, which not enriches him,
    And makes me poor indeed.
      - William Shakespeare,
        Othello the Moor of Venice
         (Iago at III, iii)

He that is robb'd, not wanting what is stolen,
  Let him not know it, and he's not robb'd at all.
      - William Shakespeare,
        Othello the Moor of Venice
         (Othello at III, iii)

Honesty's a fool
  And loses that it works for.
      - William Shakespeare,
        Othello the Moor of Venice
         (Iago at III, iii)

I found not Cassio's kisses on her lips.
      - William Shakespeare,
        Othello the Moor of Venice
         (Othello at III, iii)

Poor and content is rich, and rich enough;
  But riches fineless is as poor as winter
    To him that ever fears he shall be poor.
      - William Shakespeare,
        Othello the Moor of Venice
         (Iago at III, iii)

The shrill trump,
  The spirit-stirring drum, the ear-piercing fife.
      - William Shakespeare,
        Othello the Moor of Venice
         (Othello at III, iii)

There are a kind of men so loose of soul,
  That in their sleeps will mutter their affairs.
      - William Shakespeare,
        Othello the Moor of Venice
         (Iago at III, iii)

Trifles light as air
  Are to the jealous confirmations strong
    As proofs of holy writ.
      - William Shakespeare,
        Othello the Moor of Venice
         (Iago at III, iii)

Who steals my purse steals trash; 'tis something, nothing.
  'Twas mine, 'tis his, and has been slave to thousands;
    But he that filches from me my good name
      Robs me of that which not enriches him
        And makes me poor indeed.
      - William Shakespeare,
        Othello the Moor of Venice
         (Iago at III, iii)

Sir, she can turn, and turn, and yet go on,
  And turn again.
      - William Shakespeare,
        Othello the Moor of Venice
         (Othello at IV, i)

They laugh that win!
      - William Shakespeare,
        Othello the Moor of Venice
         (Othello at IV, i)

'Tis neither here nor there.
      - William Shakespeare,
        Othello the Moor of Venice
         (Emilia at IV, iii)

I kissed thee, ere I killed thee.
      - William Shakespeare,
        Othello the Moor of Venice
         (Othello at V, ii)

Few love to hear the sins they love to act.
      - William Shakespeare,
        Pericles Prince of Tyre
         (Pericles at I, i)

Great king,
  Few love to hear the sins they love to act.
      - William Shakespeare,
        Pericles Prince of Tyre
         (Pericles at I, i)

Tyrants' fears
  Decrease not, but grow faster than their years.
      - William Shakespeare,
        Pericles Prince of Tyre
         (Pericles at I, ii)

One sorrow never comes but brings an heir,
  That may succeed as his inheritor.
      - William Shakespeare,
        Pericles Prince of Tyre (Cleon at I, iv)

One sorrow never comes but brings an heir,
  That may succeed as his inheritor;
    And so in ours, some neighboring nation,
      Taking advantage of our misery,
        Hath stuffed the hollow vessels with their power,
          To beat us down, the which are down already;
            And make a conquest of unhappy,
              Whereas no glory 's got to overcome.
      - William Shakespeare,
        Pericles Prince of Tyre (Cleon at I, iv)

One fire burns out another's burning,
  One pain is lessen'd by another's anguish;
    Turn giddy and be holp by backward turning;
      One desperate grief cures with another's languish.
      - William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet
         (Benvolio at I, ii)

Take thou some new infection to thy eye,
  And the rank poison of the old will die.
      - William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet
         (Benvolio at I, ii)

Come, we burn daylight, ho!
  Nay, that's not so.
    I mean, sir, in delay
      We waste our lights in vain, like lamps by day.
      - William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet
         (Mercutio & Romeo & Mercutio at I, iv)

Here beauty hangs upon the cheek of night,
  Like a rich jewel in an Ethiop's ear.
      - William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet
         (Romeo at I, v)

And what love can do, that does love attempt.
      - William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet
         (Romeo at II, ii)

At lovers' perjuries,
  They say Jove laughs.
      - William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet
         (Juliet at II, ii)

He jests at scars that never felt a wound.
      - William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet
         (Romeo at II, ii)

I would have thee gone,
  And yet no further than a wanton's bird,
    Who lets it hop a little from her hand,
      Like a poor prisoner in his twisted gyves,
        And with a silk thread plucks it back again.
      - William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet
         (Juliet at II, ii)

What's in a name?
      - William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet
         (Juliet at II, ii)

What's in a name? That which we call a rose by any other name would smell as sweet.
      - William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet
         (Juliet at II, ii)

Care keeps his watch in every old man's eye,
  And where care lodges, sleep will never lie;
    But where unbruised youth with unstuffed brain
      Doth couch his limbs, there golden sleep doth reign.
      - William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet
         (Friar Laurence at II, iii)

Care keeps his watch in every old man's eye.
      - William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet
         (Friar Laurence at II, iii)

Nought so vile, that on the earth doth live,
  But to the earth some special good cloth give.
      - William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet
         (Friar Laurence at II, iii)

The sweetest honey
  Is loathsome in his own deliciousness.
      - William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet
         (Friar Laurence at II, vi)

The sweetest honey
  Is loathsome in his own deliciousness
    And in the taste confounds the appetite.
      - William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet
         (Friar Laurence at II, vi)

Too swift arrives as tardy as too slow.
      - William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet
         (Friar Laurence at II, vi)

Adversity's sweet milk, philosophy.
      - William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet
         (Friar Laurence at III, iii)

Night's candles are burnt out, and jocund day
  Stands tiptoe on the misty mountain-tops.
      - William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet
         (Romeo at III, v)

The roses in thy lips and cheeks shall fade
  To paly ashes.
      - William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet
         (Friar Laurence at IV, i)

Confusion's cure lives not
  In these confusions.
      - William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet
         (Friar Laurence at IV, v)

My poverty, but not my will consents.
      - William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet
         (Apothecary at V, i)

O churl! drink all; and leave no friendly drop!
      - William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet
         (Juliet at V, iii)

Loathsome canker lives in sweetest bud.
      - William Shakespeare, Sonnet XXXV

Ay, sir, and wherefore; for they say every why hath a wherefore.
      - William Shakespeare, The Comedy of Errors
         (Dromio of Syracuse at II, ii)

For emulation hath a thousand sons
  That one by one pursue.
      - William Shakespeare,
        The History of Troilus and Cressida
         (Ulysses at III, iii)

To have done, is to hang
  Quite out of fashion, like a rusty mail
    In monumental mockery.
      - William Shakespeare,
        The History of Troilus and Cressida
         (Ulysses at III, iii)

The end crowns all,
  And that old common arbitrator, Time,
    Will one day end it.
      - William Shakespeare,
        The History of Troilus and Cressida
         (Hector at IV, v)

Thou wear a lion's hide! doff it for shame,
  And hang a calf's skin on those recreant limbs.
      - William Shakespeare,
        The Life and Death of King John
         (Constance at III, i)

Life is as tedious as a twice-told tale,
  Vexing the dull ear of a drowsy man,
    And bitter shame hath spoiled the sweet world's taste,
      That it yields nought but shame and bitterness.
      - William Shakespeare,
        The Life and Death of King John
         (Lewis at III, iv)

Life is as tedious as a twice-told tale.
      - William Shakespeare,
        The Life and Death of King John
         (Lewis at III, iv)

And, oftentimes, excusing of a fault,
  Doth make the fault the worse by the excuse.
      - William Shakespeare,
        The Life and Death of King John
         (Pembroke at IV, ii)


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