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Proverbs
 << Prev Page    Displaying page 405 of 414    Next Page >> 
[ Also see Catchphrases Laws of Life and Nature Old Sayings Proverbial Phrases Proverbs (General) ]

How oft the sight of means to do ill deeds
  Makes ill deeds done.
      - William Shakespeare,
        The Life and Death of King John
         (King John at IV, ii)

With taper-light
  To seek the beauteous eye of heaven to garnish.
      - William Shakespeare,
        The Life and Death of King John
         (Salisbury at IV, ii)

Trust not those cunning waters of his eyes,
  For villany is not without such rheum.
      - William Shakespeare,
        The Life and Death of King John
         (Salisbury at IV, iii)

Be stirring as the time, be fire with fire;
  Threaten the threat'ner, and outface the brow
    Of bragging horror.
      - William Shakespeare,
        The Life and Death of King John
         (Bastard at V, i)

Anger is like
  A full hot horse, who being allowed his way,
    Self-mettle tires him.
      - William Shakespeare,
        The Life of King Henry the Eighth
         (Norfolk at I, i)

Heat not a furnace for your foe so hot
  That it doth singe yourself.
      - William Shakespeare,
        The Life of King Henry the Eighth
         (Norfolk at I, i)

To climb steep hills
  Requires slow pace at first.
      - William Shakespeare,
        The Life of King Henry the Eighth
         (Norfolk at I, i)

We may outrun,
  By violent swiftness, that which we run at,
    And lose by over-running.
      - William Shakespeare,
        The Life of King Henry the Eighth
         (Norfolk at I, i)

New customs,
  Though they be never so ridiculous,
    (Nay, let 'em be unmanly), yet are followed.
      - William Shakespeare,
        The Life of King Henry the Eighth
         (Sandys at I, iii)

Our content
  Is our best having.
      - William Shakespeare,
        The Life of King Henry the Eighth
         (Old Lady at II, ii)

Alas! sir,
  In what have I offended you? What cause
    Hath my behaviour given to your displeasure?
      - William Shakespeare,
        The Life of King Henry the Eighth
         (Queen Katharine at II, iv)

A peace above all earthly dignities,
  A still and quiet conscience.
      - William Shakespeare,
        The Life of King Henry the Eighth
         (Wolsey at III, ii)

By that sin fell the angels.
      - William Shakespeare,
        The Life of King Henry the Eighth
         (Wolsey at III, ii)

I know myself now, and I feel within me
  A peace above all earthly dignities,
    A still and quiet conscience.
      - William Shakespeare,
        The Life of King Henry the Eighth
         (Wolsey at III, ii)

My high-blown pride
  At length broke under me, and now has left me
    Weary and old with service.
      - William Shakespeare,
        The Life of King Henry the Eighth
         (Wolsey at III, ii)

O how wretched
  Is that poor man that hangs on princes' favours!
      - William Shakespeare,
        The Life of King Henry the Eighth
         (Wolsey at III, ii)

Men's evil manners live in brass; their virtues
  We write in water.
      - William Shakespeare,
        The Life of King Henry the Eighth
         (Griffith at IV, ii)

But we are all men
  In our own natures frail.
      - William Shakespeare,
        The Life of King Henry the Eighth
         (Chancellor at V, iii)

A fool's bolt is soon shot.
      - William Shakespeare,
        The Life of King Henry the Fifth
         (Orleans at III, vii)

There is some soul of goodness in things evil,
  Would men observingly distill it out;
    For our bad neighbor makes us early stirrers,
      Which is both healthful, and good husbandry.
      - William Shakespeare,
        The Life of King Henry the Fifth
         (King Henry at IV, i)

The fire i' the flint
  Shows not till it be struck.
      - William Shakespeare,
        The Life of TImon of Athens
         (Poet at I, i)

Men shut their doors against the setting sun.
      - William Shakespeare,
        The Life of Timon of Athens
         (Apemantus at I, ii)

O, that men's ears should be
  To counsel deaf, but not to flattery!
      - William Shakespeare,
        The Life of Timon of Athens
         (Apemantus at I, ii)

Ah! when the means are gone that buy this praise,
  The breath is gone whereof this praise is made.
      - William Shakespeare,
        The Life of Timon of Athens
         (Flavius at II, ii)

Nothing emboldens sin so much as mercy.
      - William Shakespeare,
        The Life of Timon of Athens
         (First Senator at III, v)

Who would not wish to be from wealth exempt,
  Since riches point to misery and contempt?
      - William Shakespeare,
        The Life of Timon of Athens
         (Flavius at IV, ii)

What an alteration of honour has
  Desperate want made!
      - William Shakespeare,
        The Life of Timon of Athens
         (Flavius at IV, iii)

Let me play the fool;
  With mirth and laughter let old wrinkles come.
      - William Shakespeare,
        The Merchant of Venice
         (Gratiano at I, i)   BUY VARYING HARE USED BOOK  

My ventures are not in one bottom trusted.
      - William Shakespeare,
        The Merchant of Venice (Antonio at I, i)   BUY VARYING HARE USED BOOK  

In a bondsman's key,
  With bated breath and whispering humbleness.
      - William Shakespeare,
        The Merchant of Venice
         (Shylock at I, iii)   BUY VARYING HARE USED BOOK  

Oh what a goodly outside falsehood hath!
      - William Shakespeare,
        The Merchant of Venice
         (Antonio at I, iii)   BUY VARYING HARE USED BOOK  

Sufferance is the badge of all our tribe.
      - William Shakespeare,
        The Merchant of Venice
         (Shylock at I, iii)   BUY VARYING HARE USED BOOK  

The devil can cite Scripture for his purpose.
      - William Shakespeare,
        The Merchant of Venice
         (Antonio at I, iii)   BUY VARYING HARE USED BOOK  

The devil hath power
  To assume a pleasing shape.
      - William Shakespeare,
        The Merchant of Venice
         (Antonio at I, iii)   BUY VARYING HARE USED BOOK  

Whose own hard dealings teaches them suspect
  The thoughts of others.
      - William Shakespeare,
        The Merchant of Venice
         (Shylock at I, iii)   BUY VARYING HARE USED BOOK  

He that hath the grace of God, hath wealth enough.
      - William Shakespeare,
        The Merchant of Venice
         (Launcelot at II, ii)   BUY VARYING HARE USED BOOK  

In the end truth will out.
      - William Shakespeare,
        The Merchant of Venice
         (Launcelot at II, ii)   BUY VARYING HARE USED BOOK  

What a beard hast thou got! thou hast got more hair on thy chin than Dobbin my thill-horse has on his tail.
      - William Shakespeare,
        The Merchant of Venice (Gobbo at II, ii)   BUY VARYING HARE USED BOOK  

Fast bind, fast find--
  A proverb never stale in thrifty mind.
      - William Shakespeare,
        The Merchant of Venice
         (Shylock at II, v)   BUY VARYING HARE USED BOOK  

Yet gold all is not that doth golden seem.
      - William Shakespeare,
        The Merchant of Venice
         (Morocco at II, vii), (altered)   BUY VARYING HARE USED BOOK  

Young in limbs, in judgment old.
      - William Shakespeare,
        The Merchant of Venice
         (Morocco at II, vii)   BUY VARYING HARE USED BOOK  

Hanging and wiving goes by destiny.
      - William Shakespeare,
        The Merchant of Venice
         (Nerissa at II,ix)   BUY VARYING HARE USED BOOK  

How many cowards whose hearts are all as false
  As stairs of sand, wear yet upon their chins
    The beards of Hercules and frowning Mars,
      Who inward searched, have livers white as milk!
      - William Shakespeare,
        The Merchant of Venice
         (Bassanio at III, ii)   BUY VARYING HARE USED BOOK  

It is engendered in the eyes;
  By gazing fed; and fancy dies
    In the cradle where it lies.
      - William Shakespeare,
        The Merchant of Venice
         (Portia at III, ii), a song   BUY VARYING HARE USED BOOK  

So may the outward shows be least themselves;
  The world is still deceived with ornament.
      - William Shakespeare,
        The Merchant of Venice
         (Bassanio at III, ii)   BUY VARYING HARE USED BOOK  

So may the outward shows be least themselves;
  The world is still deceived with ornament.
    In law, what plea so tainted and corrupt
      But being seasoned with a gracious voice,
        Obscures the show of evil? In religion,
          What damned error but some sober brow
            Will bless it and approve it with a text,
              Hiding the grossness with fair ornament?
      - William Shakespeare,
        The Merchant of Venice
         (Bassanio at III, ii)   BUY VARYING HARE USED BOOK  

There is no vice so simple, but assumes
  Some mark of virtue on his outward parts.
      - William Shakespeare,
        The Merchant of Venice
         (Bassanio at III, ii)   BUY VARYING HARE USED BOOK  

A Daniel come to judgment! yea, a Daniel!
      - William Shakespeare,
        The Merchant of Venice
         (Shylock at IV, i)   BUY VARYING HARE USED BOOK  

A Daniel still say I, a second Daniel!
  I thank thee, Jew, for teaching me that word.
      - William Shakespeare,
        The Merchant of Venice
         (Gratiano at IV, i)   BUY VARYING HARE USED BOOK  

I thank thee, Jew, for teaching me that word.
      - William Shakespeare,
        The Merchant of Venice
         (Gratiano at IV, i)   BUY VARYING HARE USED BOOK  


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