GIGA THE MOST EXTENSIVE
COLLECTION OF
QUOTATIONS
ON THE INTERNET
Google
Search GIGA
Loading
Home
Page
GIGA
Quotes
Biographical
Name Index
Chronological
Name Index
Topic
List
Reading
List
Site
Notes
Varying Hare
Books
Crossword
Solver
Anagram
Solver
Subanagram
Solver
TOPICS:          A   B   C   D   E   F   G   H   I   J   K   L   M   N   O   P   Q   R   S   T   U   V   W   X   Y   Z
PEOPLE:    #   A   B   C   D   E   F   G   H   I   J   K   L   M   N   O   P   Q   R   S   T   U   V   W   X   Y   Z


JOSEPH ADDISON
English essayist, poet and statesman
(1672 - 1719)
  Displaying page 1 of 18    Next Page >> 

A beautiful eye makes silence eloquent, a kind eye makes contradiction an assent, an enraged eye makes beauty deformed. This little member gives life to every other part about us; and I believe the story of Argus implies no more than that the eye is in every part; that is to say, every other part would be mutilated were not its force represented more by the eye than even by itself.
      - [Eyes]

A brother's sufferings claim a brother's pity.
      - [Sympathy]

A cheerful temper joined with innocence will make beauty attractive, knowledge delightful and wit good-natured.
      - in the "Tatler", no. 192 [Cheerfulness]

A cloudy day, or a little sunshine, have as great an influence on many constitutions as the most real blessings or misfortunes.
      - [Influence]

A cobbler, . . . produced several new grins of his own invention, having been used to cut faces for many years together over his last.
      - in the "Spectator", no. 173 [Shoemaking]

A contemplation of God's works, a generous concern for the good of mankind, and the unfeigned exercise of humility only, denominate men great and glorious.
      - [Greatness]

A contented mind is the greatest blessing a man can enjoy in this world; and if in the present life his happiness arises from the subduing of his desires, it will arise in the next from the gratification of them.
      - [Contentment]

A few persons of an odious and despised country could not have filled the world with believers, had they not shown undoubted credentials from the divine person who sent them on such a message.
      - [Christianity]

A fine coat is but a livery when the person who wears it discovers no higher sense than that of a footman.
      - [Dress]

A friend exaggerates a man's virtues; an enemy inflames his crimes.
      - [Enemies]

A friendship that makes the least noise is very often the most useful; for which reason I should prefer a prudent friend to a zealous one.
      - [Friendship]

A good character, good habits, and iron industry are impregnable to the assaults of all the ill-luck that fools ever dreamed of.
      - [Luck]

A good conscience is to the soul what health is to the body; it preserves a constant ease and serenity within us, and more than countervails all the calamities and afflictions that can possibly befall us.
      - [Conscience]

A just and reasonable modesty does not only recommend eloquence, but sets off every great talent which a man can be possessed of.
      - [Modesty]

A man improves more by reading the story of a person eminent for prudence and virtue, than by the finest rules and precepts of morality.
      - [Example]

A man may smoke, or drink, or take snuff, till he is unable to pass away his time without it, not to mention how our delight in any particular study, art, or science, rises and improves in proportion to the application which we bestow upon it. Thus, what was at first an exercise, becomes at length an entertainment.
      - [Study]

A man must be both stupid and uncharitable who believes there is no virtue or truth but on his own side.
      - [Unreasonableness]

A man must be excessively stupid, as well as uncharitable, who believes there is no virtue but on his own side.
      - [Bigotry]

A man should always consider how much more unhappy he might be than he is.
      - [Unhappiness]

A man who has any relish for fine writing either discovers new beauties or receives stronger impressions from the masterly strokes of a great author every time he peruses him; besides that he naturally wears himself into the same manner of speaking and thinking.
      - [Reading]

A man who is furnished with arguments from the mint will convince his antagonist much sooner than one who draws them from reason and philosophy.
      - [Argument]

A man with great talents, but void of discretion, is like Polyphemus in the fable, strong and blind, endued with an irresistible force, which for want of sight is of no use to him.
      - [Talent]

A man's reputation draws eyes upon him that will narrowly inspect every part of him.
      - [Reputation]

A money-lender. He serves you in the present tense; he lends you in the conditional mood; keeps you in the subjunctive; and ruins you in the future!
      - [Usury]

A religious hope does not only bear up the mind under her sufferings but makes her rejoice in them.
      - [Hope]


Displaying page 1 of 18 for this author:   Next >>  [1] 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18

 WWW.GIGA-USA.COM     Back to Top of Page 
The GIGA name and the GIGA logo are trademarks registered in the United States Patent and Trademark Office.
GIGA-USA and GIGA-USA.COM are servicemarks of the domain owner.
Copyright © 1999-2013 John C. Shepard. All Rights Reserved.
Last Revised: 2013 March 16
Click > HERE < to report errors

Buy a good book from
Varying Hare Books