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JOSEPH ADDISON
English essayist, poet and statesman
(1672 - 1719)
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If the minds of men were laid open, we should see but little difference between them and that of the fool; there are infinite reveries and numberless extravagancies pass through both.
      - [Mind]

If we look into communities and divisions of men, we observe that the discreet man, not the witty, nor the learned, nor the brave, guides the conversation, and gives measure to society.
      - [Discretion]

If we may believe our logicians, man is distinguished from all other creatures by the faculty of laughter.
      - [Laughter]

If you wish success in life, make perseverance your bosom friend, experience your wise counselor, caution your elder brother, and hope your guardian genius.
      - [Success]

In all thy humors, whether grave or mellow,
  Thou'rt such a touchy, testy, pleasant fellow,
    Hast so much wit and mirth, and spleen about thee,
      That there's no living with thee, nor without thee.
      - [Friends]

In England we see people lulled sleep with solid and elaborate discourses of piety, who would be warmed and transported out of themselves by the bellowings and distortions of enthusiasm.
      - [Preaching]

In love to our wives there is desire, to our sons there is ambition; but in that to our daughters there is something which there are no words to express.
      - [Parents]

In my Lucia's absence
  Life hangs upon me, and becomes a burden;
    I am ten times undone, while hope, and fear,
      And grief, and rage and love rise up at once,
        And with variety of pain distract me.
      - [Absence]

In private conversation between intimate friends, the wisest men very often talk like the weakest; for indeed the talking with a friend is nothing else but thinking aloud.
      - [Conversation]

In rising sighs and falling tears.
      - [Grief]

In short, heaven is not to be looked upon only as the reward, but as the natural effect, of a religious life.
      - [Heaven]

In that disputable point of persecuting men for conscience sake, I see such dreadful consequences rising, I would be as fully convinced of the truth of it, as a mathematical demonstration, before I would venture to act upon it or make it a part of my religion.
      - [Persecution]

In the common run of mankind, for one that is wise and good you find ten of a contrary character.
      - [Wisdom]

In the founders of great families, titles or attributes of honor are generally correspondent with the virtues of the person to whom they are applied; but in their descendants they are too often the marks rather of grandeur than of merit. The stamp and denomination still continue, but the intrinsic value is frequently lost.
      - [Ancestry]

In the loss of an object we do not proportion our grief to the real value it bears, but to the value our fancies set upon it.
      - [Fancy]

In the recognition of beauty, the eye takes the most delight in color.
      - [Beauty]

Instability of temper ought to be checked when it disposes men to wander from one scheme to another: since such a fickleness cannot but be attended with fatal consequences.
      - [Temper]

Irregularity and want of method are only supportable in men of great learning or genius, who are often too full to be exact, and therefore choose to throw down their pearls in heaps before the reader rather than be at the pains of stringing them.
      - [Method]

Irresolution on the schemes of life which offer themselves to our choice, and inconstancy in pursuing them, are the greatest causes of all our unhappiness.
      - [Irresolution]

It generally takes its rise either from an ill-will to mankind, a private inclination to make ourselves esteemed, an ostentation of wit, and vanity of being thought in the secrets of the world; or from a desire of gratifying any of these dispositions of mind in those persons with whom we converse.
      - [Scandal]

It happened very providentially, to the honor of the Christian religion, that it did not take its rise in the dark illiterate ages of the world, but at a time when arts and sciences were at their height.
      - [Christianity]

It has been said in praise of some men, that they could take whole hours together upon anything; but it must be owned to the honor of the other sex that there are many among them who can talk whole hours together upon nothing. I have known a woman branch out into a long extempore dissertation on the edging of a petticoat, and chide her servant for breaking a china cup, in all the figures of rhetoric.
      - [Talking]

It is a celebrated thought of Socrates, that if all the misfortunes of mankind were cast into a public stock, in order to be equally distributed among the whole species, those who now think themselves the most unhappy would prefer the share they are already possessed of, before that which would fall to them by such a division.
      - [Misfortune]

It is a fine simile in one of Mr. Congreve's prologues which compares a writer to a battering gamester that stakes all his winnings upon one cast, so that if he loses the last throw he is sure to be undone.
      - [Authorship]

It is a folly for an eminent man to think of escaping censure, and a weakness to be affected with it. All the illustrious persons of antiquity, and indeed of every age in the world, have passed through this fiery persecution. There is no defense against reproach but obscurity; it is a kind of concomitant to greatness, as satires and invectives were an essential part of a Roman triumph.
      - [Censure]


Displaying page 6 of 18 for this author:   << Prev  Next >>  1 2 3 4 5 [6] 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18

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