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WILLIAM HAZLITT (1)
English critic and author
(1778 - 1830)
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No young man believes he shall ever die.
      - [Death]

Nothing gives such a blow to friendship as the detecting another in an untruth. It strikes at the root of our confidence ever after.
      - [Falsehood]

Nothing precludes sympathy so much as a perfect indifference to it.
      - [Sympathy]

Of all virtues, magnanimity is the rarest. There are a hundred persons of merit for one who willingly acknowledges it in another.
      - [Magnanimity]

One is always more vexed at losing a game of any sort by a single hole or ace, than if one has never had a chance of winning it.
      - [Losing]

One shining quality lends a luster to another, or hides some glaring defect.
      - [Quality]

Our energy is in proportion to the resistance it meets. We can attempt nothing great but from a sense of the difficulties we have to encounter; we can persevere in nothing great but from a pride in overcoming them.
      - [Difficulties]

Our opinions are not our own, but in the power of sympathy. If a person tells us a palpable falsehood, we not only dare not contradict him, but we dare hardly disbelieve him to his face. A lie boldly uttered has the effect of truth for the instant.
      - [Lying]

Our repugnance to death increases in proportion to our consciousness of having lived in vain.
      - [Death]

People addicted to secrecy are so without knowing why; they are not so for cause, but for secrecy's sake.
      - [Secrecy]

People do not persist in their vices because they are not weary of them, but because they cannot leave them off. It is the nature of vice to leave us no resource but in itself.
      - [Vice]

Perhaps propriety is as near a word as any to denote the manners of the gentleman; elegance is necessary to the fine gentleman; dignity is proper to noblemen; and majesty to kings.
      - [Gentlemen]

Popularity disarms envy in well-disposed minds. Those are ever the most ready to do justice to others who feel that the world has done them justice. When success has not this effect in opening the mind, it is a sign that it has been ill deserved.
      - [Politics]

Poverty is the test of civility and the touchstone of friendship.
      - [Poverty]

Poverty, labor, and calamity are not without their luxuries, which the rich, the indolent, and the fortunate in vain seek for.
      - [Poverty]

Poverty, when it is voluntary, is never despicable, but takes an heroical aspect.
      - [Poverty]

Prejudice is never easy unless it can pass itself off for reason.
      - [Prejudice]

Prejudice is the child of ignorance.
      - [Prejudice]

Pride is founded not on the sense of happiness, but on the sense of power.
      - [Pride]

Principle is a passion for truth.
      - [Principles]

Prosperity is a great teacher; adversity is a greater. Possession pampers the mind; privation trains and strengthens it.
      - [Adversity]

Refinement creates beauty everywhere. It is the grossness of the spectator that discovers anything like grossness in the object.
      - [Refinement]

Reflection brakes men cowards. There is no object that can be put in competition with life, unless it is viewed through the medium of passion, and we are hurried away by the impulse of the moment.
      - [Reflection]

Repose is as necessary in conversation as in a picture.
      - [Conversation]

Sheridan once said of some speech, in his acute, sarcastic way, that "it contained a great deal both of what was new and what was true; but that unfortunately what was new was not true, and what was true was not new.
      - [Speech]


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