GIGA THE MOST EXTENSIVE
COLLECTION OF
QUOTATIONS
ON THE INTERNET
Google
Search GIGA
Loading
Home
Page
GIGA
Quotes
Biographical
Name Index
Biographical
Name List
Chronological
Name Index
Topic
List
Reading
List
Site
Notes
Varying Hare
Books
Crossword
Solver
Anagram
Solver
SubAnagram
Solver
TOPICS:          A   B   C   D   E   F   G   H   I   J   K   L   M   N   O   P   Q   R   S   T   U   V   W   X   Y   Z
PEOPLE:    #   A   B   C   D   E   F   G   H   I   J   K   L   M   N   O   P   Q   R   S   T   U   V   W   X   Y   Z


Proverbs
 << Prev Page    Displaying page 403 of 414    Next Page >> 
[ Also see Catchphrases Laws of Life and Nature Old Sayings Proverbial Phrases Proverbs (General) ]

So from that spring, whence comfort seem'd to come,
  Discomfort swells.
      - William Shakespeare, Macbeth
         (Sergeant at I, ii)

Present fears
  Are less than horrible imaginings.
      - William Shakespeare, Macbeth
         (Macbeth at I, iii)

Win us with honest trifles, to betray us
  In deepest consequence.
      - William Shakespeare, Macbeth
         (Banquo at I, iii)

I dare do all that may become a man;
  Who dares do more is none.
      - William Shakespeare, Macbeth
         (Macbeth at I, vii)

This even-handed justice
  Commends th' ingredience of our poisoned chalice
    To our own lips.
      - William Shakespeare, Macbeth
         (Macbeth at I, vii)

We but teach
  Bloody instructions, which, being taught, return
    To plague the inventor.
      - William Shakespeare, Macbeth
         (Macbeth at I, vii)

Whence is that knocking?
  How is't with me, when every noise appals me?
      - William Shakespeare, Macbeth
         (Macbeth at II, ii)

Things bad begun make strong themselves by ill.
      - William Shakespeare, Macbeth
         (Macbeth at III, ii)

Thou marvell'st at my words, but hold thee still;
  Things bad begun make strong themselves by ill.
      - William Shakespeare, Macbeth
         (Macbeth at III, ii)

We have scorched the snake, not killed it.
  She'll close and be herself, whilst our poor malice
    Remains in danger of her former tooth.
      - William Shakespeare, Macbeth
         (Macbeth at III, ii)

Things at the worst will cease, or e'en climb upward
  To what they were before.
      - William Shakespeare, Macbeth
         (Ross at IV, ii)

Give sorrow words; the grief that does not speak
  Whispers the o'erfraught heart, and bids it break.
      - William Shakespeare, Macbeth
         (Malcolm at IV, iii)

What's done cannot be undone.
      - William Shakespeare, Macbeth
         (Lady Macbeth at V, i)

It is a tale
  Told by an idiot, full of sound and fury,
    Signifying nothing.
      - William Shakespeare, Macbeth
         (Macbeth at V, v)

To-morrow, and to-morrow, and to-morrow,
  Creeps in this petty pace from day to day,
    To the last syllable of recorded time,
      And all our yesterdays have lighted fools
        The way to dusty death.
      - William Shakespeare, Macbeth
         (Macbeth at V, v)

In time the rod
  Becomes more mocked than feared.
      - William Shakespeare, Measure for Measure
         (Vincentio, the Duke at I, iii)

Our doubts are traitors,
  And make us lose the good we oft might win,
    By fearing to attempt.
      - William Shakespeare, Measure for Measure
         (Lucio at I, iv)

Some rise by sin, and some by virtue fall.
      - William Shakespeare, Measure for Measure
         (Escalus at II, i)

Some rise by sin, and some by virtue fall:
  Some run from breaks of ice, and answer none,
    And some condemned for a fault alone.
      - William Shakespeare, Measure for Measure
         (Escalus at II, i)

But man, proud man,
  Drest in a little brief authority,--
    Plays such fantastic tricks before high heaven
      As make the angels weep.
      - William Shakespeare, Measure for Measure
         (Isabella at II, ii)

Condemn the fault, but not the actor of it.
      - William Shakespeare, Measure for Measure
         (Angelo at II, ii)

That in the captain's but a choleric word,
  Which in the soldier is flat blasphemy.
      - William Shakespeare, Measure for Measure
         (Isabella at II, ii)

The miserable have no other medicine,
  But only hope:
    I have hope to live, and am prepared to die.
      - William Shakespeare, Measure for Measure
         (Claudio at III, i)

The sense of death is most in apprehension,
  And the poor beetle that we tread upon
    In corporal sufferance finds a pang as great
      As when a giant dies.
      - William Shakespeare, Measure for Measure
         (Isabella at III, i)

The sense of death is most in apprehension.
      - William Shakespeare, Measure for Measure
         (Isabella at III, i)

Craft against vice I must apply.
      - William Shakespeare, Measure for Measure
         (Vincentio, the Duke at III, ii)

No might nor greatness in mortality
  Can censure 'scape; back-wounding calumny
    The whitest virtue strikes. What king so strong
      Can tie the gall up in the slanderous tongue?
      - William Shakespeare, Measure for Measure
         (Vincentio, the Duke at III, ii)

O, what may man within him hide,
  Though angel on the outward side!
      - William Shakespeare, Measure for Measure
         (Vincentio, the Duke at III, ii)

What king so strong,
  Can tie the gall up in a slanderer's tongue?
      - William Shakespeare, Measure for Measure
         (Vincentio, the Duke at III, ii)

They say, best men are moulded out of faults.
      - William Shakespeare, Measure for Measure
         (Mariana at V, i)

Let every eye negotiate for itself
  And trust no agent.
      - William Shakespeare,
        Much Ado About Nothing
         (Claudio at II, i)

Some Cupid kills with arrows, some with traps.
      - William Shakespeare,
        Much Ado About Nothing (Hero at III, i)

Every man can master a grief but he that has it.
      - William Shakespeare,
        Much Ado About Nothing
         (Benedick at III, ii)

If half thy outward graces had been placed
  About the thoughts and counsels of thy heart.
      - William Shakespeare,
        Much Ado About Nothing
         (Claudio at IV, i)

It so falls out
  That what we have we prize not to the worth
    Whiles we enjoy it; but being lacked and lost,
      Why, then we rack the value.
      - William Shakespeare,
        Much Ado About Nothing
         (Friar Francis at IV, i)

I follow him, to serve my turn upon him.
      - William Shakespeare,
        Othello the Moor of Venice
         (Iago at I, i)

Preferment goes by letter and affection,
  And not by old gradation, where each second
    Stood heir to th's first.
      - William Shakespeare,
        Othello the Moor of Venice
         (Iago at I, i)

Preferment goes by letter and affection.
      - William Shakespeare,
        Othello the Moor of Venice
         (Iago at I, i)

'Tis not long after
  But I will wear my heart upon my sleeve,
    For daws to peck at.
      - William Shakespeare,
        Othello the Moor of Venice
         (Iago at I, i)

She has deceived her father, and may thee.
      - William Shakespeare,
        Othello the Moor of Venice
         (Brabantio at I, iii)

She loved me for the dangers I had passed,
  And I loved her for having pitied them.
      - William Shakespeare,
        Othello the Moor of Venice
         (Othello at I, iii)

But men are men; the best sometimes forget.
      - William Shakespeare,
        Othello the Moor of Venice
         (Iago at II, iii)

Come, come, good wine is a good familiar creature if it be well used. Exclaim no more against it.
      - William Shakespeare,
        Othello the Moor of Venice
         (Iago at II, iii)

Dull not device by coldness and delay.
      - William Shakespeare,
        Othello the Moor of Venice
         (Iago at II, iii)

Every inordinate cup is unblessed, and the ingredient is a devil.
      - William Shakespeare,
        Othello the Moor of Venice
         (Cassio at II, iii)

How poor are they that have not patience!
  What wound did ever heal but by degrees?
      - William Shakespeare,
        Othello the Moor of Venice
         (Iago at II, iii)

O I have lost my reputation! I have lost the immortal part, sir, of myself, and what remains is bestial.
      - William Shakespeare,
        Othello the Moor of Venice
         (Cassio at II, iii)

Pleasure and action make the hours seem short.
      - William Shakespeare,
        Othello the Moor of Venice
         (Iago at II, iii)

Reputation is an idle and most false imposition; oft got without merit and lost without deserving.
      - William Shakespeare,
        Othello the Moor of Venice
         (Iago at II, iii)

When devils will the blackest sins put on,
  They do suggest at first with heavenly shows!
      - William Shakespeare,
        Othello the Moor of Venice
         (Iago at II, iii)


Displaying page 403 of 414 for this topic:   << Prev  Next >>  1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 128 129 130 131 132 133 134 135 136 137 138 139 140 141 142 143 144 145 146 147 148 149 150 151 152 153 154 155 156 157 158 159 160 161 162 163 164 165 166 167 168 169 170 171 172 173 174 175 176 177 178 179 180 181 182 183 184 185 186 187 188 189 190 191 192 193 194 195 196 197 198 199 200 201 202 203 204 205 206 207 208 209 210 211 212 213 214 215 216 217 218 219 220 221 222 223 224 225 226 227 228 229 230 231 232 233 234 235 236 237 238 239 240 241 242 243 244 245 246 247 248 249 250 251 252 253 254 255 256 257 258 259 260 261 262 263 264 265 266 267 268 269 270 271 272 273 274 275 276 277 278 279 280 281 282 283 284 285 286 287 288 289 290 291 292 293 294 295 296 297 298 299 300 301 302 303 304 305 306 307 308 309 310 311 312 313 314 315 316 317 318 319 320 321 322 323 324 325 326 327 328 329 330 331 332 333 334 335 336 337 338 339 340 341 342 343 344 345 346 347 348 349 350 351 352 353 354 355 356 357 358 359 360 361 362 363 364 365 366 367 368 369 370 371 372 373 374 375 376 377 378 379 380 381 382 383 384 385 386 387 388 389 390 391 392 393 394 395 396 397 398 399 400 401 402 [403] 404 405 406 407 408 409 410 411 412 413 414

 WWW.GIGA-USA.COM     Back to Top of Page 
The GIGA name and the GIGA logo are trademarks registered in the United States Patent and Trademark Office.
GIGA-USA and GIGA-USA.COM are servicemarks of the domain owner.
Copyright © 1999-2013 John C. Shepard. All Rights Reserved.
Last Revised: 2013 March 16
Click > HERE < to report errors

Buy a good book from
Varying Hare Books