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RALPH WALDO EMERSON
American essayist and poet
(1803 - 1882)
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I have heard that death takes us away from ill things, not from good. I have heard that when we pronounce the name of man we pronounce the belief of immortality.
      - [Death]

I have heard that whoever loves is in no condition old.
      - [Love]

I have heard with admiring submission the experience of the lady who declared that the sense of being perfectly well-dressed gives a feeling of inward tranquility which religion is powerless to bestow.
      - [Apparel]

I like man, but not men.
      - [Man]

I like the silent church before the service begins, better than any preaching.
      - [Churches]

I look on that man as happy, who, when there is question of success, looks into his work for a reply, not into the market, not into opinion, not into patronage.
      - [Work]

I see my trees repair their boughs.
      - [Trees]

I see the spectacle of morning from the hilltop over against my house, from daybreak to sunrise, with emotions which an angel might share. The long slender bars of cloud float like fishes in the sea of crimson light. From the earth, as a shore, I look out into that silent sea. I seem to partake its rapid transformations; the active enchantment reaches my dust, and I dilate and conspire with the morning wind.
      - [Morning]

I should as soon think of swimming across the Charles River when I wish to go to Boston, as of reading all my books in originals, when I have them rendered for me in my mother tongue.
      - [Reading]

I think sculpture and painting have an effect to teach us manners, and abolish hurry.
      - [Art]

I think sometimes could I only have music on my own terms; could I live in a great city, and know where I could go whenever I wished the ablution and inundation of musical waves, that were a bath and a medicine.
      - [Music]

Ideas must work through the brains and arms of good and brave men, or they are no better than dreams.
      - [Ideas]

If eyes were made for seeing, then beauty is its own excuse for being.
      - [Beauty]

If the gatherer gathers too-much, Nature takes out of the man what she puts into his chest; swells the estate, but kills the owner. Nature hates, monopolies and exceptions.
      - [Compensation]

If the stars should appear one night in a thousand years, how men would believe and adore; and preserve for many generations the remembrance of the City of God which has been shown!
      - [Stars]

If we will take the good we find, asking no questions, we shall have heaping measures. The great gifts are not got by analysis. Everything good is on the highway. The middle region of our being is the temperate zone.
      - [Contentment]

If you believe in fate to your harm; believe it, at least, for your good.
      - [Fate]

If you would learn to write, it is in the street you must learn it. Both for the vehicle and for the aims of fine arts, you must frequent the public square. The people, and not the college, is the writer's home. A scholar is a candle which the love and desire of all men will light.
      - [Writing]

If you would lift me you must be on a higher ground.
      - [Clergymen]

Immortality will come to such as are fit for it; and he who would be a great soul in the future must be a great soul now.
      - [Immortality]

In art the hand can never execute anything higher than the heart can inspire.
      - [Art]

In dreams we are true poets; we create the persons of the drama; we give them appropriate figures faces, costumes; they are perfect in their organs, attitudes, manners; moreover they speak after their own characters, not ours; and we listen with surprise to what they say.
      - [Dreams]

In eloquence, the great triumphs of the art are when the orator is lifted above himself; when consciously he makes himself the mere tongue of the occasion and the hour, and says what cannot but be said. Hence the term "abandonment" to describe the self-surrender of the orator. Not his will, but the principle on which he is horsed, the great connection and crisis of events, thunder in the ear of the crowd.
      - [Eloquence]

In fact, it is as difficult to appropriate the thoughts of others as it is to invent.
      - [Thought]

In nature nothing can be given, all things are sold.
      - [Nature]


Displaying page 10 of 39 for this author:   << Prev  Next >>  1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 [10] 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39

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