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RALPH WALDO EMERSON
American essayist and poet
(1803 - 1882)
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Science * * * necessitates a faith commensurate with the grander orbits and universal laws which it discloses. Yet it does not surprise the moral sentiment. That was older, and awaited expectant these larger insights.
      - [Science]

Science corrects the old creeds, sweeps away, with every new perception, our infantile catechisms, and necessitates a faith commensurate with the grander orbits and universal laws which it discloses.
      - [Science]

Science does not know its debt to imagination.
      - [Science]

Science surpasses the old miracles of mythology.
      - [Science]

Self-command is the main elegance.
      - [Politeness]

Self-love is, in almost all men, such an over-weight that they are incredulous of a man's habitual preference of the general good to his own; but when they see it proved by sacrifices of ease, wealth, rank, and of life itself, there is no limit to their admiration.
      - [Self-love]

Shallow men believe in luck, believe in circumstances: It was somebody's name, or he happened to be there at the time, or it was so then, and another day it would have been otherwise. Strong men believe in cause and effect. The man was born to do it, and his father was born to be the father of him and of this deed, and, by looking narrowly, you shall see there was no luck in the matter, but it was all a problem in arithmetic, or an experiment in chemistry.
      - [Luck]

Skepticism is slow suicide.
      - [Skepticism]

Skill to do comes of doing.
      - [Skill]

Slavery is no scholar, no improver; it does not love the whistle of the railroad; it does not love the newspaper, the mailbag, a college, a book or a preacher who has the absurd whim of saying what he thinks; it does not increase the white population; it does not improve the soil; everything goes to decay.
      - [Slavery]

Slavery it is that makes slavery; freedom, freedom. The slavery of women happened when the men were slaves of kings.
      - [Slavery]

Sleep lingers all our lifetime about our eyes, as night hovers all day in the boughs of the fir-tree.
      - [Sleep]

So of cheerfulness, or a good temper, the more it is spent, the more of it remains.
      - [Cheerfulness]

Society acquires new arts, and loses old instincts.
      - [Society]

Society does not love its unmaskers.
      - [Society]

Society everywhere is in conspiracy against the manhood of every one of its members. Society is a joint-stock company, in which the members agree, for the better securing of his bread to each shareholder, to surrender the liberty and culture of the eater.
      - [Society]

Society is a masked ball, where every one hides his real character, and reveals it by hiding.
      - [Society]

Society is a troop of thinkers and the best heads among them take the best places.
      - [Society]

Society is infected with rude, cynical, restless, and frivolous persons who prey upon the rest, and whom no public opinion concentrated into good manners, forms accepted by the sense of all, can reach; the contradictors and railers at public and private tables, who are like terriers, who conceive it the duty of a dog of honor to growl at any passer-by, and do the honors of the house by barking him out of sight.
      - [Rudeness]

Society will pardon much to genius and special gifts; but, being in its nature conventional, it loves what is conventional, or what belongs to coming together.
      - [Society]

Solitude, the safeguard of mediocrity, is to genius the stern friend, the cold, obscure shelter where moult the wings which will bear it farther than suns and stars. He who would inspire and lead his race must be defended from traveling with the souls of other men, from living, breathing, reading, and writing in the daily timeworn yoke of their opinions.
      - [Solitude]

Some books leave us free and some books make us free.
      - [Books]

Some eyes threaten like a loaded and levelled pistol, and others are as insulting as hissing or kicking; some have no more expression than blueberries, while others are as deep as a well which you can fall into.
      - [Eyes]

Some men at the approach of a dispute neigh like horses. Unless there be an argument, they think nothing is doing. Some talkers excel in the precision with which they formulate their thoughts, so that you get from them somewhat to remember; others lay criticism asleep by a charm. Especially women use words that are not words,--as steps in a dance are not steps,--but reproduce the genius of that they speak of; as the sound of some bells makes us think of the bell merely, whilst the church chimes in the distance bring the church and its serious memories before us.
      - [Argument]

Sometimes a scream is better than a thesis.
      - [Theories]


Displaying page 18 of 39 for this author:   << Prev  Next >>  1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 [18] 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39

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