GIGA THE MOST EXTENSIVE
COLLECTION OF
QUOTATIONS
ON THE INTERNET
Google
Search GIGA
Loading
Home
Page
GIGA
Quotes
Biographical
Name Index
Biographical
Name List
Chronological
Name Index
Topic
List
Reading
List
Site
Notes
Varying Hare
Books
Crossword
Solver
Anagram
Solver
SubAnagram
Solver
TOPICS:          A   B   C   D   E   F   G   H   I   J   K   L   M   N   O   P   Q   R   S   T   U   V   W   X   Y   Z
PEOPLE:    #   A   B   C   D   E   F   G   H   I   J   K   L   M   N   O   P   Q   R   S   T   U   V   W   X   Y   Z


DEATH
 << Prev Page    Displaying page 28 of 36    Next Page >> 
[ Also see Abortion Bereavement Birth Calmness Death of Babies Death of Children Death of Christ Decay End Epitaphs Eternity Execution Farewell Funerals Futurity Graves Grief Guillotine Heaven Hell Immortality Killing Life Monuments Mortality Mourning Murder Oblivion Parting Poison Punishment Rest Resurrection Resurrection of Christ Retribution Scaffold Sleep Suicide Tears Undertakers Wills ]

Who would fardels bear,
  To grunt and sweat under a weary life,
    But that the dread of something after death,
      The undiscovered country, from whose bourn
        No traveller returns, puzzles the will,
          And makes us rather bear those ills we have
            Than fly to others that we know not of?
      - William Shakespeare,
        Hamlet Prince of Denmark
         (Hamlet at III, i)

Lay her i' th' earth,
  And from her fair and unpolluted flesh
    May violets spring!
      - William Shakespeare,
        Hamlet Prince of Denmark
         (Laertes at V, i)

We should profane the service of the dead
  To sing a requiem and such rest to her
    As to peace-parted souls.
      - William Shakespeare,
        Hamlet Prince of Denmark
         (Doctor at V, i)

O proud Death,
  What feast is toward in thine eternal cell
    That thou so many princes at a shot
      So bloodily hast struck?
      - William Shakespeare,
        Hamlet Prince of Denmark
         (Fortinbras at V, ii)

Cowards die many times before their deaths;
  The valiant never taste of death but once.
    Of all the wonders that I yet have heard.
      It seems to me most strange that men should fear,
        Seeing that death, a necessary end,
          Will come when it will come.
      - William Shakespeare, Julius Caesar
         (Caesar at II, ii)

Cowards die many times before their deaths;
  The valiant never taste of death but once.
      - William Shakespeare, Julius Caesar
         (Caesar at II, ii)

When beggars die there are no comets seen;
  The heavens themselves blaze forth the death of princes.
      - William Shakespeare, Julius Caesar
         (Calphurnia at II, ii)

That we shall die, we know; 'tis but the time,
  And drawing days out, that men stand upon.
      - William Shakespeare, Julius Caesar
         (Brutus at III, i)

Why, he that cuts off twenty years of life
  Cuts off so many years of fearing death.
      - William Shakespeare, Julius Caesar
         (Casca at III, i)

We must die, Messala.
  With meditating that she must die once,
    I have the patience to endure it now.
      - William Shakespeare, Julius Caesar
         (Brutus at IV, iii)

Come, let us take a muster speedily.
  Doomsday is near. Die all, die merrily.
      - William Shakespeare,
        King Henry the Fourth, Part I
         (Hotspur at IV, i)

Look how we can, or sad or merrily,
  Interpretation will misquote our looks,
    And we shall feed like oxen at a stall,
      The better cherished still the nearer death.
      - William Shakespeare,
        King Henry the Fourth, Part I
         (Worcester at V, ii)

A man can die but once. We owe God a death.
      - William Shakespeare,
        King Henry the Fourth, Part II
         (Feeble at III, ii)

What, is the old king dead?
  As nail in door. The things I speak are just.
      - William Shakespeare,
        King Henry the Fourth, Part II
         (Falstaff & Pistol at V, iii)

Ah, what a sign it is of evil life
  Where death's approach is seen so terrible.
      - William Shakespeare,
        King Henry the Sixth, Part II
         (King Henry at III, iii)

He dies and makes no sign. O God, forgive him.
      - William Shakespeare,
        King Henry the Sixth, Part II
         (King Henry at III, iii)

The sands are numb'red that makes up my life.
  Here must I stay and here my life must end.
      - William Shakespeare,
        King Henry the Sixth, Part III
         (Plantagenet, Duke of York at I, iv)

Ah, who is nigh? Come to me, friend or foe,
  And tell me who is victor, York or Warwick.
    Why ask I that? My mangled body shows,
      My blood, my want of strength, my sick heart shows,
        That I must yield my body to the earth.
          And, by my fall, the conquest to my foe.
            Thus yields the cedar to the axe's edge,
              Whose arms gave shelter to the princely eagle,
                Under whose shade the ramping lion slept,
                  Whose top-branch overpeered Jove's spreading tee
                    And kept low shrubs from winter's powerful wind.
      - William Shakespeare,
        King Henry the Sixth, Part III
         (Warwick at V, ii)

Why, what is pomp, rule, reign, but earth and dust
  And, live we how we can, yet die we must.
      - William Shakespeare,
        King Henry the Sixth, Part III
         (Warwick at V, ii)

O our lives' sweetness,
  That we the pain of death would hourly die
    Rather than die at once!
      - William Shakespeare, King Lear
         (Edgar at V, iii)

So wise so young, they say, do never live long.
      - William Shakespeare, King Richard III
         (III, iii)

Nothing in his life
  Became him like the leaving it.
      - William Shakespeare, Macbeth
         (Malcolm at I, iv)

Duncan is in his grave;
  After life's fitful fever he sleeps well.
    Treason has done his worst: nor steel nor poison,
      Malice domestic, foreign levy, nothing,
        Can touch him further.
      - William Shakespeare, Macbeth
         (Macbeth at III, ii)

Ay, but to die, and go we know not where,
  To lie in cold obstruction and to rot,
    This sensible warm motion to become
      A kneaded clod; and the delighted spirit
        To bathe in fiery floods, or to reside
          In thrilling region of thick-ribbed ice,
            To be imprisoned in the viewless winds
              And blown with restless violence round about
                The pendent world; or to be worse that worst
                  Of those that lawless and incertain thought
                    Imagine howling, 'tis too horrible.
                      The weariest and most loathed worldly life
                        That age, ache, penury, and imprisonment
                          Can lay on nature is a paradise
                            To what we fear of death.
      - William Shakespeare, Measure for Measure
         (Claudio at III, i)

Be absolute for death: either death or life
  Shall thereby be the sweeter.
      - William Shakespeare, Measure for Measure
         (Vincentio, the Duke at III, i)


Displaying page 28 of 36 for this topic:   << Prev  Next >>  1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 [28] 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36

 WWW.GIGA-USA.COM     Back to Top of Page 
The GIGA name and the GIGA logo are trademarks registered in the United States Patent and Trademark Office.
GIGA-USA and GIGA-USA.COM are servicemarks of the domain owner.
Copyright © 1999-2013 John C. Shepard. All Rights Reserved.
Last Revised: 2013 March 16
Click > HERE < to report errors

Buy a good book from
Varying Hare Books