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LORD BYRON (GEORGE GORDON NOEL BYRON)
English poet
(1788 - 1824)
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"Not to admire, is all the art I know
  (Plain truth, dear Murray, needs few flowers of speech)
    To make men happy, or to keep them so."
      (So take it in the very words of Creech)
        Thus Horace wrote we all know long ago;
          And thus Pope quotes the precept to re-teach
            From his translation; but had none admired,
              Would Pope have sung, or Horace been inspired?
      - Don Juan (canto V, 100) [Admiration]

For through the South the custom still commands
  The gentleman to kiss the lady's hands.
      - Don Juan (canto V, st. 105) [Hand]

Yet even her tyranny had such a grace,
  The women pardoned all, except her face.
      - Don Juan (canto V, st. 113) [Face]

She was a good deal shock'd; not shock'd at tears,
  For women shed and use them at their liking;
    But there is something when man's eye appears
      Wet, still more disagreeable and striking.
      - Don Juan (canto V, st. 118) [Tears]

Men are the sport of circumstances, when
  The circumstances seem the sport of men.
      - Don Juan (canto V, st. 17) [Circumstance]

And one by one in turn, some grand mistake
  Casts off its bright skin yearly like the snake.
      - Don Juan (canto V, st. 21) [Change]

'Tis pleasant purchasing our fellow-creatures;
  And all are to be sold, if you consider
    Their passions, and are dext'rous; some by features
      Are brought up, others by a warlike leader;
        Some by a place--as tend their years or natures;
          The most by ready cash--but all have prices,
            From crowns to kicks, according to their vices.
      - Don Juan (canto V, st. 27) [Bribery]

I have a passion for the name of "Mary,"
  For once it was a magic sound to me,
    And still it half calls up the realms of fairy,
      Where I beheld what never was to be.
      - Don Juan (canto V, st. 4) [Names]

Put himself upon his good behavior.
      - Don Juan (canto V, st. 47)
        [Proverbial Phrases]

That all-softening, overpowering knell,
  The tocsin of the soul--the dinner bell.
      - Don Juan (canto V, st. 49) [Bells]

There's not a sea the passenger e'er pukes in,
  Turns up more dangerous breakers than the Euxine.
      - Don Juan (canto V, st. 5) [Ocean]

And gazed around them to the left and right
  With the prophetic eye of appetite.
      - Don Juan (canto V, st. 50) [Appetite]

Yet smelt roast meat, beheld a huge fire shine,
  And cooks in motion with their clean arms bared.
      - Don Juan (canto V, st. 50) [Cookery]

But every fool describes, in these bright days,
  His wondrous journey to some foreign court,
    And spawns his quarto, and demands your praise,--
      Death to his publisher, to him 'tis sport.
      - Don Juan (canto V, st. 52) [Authorship]

And nearer as they came, a genial savour
  Of certain stews, and roast-meats, and pilaus.
    Things which in hungry mortals' eyes find favour.
      - Don Juan (canto V, st. 57) [Cookery]

Sofas 'twas half a sin to sit upon,
  So costly were they; carpets, every stitch
    Of workmanship so rare, they make you wish
      You could glide o'er them like a golden fish.
      - Don Juan (canto V, st. 65) [Luxury]

Her years
  Were ripe, they might make six-and-twenty springs;
    But there are forms which Time to touch forbears.
      And turns aside his scythe to vulgar things.
      - Don Juan (canto V, st. 98) [Youth]

There is a tide in the affairs of women
  Which, taken at the flood, leads--God knows where.
      - Don Juan (canto VI, st. 2) [Wooing]

I love the sex, and sometimes would reverse
  The tyrant's wish, "that mankind only had
    One neck, which he with one fell stroke might pierce;"
      My wish is quite as wide, but not so bad,
        And much more tender on the whole than fierce;
          It being (not now, but only while a lad)
            That womankind had but one rosy mouth,
              To kiss them all at once, from North to South.
      - Don Juan (canto VI, st. 27) [Women]

But she was a soft landscape of mild earth,
  Where all was harmony, and calm, and quiet,
    Luxuriant, budding; cheerful without mirth.
      - Don Juan (canto VI, st. 53) [Women]

I've seen your stormy seas and stormy women,
  And pity lovers rather more than seamen.
      - Don Juan (canto VI, st. 53) [Women]

But these are foolish things to all the wise,
  And I love wisdom more than she loves me;
    My tendency is to philosophise
      On most things, from a tyrant to a tree;
        But still the spouseless virgin Knowledge flies,
          What are we? and whence come we? what shall be
            Our ultimate existence? What's our present?
              Are questions answerless, and yet incessant.
      - Don Juan (canto VI, st. 63) [Wisdom]

Heroic, stoic Cato, the sententious,
  Who lent his lady to his friend Hortensius.
      - Don Juan (canto VI, st. 7) [Character]

Ecclesiastes said that "all is vanity,"
  Most modern preachers say the same, or show it
    By their examples of true Christianity:
      In short, all know, or very short may know it.
      - Don Juan (canto VII, st. 6) [Vanity]

For everything seemed resting on his nod,
  As they could read in all eyes. Now to them,
    Who were accustomed, as a sort of god,
      To see the sultan, rich in many a gem,
        Like an imperial peacock stalk abroad
          (That royal bird, whose tail's a diadem,)
            With all the pomp of power, it was a doubt
              How power could condescend to do without.
      - Don Juan (canto VII, st. 74) [Peacocks]


Displaying page 26 of 34 for this author:   << Prev  Next >>  1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 [26] 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34

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