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LOVE
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[ Also see Adore Affection Amity Babyhood Benefit Charity Childhood Compassion Consideration Constancy Courtship Desire Devotion Esteem Fancy Friends Friendship Gentleness Hatred Heart Husbands Infatuation Jealousy Kisses Love of Country Lovers Loyalty Lust Marriage Matrimony Mercy Motherhood Passion Patriotism Romance Seduction Sex Sighs Spring Tenderness Wives Women Wooing Youth ]

Upon this hint I spake.
  She loved me for the dangers I had passed,
    And I loved her that she did pity them.
      This only is the witchcraft I have used.
        Here comes the lady. Let her witness it.
      - William Shakespeare,
        Othello the Moor of Venice
         (Othello at I, iii)

Perdition catch my soul
  But I do love thee! and when I love thee not,
    Chaos is come again.
      - William Shakespeare,
        Othello the Moor of Venice
         (Othello at III, iii)

What, keep a week away? seven days and nights?
  Eightscore eight hours? and lovers' absent hours,
    More tedious than the dial eightscore times?
      O weary reck'ning!
      - William Shakespeare,
        Othello the Moor of Venice
         (Bianca at III, iv)

Ay, with Cassio. Nay, had she been true,
  If heaven would make me such another world
    Of one entire and perfect chrysolite,
      I'ld not have sold her for it.
      - William Shakespeare,
        Othello the Moor of Venice
         (Othello at V, ii)

I pray you, in your letters,
  When you shall these unlucky deeds relate,
    Speak of me as I am. Nothing extenuate,
      Nor set down aught in malice. Then must you speak
        Of one that loved not wisely, but too well;
          Of one not easily jealous, but, being wrought,
            Perplexed in the extreme; of one whose hand,
              Like the base Judean, threw a pearl away
                Richer than all his tribe; of one whose subdued eyes,
                  Albeit unused to the melting mood,
                    Drop tears as fast as the Arabian trees
                      Their med'cinable gum.
      - William Shakespeare,
        Othello the Moor of Venice
         (Othello at V, ii)

Love is a smoke raised with the fume of sighs;
  Being purged, a fire sparkling in lovers' eyes;
    Being vexed, a sea nourished with lovers' tears.
      What is it else? A madness most discreet,
        A choking gall, and a preserving sweet.
      - William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet
         (Romeo at I, i)

She'll not be hit
  With Cupid's arrow. She hath Dian's wit,
    And, in strong proof of chastity well armed,
      From Love's weak childish bow she lives unharmed.
        She will not stay the siege of loving terms,
          Nor bide th' encounter of assailing eyes,
            Nor ope her lap to saint-seducing gold.
      - William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet
         (Romeo at I, i)

Appear thou in the likeness of sigh;
  Speak but one rhyme, and I am satisfied!
    Cry but 'Ay me! pronounce but 'love' and 'dove':
      Speak to my gossip Venus one fair word,
        One nickname for her purblind son and heir
          Young Abraham Cupid, he that shot so true
            When King Cophetus loved the beggar maid!
      - William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet
         (Mercutio at II, i)

At lovers' perjuries,
  They say Jove laughs.
      - William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet
         (Juliet at II, ii)

It is my soul that calls upon my name.
  How silver-sweet sound lovers' tongues by night,
    Like softest music to attending ears!
      - William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet
         (Romeo at II, ii)

Love goes toward love as schoolboys from their books;
  But love from love, toward school with heavy looks.
      - William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet
         (Romeo at II, ii)

My bounty is as boundless as the sea,
  My love as deep; the more I give to thee,
    The more I have, for both are infinite.
      - William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet
         (Juliet at II, ii)

O Romeo, Romeo! wherefore art thou Romeo?
  Deny thy father and refuse thy name;
    Or, if thou wilt not, be but sworn my love,
      And I'll no longer be a Capulet.
      - William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet
         (Juliet at II, ii)

See how she leans her cheek upon her hand!
  O that I were a glove upon that hand,
    That I might touch that cheek!
      - William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet
         (Romeo at II, ii)

With love's light wings did I o'erperch these walls;
  For stony limits cannot hold love out,
    And what love can do, that dares love attempt.
      - William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet
         (Romeo at II, ii)

'Tis almost morning. I would have thee gone--
  And yet no farther that a wanton's bird,
    That lets it hop a little from her hand,
      Like a poor prisoner in his twisted gyves,
        And with a silken thread plucks it back again,
          So loving-jealous of his liberty.
      - William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet
         (Juliet at II, iii)

Love's heralds should be thoughts,
  Which ten times faster glide than the sun's beams
    Driving back shadows over low'ring hills.
      Therefore do nimble-pinioned doves draw Love,
        And therefore hath the wind-swift Cupid wings.
      - William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet
         (Juliet at II, v)

Now Romeo is beloved and loves again,
  Alike bewitched by the charm of looks;
    But to his foe supposed he must complain,
      And she steal love's sweet bait from fearful hooks.
      - William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet
         (Chorus at II, v, chorus)

Therefore love moderately: long love doth so;
  Too swift arrives as tardy as too slow.
      - William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet
         (Friar Laurence at II, vi)

Come, gentle night; come, loving, black-browed night;
  Give me my Romeo; and, when he shall die,
    Take him and cut him out in little stars,
      And he will make the face of heaven so fine
        That all the world will be in love with night
          And pay no worship to the garish sun.
      - William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet
         (Juliet at III, ii)

Love's not Time's fool, though rosy lips and cheeks
  With his bending sickle's compass come;
    Love alters not with his brief hours and weeks,
      But bears it out even to the edge of doom.
      - William Shakespeare, Sonnet CXVI

But you are wise,
  Or else you love not, for to be wise and love
    Exceeds man's might; that dwells with gods above.
      - William Shakespeare,
        The History of Troilus and Cressida
         (Cressida at III, ii)

They say all lovers swear more performance than they are able, and yet reserve an ability that they never perform, vowing more than the perfection of ten and discharging less than the tenth part of one.
      - William Shakespeare,
        The History of Troilus and Cressida
         (Cressida at III, ii)

This is the most despiteful gentle greeting,
  The noblest hateful love, that e'er I heard of.
      - William Shakespeare,
        The History of Troilus and Cressida
         (Paris at IV, i)

Love thyself last, cherish those hearts that hate thee;
  Corruption wins not more than honesty.
      - William Shakespeare,
        The Life of King Henry the Eighth
         (Wolsey at III, ii)


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