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SENECA (LUCIUS ANNAEUS SENECA)
Roman philosopher and moralist
(4 BC - 65 AD)
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Wine kindles wrath.
  [Lat., Vinum incendit iram.]
      - De Ira (bk. II, 19) [Wine and Spirits]

Whom they have injured they also hate.
  [Lat., Quos laeserunt et oderunt.]
      - De Ira (bk. II, ch. 33) [Hatred]

He, who has committed a fault, is to be corrected both by advice and by force, kindly and harshly, and to be made better for himself as well as for another, not without chastisement, but without passion.
  [Lat., Corrigendus est, qui peccet, et admonitione et vi, et molliter et aspere, meliorque tam sibi quam alii faciendus, non sine castigatione, sed sine ira.
      - De Ira (I, 14) [Punishment]

He must necessarily fear many, whom many fear.
  [Lat., Necesse est multo timeat, quem multi timent.]
      - De Ira (II, 11) [Fear]

Moderate pleasure relaxes the spirit, and moderates it.
  [Lat., Modica voluptas laxat animos et temperat.]
      - De Ira (II, 20) [Moderation]

Time discovers truth.
  [Lat., Veritatem dies aperit.]
      - De Ira (II, 22) [Truth]

What is more insane than to vent on senseless things the anger that is felt towards men?
  [Lat., Quid est dementius quam bilem in homines collectam in res effundere.]
      - De Ira (II, 26) [Insanity]

What narrow innocence it is for one to be good only according to the law.
  [Lat., Quam angusta innocentia est, ad legem bonum esse.]
      - De Ira (II, 27) [Innocence]

Delay is the greatest remedy for anger.
  [Lat., Maximum remedium est irae mora.]
      - De Ira (II, 28) [Delay]

Other men's sins are before our eyes; our own behind our backs.
  [Lat., Aliena vitia in oculis habemus; a tergo nostra sunt.]
      - De Ira (II, 28) [Sin]

The greater part of mankind are angry with the sinner and not with the sin.
  [Lat., Magna pars hominum est, quae non peccatis irascitur sed peccantibus.]
      - De Ira (II, 28) [Sin]

Revenge is an inhuman word.
  [Lat., Inhumanum verbum est ultio.]
      - De Ira (II, 31) [Revenge]

It is often better not to see an insult than to avenge it.
  [Lat., Saepe satius fuit dissimulare quam ulcisci.]
      - De Ira (II, 32) [Insult]

A quarrel is quickly settled when deserted by one party: there is no battle unless there be two.
  [Lat., Cadit statim simultas, ab altera parte deserta; nisi pariter, non pugnant.]
      - De Ira (II, 34) [Quarreling]

One alleviation in misfortune is to endure and submit to necessity.
  [Lat., Unum est levamentum malorum pati et necessitatibus suis obsequi.]
      - De Ira (III, 16) [Resignation]

The severest punishment a man can receive who has injured another, is to have committed the injury; and no man is more severely punished than he who is subject to the whip of his own repentance.
  [Lat., Maxima est factae injuriae paena, fecisse: nec quisquam gravius adficitur, quam qui ad supplicium poenitentiae traditur.]
      - De Ira (III, 26) [Punishment]

We are all sinful. Therefore whatever we blame in another we shall find in our own bosoms.
  [Lat., Omnes mali sumus. Quidquid itaque in alio reprehenditur, id unusquisque in suo sinu inveniet.]
      - De Ira (III, 26) [Sin]

He who has injured thee was either stronger or weaker. If weaker, spare him; if stronger, spare thyself.
  [Lat., Aut potentior te, aut imbecillior laesit: si imbecillior, barce ille; si potentior, tibi.]
      - De Ira (III, 5) [Injury]

The cock is at his best on his own dunghill.
  [Lat., Gallus in sterquilinio suo plurimum potest.]
      - De Morte Claudii [Home]

Calamity is virtue's opportunity.
  [Lat., Calamitas virtutis occasio est.]
      - De Procidentia (IV) [Misfortune]

Virtue withers away if it has no opposition.
  [Lat., Marcet sine adversario virtus.]
      - De Providentia (II) [Virtue]

He knows that the man is overcome ingloriously, who is overcome without danger.
  [Lat., Scit eum sine gloria vinci, qui sine periculo vincitur.]
      - De Providentia (III) [Danger]

There in no one more unfortunate than the man who has never been unfortunate. for it has never been in his power to try himself.
  [Lat., Nihil infelicius eo, cui nihil unquam evenit adversi, non licuit enim illi se experiri.]
      - De Providentia (III) [Misfortune]

Constant exposure to dangers will breed contempt for them.
  [Lat., Contemptum periculorum assiduitas periclitandi dabit.]
      - De Providentia (IV) [Danger]

Great men rejoice in adversity just as brave soldiers triumph in war.
  [Lat., Gaudent magni viri rebus adversis non aliter, quam fortes milites bellis.]
      - De Providentia (IV) [Adversity]


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