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SENECA (LUCIUS ANNAEUS SENECA)
Roman philosopher and moralist
(4 BC - 65 AD)
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Fortune is gentle to the lowly, and heaven strikes the humble with a light hand.
  [Lat., Minor in parvis Fortuna furit,
    Leviusque ferit leviora deus.]
      - Hippolytus (act IV, 1,124) [Fortune]

The shifting hour flies with doubtful wings; nor does swift Fortune keep faith with anyone.
  [Lat., Volat ambiguis
    Mobilis alis hora; nec ulli
      Praestat velox Fortuna fidem.]
      - Hippolytus (act IV, 1,141) [Fortune]

Fortune is less severe against those of lesser degree, and God strikes what is weak with less power.
  [Lat., Minor in parvis fortuna furit,
    Leviusque ferit leviora Deus.]
      - Hippolytus (act IV, 1124) [Punishment]

Anger, though concealed, is betrayed by the countenance.
  [Lat., Quamvis tegatur proditur vultu furor.]
      - Hippolytus (CCCLXIII) [Anger]

He who has fostered the sweet poison of love by fondling it, finds it too late to refuse the yoke which he has of his own accord assumed.
  [Lat., Qui blandiendo dulce nutrivit malum,
    Sero recusat ferre, quod subiit, jugum.]
      - Hippolytus (CXXXIV) [Love]

One crime has to be concealed by another.
  [Lat., Scelere velandum est scelus.]
      - Hippolytus (DCCXXI) [Crime]

No crime has been without a precedent.
  [Lat., Nullum caruit exemplo nefas.]
      - Hippolytus (DLIV) [Crime]

He who begs timidly courts a refusal.
  [Lat., Qui timide rogat,
    Docet negare.]
      - Hippolytus (II, 593) [Beggary]

Behold a worthy sight, to which the God, turning his attention to his own work, may direct his gaze. Behold an equal thing, worthy of a God, a brave man matched in conflict with evil fortune.
  [Lat., Ecce spectaculum dignum, ad quod respiciat intentus operi suo Deus. Ecce par Deo dignum, vir fortis cum mala fortuna compositus.]
      - Lib. de Divina Providentia [Adversity]

Nor shall Thule be the extremity of the world.
  [Lat., Nec sit terris ultima Thule.]
      - Med (act III, 375) [Country Life]

No time is too short for the wicked to injure their neighbors.
  [Lat., Nullum ad nocendum tempus angustum est malis.]
      - Medea (292) [Time]

Fortune can take away riches, but not courage.
  [Lat., Fortune opes auferre, non animum potest.]
      - Medea (CLXXVI) [Courage]

If you judge, investigate; if you reign, command.
  [Lat., Si judicas, cognosce; si regnas, jube.]
      - Medea (CXCIV) [Judges : Law]

He who decides a case without hearing the other side, though he decide justly, cannot be considered just.
  [Lat., Qui statuit aliquid, parte inaudita altera,
    Aequum licet statuerit, haud aequus fuerit.]
      - Medea (CXCIX) [Justice : Law]

He profits by crime is guilty of it.
  [Lat., Cui podest scelus,
    Is fecit.]
      - Medea (D) [Crime]

That grief is light which can take counsel.
  [Lat., Levis est dolor qui capere consilium potest.]
      - Medea (I, 55) [Grief]

The whole discord of this world consists in discords.
  [Lat., Tota hujus mundi concordia ex discordibus constat.]
      - Nat. Quoest (bk. VII, 27) [Contention]

The voice is nothing but beaten air.
  [Lat., Vox nihil aliud quam ictus aer.]
      - Naturalinum Quoestionum (bk. II) [Voice]

To preserve the life of citizens, is the greatest virtue in the father of his country.
  [Lat., Servare cives, major est virtus patriae patri.]
      - Octavia (444) [Patriotism]

He deserves praise who does not what he may, but what he ought.
  [Lat., Id facere laus est quod decet, non quod licet.]
      - Octavia (454) [Praise]

This is our chief bane, that we live not according to the light of reason, but after the fashion of others.
  [Lat., Id nobis maxime nocet, quod non ad rationis lumen sed ad similitudinem aliorum vivimus.]
      - Octavia (act II, 454) [Reason]

It is the act of the indolent not to know what he may lawfully do. It is praiseworthy to do what is becoming, and not merely what is lawful.
  [Lat., Inertis est nescire, quid liceat sibi.
    Id facere, laus est, quod decet; non, quod licet.]
      - Octavia (CCCCLIII) [Law]

No one becomes guilty by fate.
  [Lat., Nemo fit fato nocens.]
      - Oedipus (1,019) [Fate]

Leave in concealment what has long been concealed.
  [Lat., Latere semper patere, quod latuit diu.]
      - Oedipus (826) [Secrecy]

Truth hates delays.
  [Lat., Veritas odit moras.]
      - Oedipus (850) [Truth]


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