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SENECA (LUCIUS ANNAEUS SENECA)
Roman philosopher and moralist
(4 BC - 65 AD)
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Fire tries gold, misery tries brave men.
  [Lat., Ignis aurum probat, misera fortes viros.]
      - De Providentia (V) [Misery]

Nothing is more dishonourable than an old man, heavy with years, who has no other evidence of his having lived long except his age.
  [Lat., Nihil turpius est, quam grandis natu senex, qui nullum aliud habet argumentum, quo se probet diu vixisse, praeter aetatum.]
      - De Tranquillitate Animi (III, 8) [Age]

It is an extreme evil to depart from the company of the living before you die.
  [Lat., Ultimum malorum est ex vivorum numero exire antequam moriaris.]
      - De Tranquillitate Animi (V, v) [Death]

There is nothing so disagreeable, that a patient mind can not find some solace for it.
  [Lat., Nihil tam acerbum est in quo non aequus animus solatium inveniat.]
      - De Tranquillitate Animi (X, 4) [Patience]

There has never been any great genius without a spice of madness.
  [Lat., Nullum magnum ingenium sine mixtura dementiae fuit.]
      - De Tranquillitate Animi (XVII, 10)
        [Insanity]

May the earth rest lightly on thee.
  [Lat., Sit tua terra levis.]
      - Epigram (II, Ad Corsican) [Epitaphs]

And when Solitude leads us into all manner of evil.
  [Lat., Atque ubi omnia nobis mala solitudo persuadet.]
      - Epistle (25),
        quoting Galgacus, leader of the Britains
        [Solitude]

Every change of place becomes a delight.
  [Lat., Omnis mutatio loci jucunda fiet.]
      - Epistles (28) [Variety]

I am not born for one corner; the whole world is my native land.
  [Lat., Non sum uni angulo natus; patria nea totus hic est mundus.]
      - Epistles (28) [World]

It is bad to live for necessity; but there is no necessity to live in necessity.
  [Lat., Malum est necessitati vivere; sed in necessitate vivere necessitas nulla est.]
      - Epistles (58) [Necessity]

All things are to be hoped by a man as long as he is alive. ("A very effeminate saying.")
  [Lat., Omnia homini, dum vivit, speranda sunt.]
      - Epistles (70) [Hope]

A dwarf is small even if he stands on a mountain; a colossus keeps his height, even if he stands in a well.
  [Lat., Parvus pumilio, licet in monte constiterit; colossus magnitudinem suam servabit, etiam si steterit in puteo.]
      - Epistles (76) [Ability]

Oblivion is the remedy for injuries.
  [Lat., Injuriarum remedium est oblivio.]
      - Epistles (94),
        quoting from an old poet, also found in Syrus
        [Oblivion]

Those vices [luxury and neglect of decent manners] are vices of men, not of the times.
  [Lat., Hominum sunt ista [vitia], non temporum.
      - Epistles (97) [Vice]

Better to have loved and lost, than not to have loved at all.
  [Lat., Magis gauderes quod habueras, quam moereres quod amiseras.]
      - Epistles (99), (Free translation) [Love]

They will not live, and do not know how to die.
  [Lat., Vivere nolunt, et mori nesciunt.]
      - Epistles (IV) [Death]

Virtue is according to nature; vices are hostile and dangerous.
  [Lat., Virtus secundum naturam est; vitia inimica et infesta sunt.]
      - Epistles (L) [Virtue]

They are not lost but sent before.
  [Lat., Non amittuntur sed praemittuntur.]
      - Epistles (LXIII, 16) [Death]

It is folly to die of the fear of death.
  [Lat., Stultitia est timore mortis mori.]
      - Epistles (LXIX) [Death]

As is a tale, so is life: not how long it is, but how good it is, is what matters.
  [Lat., Quomodo fabula, sic vita: non quam diu, sed quam bene acta sit, refert.]
      - Epistles (LXXXVII) [Life]

Why do you ask, how long has he lived? He has lived to posterity.
  [Lat., Quid quaeris, quamdiu visit? Vixit ad posteros.]
      - Epistles (XCIII) [Posterity]

The first petition that we are to make to Almighty God is for a good conscience, the next for health of mind, and then of body.
      - Epistles (XIV) [Prayer]

[Epicurus] says that you should rather have regard to the company with whom you eat and drink, than to what you eat and drink.
  [Ante, inquit, cicumspiciendum est, cum quibos edas et bibas, quam quid edas et bibas.]
      - Epistles (XIX) [Companionship]

It [Philosophy] does not pay attention to pedigree. All, if their first origin be in question, are from the Gods.
  [Lat., Stemma non inspicit. Omnes, si ad primam originem mala in occulto patitur.]
      - Epistles (XLIV) [Ancestry]

Wisdom does not show itself so much in precept as in life--in a firmness of mind and mastery of appetite. It teaches us to do, as well as to talk; and to make our actions and words all of a color.
      - Epistles (XX) [Wisdom]


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