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LOVE
 << Prev Page    Displaying page 30 of 39    Next Page >> 
[ Also see Adore Affection Amity Babyhood Benefit Charity Childhood Compassion Consideration Constancy Courtship Desire Devotion Esteem Fancy Friends Friendship Gentleness Hatred Heart Husbands Infatuation Jealousy Kisses Love of Country Lovers Loyalty Lust Marriage Matrimony Mercy Motherhood Passion Patriotism Romance Seduction Sex Sighs Spring Tenderness Wives Women Wooing Youth ]

If thou rememb'rest not the slightest folly
  That ever love did make thee run into,
    Thou hast not loved.
      - William Shakespeare, As You Like It
         (Silvius at II, iv)

It is as easy to count atomies as to resolve the propositions of a lover; but take a taste of my finding him, and relish it with good observance.
      - William Shakespeare, As You Like It
         (Celia at III, ii)

(Rosalind:) But are you so much in love as your rhymes speak?
  (Orlando:) Neither rhyme nor reason can express how much.
      - William Shakespeare, As You Like It
         (Rosalind & Orlando at III, ii)

I pray you do not fall in love with me,
  For I am falser than vows made in wine.
      - William Shakespeare, As You Like It
         (Rosalind at III, v)

So holy and so perfect is my love,
  And I in such a poverty of grace,
    That I shall think it a most plenteous crop
      To glean the broken ears after the man
        That the main harvest reaps.
      - William Shakespeare, As You Like It
         (Silvius at III, v)

O coz, coz, coz, my pretty little coz, that thou didst know how many fathom deep I am in love! But it cannot be sounded. My affection hath an unknown bottom, like the Bay of Portugal.
      - William Shakespeare, As You Like It
         (Rosalind at IV, i)

(Phebe:) Good shepherd, tell this youth what 'tis to love.
  (Silvius:) It is to be all made of sighs and tears;
    And so am I for Phebe.
      . . . .
        If it to be all made of faith and service;
          And so am I for Phebe.
            . . . .
              It is to be all made of fantasy,
                All made of passion, and all made of wishes,
                  All adoration, duty, and observance,
                    All humbleness, all patience, and impatience,
                      All purity, all trial, all observance;
                        And so am I for Phebe.
      - William Shakespeare, As You Like It
         (Phebe & Silvius at V, ii)

There was never anything so sudden but the fight of two rams and Caesar's thrasonical brag of 'I came, saw, and overcame'; for your brother and my sister no sooner met but they looked; no sooner looked but they loved; no sooner loved but they sighed; no sooner sighed but they asked one another the reason; no sooner knew the reason but they sought the remedy: and in these degrees have they made a pair of stairs to marriage, which they will climb incontinent, or else be incontinent before marriage: they are in the very wrath of love, and they will together; clubs cannot part them.
      - William Shakespeare, As You Like It
         (Rosalind at V, ii)

I know not why
  I love this youth, and I have heard you say
    Love's reason's without reason.
      - William Shakespeare, Cymbeline
         (Arviragus at IV, ii)

This is the very ecstasy of love,
  Whose violent property fordoes itself
    And leads the will to desperate undertakings
      As oft as any passion under heaven
        That does afflict our natures.
      - William Shakespeare,
        Hamlet Prince of Denmark
         (Polonius at II, i)

'A is far gone, far gone. And truly in my youth I suffered much extremity for love, very near this.
      - William Shakespeare,
        Hamlet Prince of Denmark
         (Polonius at II, ii)

Where love is great, the littlest doubts are fear;
  Where little fears grow great, great love grows there.
      - William Shakespeare,
        Hamlet Prince of Denmark
         (Gertrude, Queen of Denmark at III, ii)

Forty thousand brothers
  Could not with all their quantity of love
    Make up my sum.
      - William Shakespeare,
        Hamlet Prince of Denmark
         (Hamlet at V, i)

Though last, not least in love, yours, good Trebonius.
      - William Shakespeare, Julius Caesar
         (Antony at III, i)

Tell me, my daughters
  (Since now we will divest us both of rule,
    Interest of territory, cares of state),
      Which of you shall we say doth love us most,
        That our largest bounty may extend
          Where nature doth with merit challenge.
      - William Shakespeare, King Lear
         (King Lear at I, i)

And when Love speaks, the voice of all the gods
  Make heaven drowsy with the harmony.
      - William Shakespeare, Love's Labor's Lost
         (Berowne at IV, iii)

By heaven, I do love, and it hath taught me to rime, and to be mallicholy; and here is part of my rime, and here by mallicholy.
      - William Shakespeare, Love's Labor's Lost
         (Berowne at IV, iii)

It adds a precious seeing to the eye:
  A lover's eyes will gaze an eagle blind.
    A lover's ear will hear the lowest sound,
      When the suspicious head of theft is stopped.
      - William Shakespeare, Love's Labor's Lost
         (Berowne at IV, iii)

Love's tongue proves dainty Bacchus gross in taste.
  For valor, is not Love a Hercules,
    Still climbing trees in the Hesperides?
      - William Shakespeare, Love's Labor's Lost
         (Berowne at IV, iii)

On a day (alack the day!)
  Love, whose month is ever May,
    Spied a blossom passing fair
      Playing in the wanton air.
        Through the velvet leaves the wind,
          All unseen, can passage find;
            That the lover, sick to death,
              Wished himself the heaven's breath.
      - William Shakespeare, Love's Labor's Lost
         (Dumaine at IV, iii)

You would for paradise break faith and troth;
  And Jove, for your live, would infringe an oath.
      - William Shakespeare, Love's Labor's Lost
         (Ferdinand, King of Navarre at IV, iii)

Friendship is constant in all other things
  Save in the office and affairs of love.
    Therefore all hearts in love use their own tongues;
      Let every eye negotiate for itself
        And trust no agent; for beauty is a witch
          Against whose charms faith melteth into blood.
      - William Shakespeare,
        Much Ado About Nothing
         (Claudio at II, i)

Let every eye negotiate for itself
  And trust no agent.
      - William Shakespeare,
        Much Ado About Nothing
         (Claudio at II, i)

Speak low if you speak love.
      - William Shakespeare,
        Much Ado About Nothing (Pedro at II, i)

If it prove so, then loving goes by haps;
  Some Cupid kills with arrows, some with traps.
      - William Shakespeare,
        Much Ado About Nothing (Hero at III, i)


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