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HORACE (QUINTUS HORATIUS FLACCUS)
Roman poet
(65 BC - 8 BC)
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Work at it night and day.
      - [Proverbs]

You are judged of by what you possess.
      - [Proverbs]

You may suppress natural propensities by force, but they will be certain to re-appear.
      - [Proverbs]

You traverse the world in search of happiness, which is within the reach of every man; a contented mind confers it on all.
      - [Happiness]

You tread on smoldering fires covered by deceitful ashes.
      - [Deceit]

You walk over red-hot lava hidden beneath treacherous ashes.
      - [Proverbs]

Your property is in danger when your neighbour's house is on fire.
      - [Proverbs]

In cold blood he leapt into burning Etna.
  [Lat., Ardentem frigidus Aetnam insiluit.]
      - Ars Poetica [Bravery]

Sorrowful words become the sorrowful; angry words suit the passionate; light words a playful expression; serious words suit the grave.
  [Lat., Tristia maestum
    Vultum verba decent; iratum, plena minarum;
      Ludentem, lasciva: severum, seria dictu.]
      - Ars Poetica (105) [Words]

What will this boaster produce worthy of this mouthing? The mountains are in labor; a ridiculous mouse will be born.
  [Lat., Quid dignum tanto feret hic promissor hiatu?
    Parturiunt montes; nascetur ridiculus mus.]
      - Ars Poetica (138) [Mountains]

Into the midst of things.
  [Lat., In medias res.]
      - Ars Poetica (148) [Action]

The miser acquires, yet fears to use his gains.
      - Ars Poetica (170) [Misers]

A eulogist of past times.
  [Lat., Laudator temporis acti.]
      - Ars Poetica (173) [Praise]

Sagacious in making useful discoveries.
  [Lat., Utiliumque sagax rerum et divina futuri.]
      - Ars Poetica (218) [Wisdom]

Of so much force are system and connection.
  [Lat., Tantum series juncturaque pollet.]
      - Ars Poetica (242) [Authorship]

I will perform the function of a whetstone, which is about to restore sharpness to iron, though itself unable to cut.
  [Lat., Fungar vice cotis, acutum
    Reddere quae ferrum valet, exsors ipsi secandi.]
      - Ars Poetica (304) [Action]

Knowledge is the foundation and source of good writing.
  [Lat., Scibendi recte sapere est et principium et fons.]
      - Ars Poetica (309) [Authorship]

Verses devoid of substance, melodious trifles.
  [Lat., Versus inopes rerum, nugaeque canorae.]
      - Ars Poetica (322) [Poetry]

Everything that is superfluous overflows from the full bosom.
  [Lat., Omne supervacuum pleno de pectore manat.]
      - Ars Poetica (337) [Gifts]

Let the fictitious sources of pleasure be as near as possible to the true.
  [Lat., Ficta voluptatis causa sint proxima veris.]
      - Ars Poetica (338) [Pleasure]

He has carried every point, who has mingled the useful with the agreeable.
  [Lat., Omne tulit punctum qui miscuit utile dulci.]
      - Ars Poetica (343) [Success]

Where there are many beauties in a poem I shall not cavil at a few faults proceeding either from negligence or from the imperfection of our nature.
  [Lat., Ubi plura nitent in carmine, non ego paucis
    Offendar maculis, quas aut incuria fudit,
      Aut humana parum cavit natura.]
      - Ars Poetica (351) [Poetry]

The musician who always plays on the same string, is laughed at.
  [Lat., Citharoedus
    Ridetur chorda qui semper oberrat eadem.]
      - Ars Poetica (355) [Music]

I, too, am indignant when the worthy Homer nods; yet in a long work it is allowable for sleep to creep over the writer.
  [Lat., Et idem
    Indignor quandoque bonus dormitat Homerus;
      Verum opere longo fas est obrepere somnum.]
      - Ars Poetica (358) [Sleep]

Neither men, nor gods, nor booksellers' shelves permit ordinary poets to exist.
  [Lat., Mediocribus esse poetis
    Non homines, non di, non concessere columnae.]
      - Ars Poetica (372) [Poets]


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