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HORACE (QUINTUS HORATIUS FLACCUS)
Roman poet
(65 BC - 8 BC)
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That man scorches with his brightness, who overpowers inferior capacities, yet he shall be revered when dead.
  [Lat., Urit enim fulgore suo qui praegravat artes
    Intra se positas; extinctus amabitur idem.]
      - Epistles (II, 1, 13) [Greatness]

The irritable tribe of poets.
  [Lat., Genus irritabile vatum.]
      - Epistles (II, 2, 102) [Poets]

What does it avail you, if of many thorns only one be removed?
  [Lat., Quid te exempta juvat spinis e pluribus una.]
      - Epistles (II, 2, 212) [Success]

The man who has lost his purse will go wherever you wish.
  [Lat., Ibit eo quo vis qui zonam perdidit.]
      - Epistles (II, 2, 40) [Poverty]

Each passing year robs us of some possession.
  [Lat., Singula de nobis anni praedantur euntes.]
      - Epistles (II, 2, 55) [Time]

All men do not, in fine, admire or love the same thing.
      - Epistles (II, 2, 58) [Opinion]

Thou canst mould him into any shape like soft clay.
  [Lat., Argilla quidvis imitaberis uda.]
      - Epistles (II, 2, 8) [Character]

God perchance will by a happy change restore these things to a settled condition.
  [Lat., Deus haec fortasse benigna
    Reducet in sedem vice.]
      - Epistles (XIII, 7) [Change]

Though you strut proud of your money, yet fortune has not changed your birth.
  [Lat., Licet superbus ambules pecuniae,
    Fortuna non mutat genus.]
      - Epodi (IV, 5) [Money]

Perhaps Providence by some happy change will restore those things to their proper places.
  [Lat., Deus haec fortasse benigna
    Reducet in sedem vice.]
      - Epodi (XIII, 7) [Providence]

Happy he who far from business, like the primitive are of mortals, cultivates with his own oxen the fields of his fathers, free from all anxieties of gain.
  [Lat., Beatus ille qui procul negotiis,
    Ut prisca gens mortalium,
      Paterna rura bobus exercet suis,
        Solutus omni faenore.]
      - Epodon (bk. II, 1) [Agriculture]

Let us seize, friends, our opportunity from the day as it passes.
  [Lat., Rapiamus, amici,
    Occasionem de die.]
      - Epodon (XIII, 3) [Opportunity]

Bolt from the blue.
      - Ode (I, 34) [Sky]

Stronger than thunder's winged force
  All-powerful gold can speed its course;
    Through watchful guards its passage make,
      And loves through solid walls to break.
        [Lat., Aurum per medios ire satellites
          Et perrumpere amat saxa potentius
            Ictu fulmineo.]
      - Ode XVI (bk. III, l. 12),
        (Francis' translation) [Gold]

The crowd of changeable citizens.
  [Lat., Mobilium turba Quiritium.]
      - Odes (bk. I, 1, 7) [Public]

Posterity, thinned by the crime of its ancestors, shall hear of those battles.
  [Lat., Audiet pugnas, vitio parentum
    Rara juventus.]
      - Odes (bk. I, 2, 23) [Posterity]

Virtue, dear friend, needs no defence,
  The surest guard is innocence:
    None knew, till guilt created fear,
      What darts or poison'd arrows were.
      - Odes (bk. I, ode XII, st. 1),
        (Wentworth Dillon's translation)
        [Virtue]

You are dealing with a work full of dangerous hazard, and you are venturing upon fires overlaid with treacherous ashes.
  [Lat., Periculosae plenum opus aleae
    Tractas, et incedis per ignes
      Suppositos cineri doloso.]
      - Odes (bk. II, 1, 6) [Danger]

To scorn the ill-conditioned rabble.
  [Lat., Malignum
    Spernere vulgus.]
      - Odes (bk. II, 16, 39) [Public]

I hate the uncultivated crowd and keep them at a distance. Favour me by your tongues (keep silence).
  [Lat., Odi profanum vulgus et arceo.
    Favete linguis.]
      - Odes (bk. III, 1) [Public]

To pile Pelion upon Olympus.
  [Lat., Pelion imposuisse Olympo.]
      - Odes (bk. III, 4, 52) [Mountains]

Many brave men lived before Agamemnon; but, all unwept and unknown, are lost in the distant night, since they are without a divine poet (to chronicle their deeds).
  [Lat., Vixere fortes ante Agamemnona
    Multi; sed omnes illacrimabiles
      Urguentur ignotique sacro.]
      - Odes (bk. IV, IX, 25) [Bravery]

And Tragedy should blush as much to stoop
  To the low mimic follies of a farce,
    As a grave matron would to dance with girls.
      - Of the Art of Poetry [Acting]

Boys must not have th' ambitious care of men,
  Nor men the weak anxieties of age.
      - Of the Art of Poetry [Age]

But every little busy scibbler now
  Swells with the prasies which he gives himself;
    And, taking sanctuary in the crowd,
      Brags of this impudence, and scorns to mend.
      - Of the Art of Poetry (475) [Authorship]


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