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HORACE (QUINTUS HORATIUS FLACCUS)
Roman poet
(65 BC - 8 BC)
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With what know shall I hold this Proteus, who so often changes his countenance?
  [Lat., Quo teneam vultus mutantem Protea nodo?]
      - Epistles (I, 1, 90) [Change]

He despises what he sought; and he seeks that which he lately threw away.
  [Lat., Quod petit spernit, repetit quod nuper omisit.]
      - Epistles (I, 1, 98) [Change]

You may turn nature out of doors with violence, but she will still return.
  [Lat., Naturam expellas furca, tamen usque recurrit.]
      - Epistles (I, 10, 24) [Nature]

Avoid greatness; in a cottage there may be more real happiness than kings or their favorites enjoy.
  [Lat., Fuge magna, licet sub paupere tecto
    Reges et regum vita procurrere amicos.]
      - Epistles (I, 10, 32) [Happiness]

He will always be a slave, who does not know how to live upto a little.
  [Lat., Serviet eternum qui parvo nesciet uti.]
      - Epistles (I, 10, 41) [Economy]

If a man's fortune does not fit him, it is like the shoe in the story; if too large it trips him up, if too small it pinches him.
  [Lat., Cui non conveniet sua res, ut calceus olim,
    Si pede major erit subvertet; si minor, uret.]
      - Epistles (I, 10, 42) [Fortune]

Riches either serve or govern the possessor.
  [Lat., Imperat aut servit collecta pecunia cuique.]
      - Epistles (I, 10, 47) [Wealth]

I live and reign since I have abandoned those pleasures which you by your praises extol to the skies.
  [Lat., Vivo et regno, simul ista reliqui
    Quae vos ad coelum effertis rumore secundo.]
      - Epistles (I, 10, 8) [Pleasure]

They change their sky, not their mind, who cross the sea. A busy idleness possesses us: we seek a happy life, with ships and carriages: the object of our search is present with us.
  [Lat., Coelum, non animum mutant, qui trans mare currunt.
    Strenua nos exercet inertia, navibus atque
      Quadrigis petimus bene vivere; quod petis hic est.]
      - Epistles (I, 11, 27) [Traveling]

What the discordant harmony of circumstances would and could effect.
  [Lat., Quid velit et possit rerum concordia discors.]
      - Epistles (I, 12, 19) [Circumstance]

He is not poor who has the use of necessary things.
  [Lat., Pauper enim non est cui rerum suppetet usus.]
      - Epistles (I, 12, 4) [Poverty]

The shame is not in having sported, but in not having broken off the sport.
  [Lat., Nec luisse pudet, sed non incidere ludum.]
      - Epistles (I, 14, 36) [Sport]

The lazy ox wishes for horse-trappings, and the steed wishes to plough.
  [Lat., Optat ephippia bos piger, optat arare caballus.]
      - Epistles (I, 14, 43) [Change]

The shame of fools conceals their open wounds.
  [Lat., Stultorum incurata malus pudor ulcera celat.]
      - Epistles (I, 16, 24) [Folly]

Who is a good man? He who keeps the decrees of the fathers, and both human and divine laws.
  [Lat., Vir bonus est quis?
    Qui consulta patrum, qui leges juraque servat.]
      - Epistles (I, 16, 40) [Goodness]

The wolf dreads the pitfall, the hawk suspects the snare, and the kite the covered hook.
  [Lat., Cautus enim metuit foveam lupus, accipiterque
    Suspectos laqueos, et opertum milvius hamum.]
      - Epistles (I, 16, 50) [Suspicion]

The good hate sin because they love virtue.
  [Lat., Oderunt peccare boni virtutis amore.]
      - Epistles (I, 16. 52) [Virtue]

Nor has he spent his life badly who has passed it in privacy.
  [Lat., Nec vixit male qui natus moriensque fefellit.]
      - Epistles (I, 17, 10) [Life]

To please great men is not the last degree of praise.
  [Lat., Principibus placuisse viris non ultima laus est.]
      - Epistles (I, 17, 35) [Praise]

Every man cannot go to Corinthum.
  [Lat., Non cuivis homini contingit adire Corinthum.]
      - Epistles (I, 17, 36) [Cities]

If the crow had been satisfied to eat his prey in silence, he would have had more meat and less quarreling and envy.
  [Lat., Sed tacitus pasci si posset corvus, haberet
    Plus dapis, et rixae multo minus invidiaeque.]
      - Epistles (I, 17, 50) [Satisfaction]

Let me posses what I now have, or even less, so that I may enjoy my remaining days, if Heaven grant any to remain.
  [Lat., Sit mihi quod nunc est, etiam minus et mihi vivam
    Quod superest aevi--si quid superesse volunt di.]
      - Epistles (I, 18, 107) [Contentment]

Never inquire into another man's secret; bur conceal that which is intrusted to you, though pressed both be wine and anger to reveal it.
  [Lat., Arcanum neque tu scrutaveris ullius unquam, commissumve teges et vino tortus et ira.]
      - Epistles (I, 18, 37) [Secrecy]

Shun the inquisitive person, for he is also a talker.
  [Lat., Percunctatorem fugito, nam garrulus idem est.]
      - Epistles (I, 18, 69) [Curiosity]

It is you who are discussed here.
  [Lat., Tua res agitur.]
      - Epistles (I, 18, 84) [Discussion]


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