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WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE
English dramatist and poet
(1564 - 1616)
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In nature's infinite book of secrecy
  A little I can read.
      - Antony and Cleopatra (Soothsayer at I, ii)
        [Nature]

O excellent! I love long life better than figs.
      - Antony and Cleopatra (Charmian at I, ii)
        [Life]

This grief is crowned with consolation, you old smock brings forth a new petticoat, and indeed the tears live in an onion that should water this sorrow.
      - Antony and Cleopatra (Enobarbus at I, ii)
        [Grief : Tears]

What our contempts do often hurl from us,
  We wish it ours again.
      - Antony and Cleopatra (Antony at I, ii)
        [Proverbs]

In time we hate that which we often fear.
      - Antony and Cleopatra (Charmian at I, iii)
        [Hatred]

Our Italy
  Shines o'er with civil swords; Sextus Pompeius
    Makes his approaches to the port of Rome;
      Equality of two domestic powers
        Breeds scrupulous faction; the hated, grown to strength,
          Are newly grown to love; the condemned Pompey,
            Rich in this father's honor, creeps apace
              Into the hearts of such as have not thrived
                Upon the present state, whose numbers threaten;
                  And quietness, grown sick of rest, would purge
                    By any desperate change.
      - Antony and Cleopatra (Antony at I, iii)
        [Equality]

But to confound such time
  That drums him from his sport and speaks as loud
    As his own state and ours, 'tis to be chid
      As we rate boys who, being mature in knowledge,
        Pawn their experience to the present pleasure
          And so rebel to judgment.
      - Antony and Cleopatra (Caesar at I, iv)
        [Pleasure]

I must not think there are
  Evils enow to darken all his goodness:
    His faults, in him, seem as the spots of heaven,
      More fiery by night's blackness; hereditary
        Rather than purchased, what he cannot change
          Than what he chooses.
      - Antony and Cleopatra (Lepidus at I, iv)
        [Change]

Like to the time o' th' year between the extremes
  Of hot and cold, he was not sad nor merry.
      - Antony and Cleopatra (Alexas at I, v)
        [Extremes]

My salad days,
  When I was green in judgment, cold in blood,
    To say as I said then.
      - Antony and Cleopatra (Cleopatra at I, v)
        [Youth]

Epicurean cooks
  Sharpen with cloyless sauce his appetite,
    That sleep and feeding may prorogue his honor
      Evan till a Lethe'd dulness--
      - Antony and Cleopatra (Pompey at II, i)
        [Appetite]

As for my wife,
  I would you had her spirit in such another;
    The third o' th' world is yours, which with a snaffle
      You may pace easy, but not such a wife.
      - Antony and Cleopatra (Antony at II, ii)
        [Wives]

For her own person,
  It beggar'd all description: she did lie
    In her pavilion, cloth-of-gold of tissue,
      O'erpicturing that Venus where we see
        The fancy outwork nature.
      - Antony and Cleopatra (Enobarbus at II, ii)
        [Admiration : Beauty]

From the barge
  A strange invisible perfume hits the sense
    Of the adjacent wharfs.
      - Antony and Cleopatra (Enobarbus at II, ii)
        [Perfume]

Never; he will not:
  Age cannot wither her, nor custom stale
    Her infinite variety: other women cloy
      The appetites they feed, but she makes hungry
        Where most she satisfies. For vilest things
          Become themselves in her, that the holy priests
            Bless her when she is riggish.
      - Antony and Cleopatra (Enobarbus at II, ii)
        [Women]

Our courteous Antony,
  Whom ne'er the word of 'no' woman heard speak,
    Being barbered ten times o'er, goes to the feast,
      And for his ordinary pays his heart
        For what his eyes eat only.
      - Antony and Cleopatra (Enobarbus at II, ii)
        [Barber]

That truth should be silent I had almost forgot.
      - Antony and Cleopatra (Enobarbus at II, ii)
        [Truth]

The barge she sat in, like a burnished throne,
  Burned on the water: the poop was beaten gold;
    Purple the sails, and so perfumed that
      The winds were lovesick with them; the oars were silver,
        Which to the tune of flutes kept stroke, and made
          The water which they beat to follow faster,
            As amorous of their strokes.
      - Antony and Cleopatra (Enobarbus at II, ii)
        [Boating : Perfume : Ships]

To hold you in perpetual amity,
  To make you brothers, and to knit your hearts
    With an unslipping knot, take Antony
      Octavia to his wife; whose beauty claims
        No worse a husband than the best of men;
          Whose virtue and whose general graces speak
            That which none else can utter.
      - Antony and Cleopatra (Agrippa at II, ii)
        [Husbands]

At land indeed
  Thou dost o'ercount me of my father's house:
    But since the cuckoo builds not for himself,
      Remain in't as thou mayst.
      - Antony and Cleopatra (Pompey at II, v)
        [Cuckoos]

Give me mine angle, we'll to th' river: there,
  My music playing far off, I will betray
    Tawny-finned fishes. My bended hook shall pierce
      Their slimy jaws; and as I draw them up,
        I'll think them every one an Antony,
          And say, 'Ah, ha! are caught!'
      - Antony and Cleopatra (Cleopatra at II, v)
        [Fishing]

Give me some music: music, moody food
  Of us that trade in love.
      - Antony and Cleopatra (Cleopatra at II, v)
        [Music]

I do not like 'but yet, it does allay
  The good precedence: fie upon 'but yet,'
    'But yet' is as a jailer to bring forth
      Some monstrous malefactor.
      - Antony and Cleopatra (Cleopatra at II, v)
        [Doubt]

Prithee, friend,
  Pour out the pack of matter to mine ear,
    The good and the bad together: he's friends with Caesar,
      In state of health, thou say'st, and thou say'st, free.
      - Antony and Cleopatra (Cleopatra at II, v)
        [News]

Ram thou fruitful tidings in mine ears,
  That long time have been barren.
      - Antony and Cleopatra (Cleopatra at II, v)
        [News]


Displaying page 71 of 186 for this author:   << Prev  Next >>  1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 [71] 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 128 129 130 131 132 133 134 135 136 137 138 139 140 141 142 143 144 145 146 147 148 149 150 151 152 153 154 155 156 157 158 159 160 161 162 163 164 165 166 167 168 169 170 171 172 173 174 175 176 177 178 179 180 181 182 183 184 185 186

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