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WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE
English dramatist and poet
(1564 - 1616)
  CHECK READING LIST (43)    << Prev Page    Displaying page 161 of 186    Next Page >> 

There is no vice so simple, but assumes
  Some mark of virtue on his outward parts.
      - The Merchant of Venice
         (Bassanio at III, ii) [Proverbs]

What find I here?
  Fair Portia's counterfeit! What demigod
    Hath come so near creation? Move these eyes?
      Or whether, riding on the balls of mine,
        Seem they in motion?
      - The Merchant of Venice
         (Bassanio at III, ii) [Painting]

Your fortune stood upon the caskets there,
  And so did mine too, as the matter falls;
    For wooing here until I sweat again,
      And swearing till my very roof was dry
        With oaths of love, at last--if promise last--
          I got a promise of this fair one here
            To have her love, provided that your fortune
              Achieved her mistress.
      - The Merchant of Venice
         (Gratiano at III, ii) [Love]

But come, I'll tell thee all my whole device
  When I am in my coach, which stays for us
    At the park gate; and therefore haste away,
      For we must measure twenty miles to-day.
      - The Merchant of Venice (Portia at III, iv)
        [Livery]

He tells me flatly there's no mercy for me in heaven because I am a Jew's daughter; and he says you are no good member of the commonwealth, for in converting Jews to Christians you raise the price of pork.
      - The Merchant of Venice (Jessica at III, v)
        [Christianity]

No, pray thee, let it serve for table-talk;
  Then howsome'er thou speak'st, 'mong other things
    I shall digest it.
      - The Merchant of Venice (Lorenzo at III, v)
        [Talk]

The fool hath planted in this memory
  An army of good words; and I do know
    A many fools that stand in better place,
      Garnished like him, that for a tricksy word
        Defy the matter.
      - The Merchant of Venice (Lorenzo at III, v)
        [Folly]

This making of Christians will raise the price of hogs; if we grow all to be pork-eaters, we shall not shortly have a rasher on the coals for money.
      - The Merchant of Venice
         (Launcelot at III, v) [Christianity]

Thus when I shun Scylla your father, I fall into Charybdis your mother.
      - The Merchant of Venice
         (Launcelot at III, v) [Danger]

A Daniel come to judgment! yea, a Daniel!
      - The Merchant of Venice (Shylock at IV, i)
        [Judgment : Proverbs]

A Daniel still say I, a second Daniel!
  I thank thee, Jew, for teaching me that word.
      - The Merchant of Venice (Gratiano at IV, i)
        [Proverbs]

An oath, an oath! I have an oath in heaven;
  Shall I lay perjury upon my soul?
    No, not for Venice!
      - The Merchant of Venice (Shylock at IV, i)
        [Oaths]

. . . And where thou now exacts the penalty,
  Which is a pound of this poor merchant's flesh,
    Thou will not only loose the forfeiture,
      But touched with human gentleness and love,
        Forgive a moiety of the principal,
          Glancing an eye of pity on his losses,
            That have of late so huddled on his back--
              Enow to press a royal merchant down
                And pluck commiseration of his state
                  From brassy bosoms and rough hearts of flint,
                    From stubborn Turks and Tartars never trained
                      To offices of tender courtesy.
      - The Merchant of Venice
         (Duke of Venice at IV, i) [Business]

Grieve not that am fall'n to this for you,
  For herein Fortune shows herself more kind
    Than is her custom: it is still her use
      To let the wretched man outlive his wealth
        To view with hollow eye and wrinkled brow
          An age of poverty; from which ling'ring penance
            Of such misery doth cut me off.
      - The Merchant of Venice (Antonio at IV, i)
        [Poverty]

He is well paid that is well satisfied,
  And I delivering you am satisfied,
    And therein do account myself well paid;
      My mind was never yet more mercenary.
      - The Merchant of Venice (Portia at IV, i)
        [Satisfaction]

He shall have merely justice and his bond.
      - The Merchant of Venice (Portia at IV, i)
        [Justice]

I charge you by the law,
  Whereof you are a well-deserving pillar,
    Proceed to judgment.
      - The Merchant of Venice (Shylock at IV, i)
        [Judgment]

I have heard
  Your Grace hath ta'en great pains to qualify
    His rigourous course; but since he stands obdurate,
      And that no lawful means can carry me
        Out of his envy's reach, I do oppose
          My patience to his fury, and am armed
            To suffer with a quietness of spirit
              The very tyranny and rage of his.
      - The Merchant of Venice (Antonio at IV, i)
        [Patience]

I see, sir, you are liberal in offers.
  You taught me first to beg, and now methinks
    You teach me how a beggar should be answered.
      - The Merchant of Venice (Portia at IV, i)
        [Beggary]

I stand for judgment. Answer; shall I have it?
      - The Merchant of Venice (Shylock at IV, i)
        [Judgment]

I thank thee, Jew, for teaching me that word.
      - The Merchant of Venice (Gratiano at IV, i)
        [Proverbs]

It doth appear you are a worthy judge;
  You know the law, your exposition
    Hath been most sound.
      - The Merchant of Venice (Shylock at IV, i)
        [Judges]

Not on thy sole, but on thy soul, harsh Jew,
  Thou mak'st thy knife keen; but no metal can--
    No, not the hangman's axe--bear half the keenness
      Of thy sharp envy.
      - The Merchant of Venice (Gratiano at IV, i)
        [Envy]

Now, infidel, I have you on the hip!
      - The Merchant of Venice (Gratiano at IV, i)
        [Infidelity : Proverbs : Revenge]

The quality of mercy is not strained;
  It droppeth as the gentle rain from heaven
    Upon the place beneath. It is twice blest;
      It blesseth him that gives and him that takes.
        'Tis mightiest in the mightiest; it becomes
          The throned monarch better than his crown.
            His sceptre shows the force of temporal power,
              The attribute to awe and majesty,
                Wherein doth sit the dread and fear of kings;
                  But mercy is above this scept'red sway;
                    It is enthroned in the hearts of kings;
                      It is an attribute to God himself,
                        And earthly power doth then show likest God's
                          When mercy seasons justice.
      - The Merchant of Venice (Portia at IV, i)
        [Mercy]


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