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WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE
English dramatist and poet
(1564 - 1616)
  CHECK READING LIST (43)    << Prev Page    Displaying page 97 of 186    Next Page >> 

Therefore, friends,
  As far as to the sepulchre of Christ--
    Whose soldier now, under whose blessed cross
      We are impressed and engaged to fight--
        Fourthwith a power of English shall we levy,
          Whose arms were moulded in their mother's womb
            To chase these pagans in those holy fields
              Over whose acres walked those blessed feet
                Which fourteen hundred years ago were nailed
                  For our advantage on the bitter cross.
      - King Henry the Fourth, Part I
         (King Henry at I, i) [Christ]

As the honey of Hybla, my old lad of the castle--and is not a buff jerkin in a most sweet robe of durance?
      - King Henry the Fourth, Part I
         (Prince Henry at I, ii) [Proverbs]

(Falstaff:) By the Lord, thou say'st true, lad--and is not my hostess of the tavern a most sweet wench?
  (Prince Henry:) As the honey of Hybla, my old lad of the castle--and is not a buff jerkin a most sweet robe of durance?
      - King Henry the Fourth, Part I
         (Falstaff & Prince Henry at I, ii)
        [Women]

He will give the devil his due.
      - King Henry the Fourth, Part I
         (Prince Henry at I, ii) [Devil]

I would to God thou and I knew where a commodity of good names were to be bought.
      - King Henry the Fourth, Part I
         (Falstaff at I, ii) [Names]

I'll be damned for never a king's son in Christendom.
      - King Henry the Fourth, Part I
         (Falstaff at I, ii) [Swearing]

If all the year were playing holidays,
  To sport would be as tedious as to work;
    And nothing pleaseth but rare accidents.
      - King Henry the Fourth, Part I
         (Prince Henry at I, ii) [Holidays]

So, when this loose behavior I throw off
  And pay the debt I never promised,
    By how much better than my word I am,
      By so much shall I falsify men's hopes;
        And, like bright metal on a sullen ground,
          My reformation, glitt'ring o'er my fault,
            Shall show more goodly and attract more eyes
              Than that which hath no foil to set it off.
      - King Henry the Fourth, Part I
         (Prince Henry at I, ii) [Reformation]

There's neither honesty, manhood, nor good fellowship in thee, nor thou cam'st not of the blood royal if thou darest not stand for ten shillings.
      - King Henry the Fourth, Part I
         (Falstaff at I, ii) [Character]

Why, Hal, 'tis my vocation, Hal. 'Tis no sin for a man to labor in his vocation.
      - King Henry the Fourth, Part I
         (Falstaff at I, ii) [Labor]

Yea, and so used it that, were it not here apparent that thou art heir apparent--But I prithee, sweet wag, shall there be gallows standing in England when thou art King? and of resolution thus fubbed as it is with the rusty curb of old father antic the law? Do not thou, when thou art king, hand a thief.
      - King Henry the Fourth, Part I
         (Falstaff at I, ii) [Law]

And his chin new reaped,
  Showed like a stubble land at harvest home.
      - King Henry the Fourth, Part I (I, iii)
        [Tonsorial]

And telling me the sovereignest thing on earth
  Was parmacity for an inward bruise,
    And that it was great pity, so it was,
      This villainous saltpetre should be digged
        Out of the bowels of the harmless earth,
          Which many a good tall fellow had destroyed
            So cowardly, and but for these vile guns,
              He would himself have been a soldier.
      - King Henry the Fourth, Part I
         (Hotspur at I, iii) [War]

But I remember, when the fight was done,
  When I was dry with rage and extreme toil,
    Breathless and faint, leaning upon my sword,
      Came there a certain lord, neat and trimly dressed,
        Fresh as a bridegroom, and his chin new reaped
          Showed like a stubble land at harvest home.
      - King Henry the Fourth, Part I
         (Hotspur at I, iii) [Barber : Hair]

By heaven, methinks it were an easy leap
  To pluck bright honor from the pale-faced moon,
    Or dive into the bottom of the deep,
      Where fathom line could never touch the ground,
        And pluck up drowned honor by the locks,
          So he that doth redeem her thence might wear
            Without corrival all her dignities;
              But out upon this half-faced fellowship!
      - King Henry the Fourth, Part I
         (Hotspur at I, iii) [Friendship : Honor]

God save the mark!
      - King Henry the Fourth, Part I
         (Hotspur at I, iii) [Proverbs]

He was perfumed like a milliner,
  And 'twixt his finger and his thumb he held
    A pouncet-box, which ever and anon
      He gave his nose, and took't away again;
        Who therewith angry, when it next came there,
          Took it in snuff; and still he smiled and talked'
            And as the soldiers bore dead bodies by,
              He called them untaught knaves, unmannerly,
                To bring a slovenly unhandsome corse
                  Betwixt the wind and his nobility.
      - King Henry the Fourth, Part I
         (Hotspur at I, iii) [Tobacco]

O, the blood more stirs
  To rouse a lion than to start a hare!
      - King Henry the Fourth, Part I
         (Hotspur at I, iii) [Action : Courage]

What, drunk with choler?
      - King Henry the Fourth, Part I
         (Northumberland at I, iii) [Anger]

A plague upon it when thieves cannot be true one to another!
      - King Henry the Fourth, Part I
         (Falstaff at II, ii) [Thieving]

Farewell and stand fast.
      - King Henry the Fourth, Part I
         (Poins at II, ii) [Farewell]

I know you wise, but yet no farther wise
  Than Harry Percy's wife; constant you are,
    But yet a woman; and for secrecy,
      No lady closer, for I well believe
        Thou wilt not utter what thou dost not know,
          And so far will I trust thee, gentle Kate.
      - King Henry the Fourth, Part I
         (Hotspur at II, iii) [Trust]

Now out of this nettle, danger, will I pluck the flower, safety.
      - King Henry the Fourth, Part I
         (Hotspur at II, iii) [Proverbs]

Out of this nettle, danger, we pluck this flower, safety.
      - King Henry the Fourth, Part I
         (Hotspur at II, iii) [Danger : Proverbs]

'Tis dangerous to take a cold, to sleep, to drink; but I tell you, my lord fool, out of this nettle, danger, we pluck this flower, safety.
      - King Henry the Fourth, Part I
         (Hotspur at II, iii) [Danger : Proverbs]


Displaying page 97 of 186 for this author:   << Prev  Next >>  1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 [97] 98 99 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 128 129 130 131 132 133 134 135 136 137 138 139 140 141 142 143 144 145 146 147 148 149 150 151 152 153 154 155 156 157 158 159 160 161 162 163 164 165 166 167 168 169 170 171 172 173 174 175 176 177 178 179 180 181 182 183 184 185 186

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