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WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE
English dramatist and poet
(1564 - 1616)
  CHECK READING LIST (43)    << Prev Page    Displaying page 167 of 186    Next Page >> 

And now, my honey love,
  Will we return unto thy father's house
    And revel it as bravely as the best,
      With silken coats and caps and golden rings,
        With ruffs and cuffs and farthingales and things;
          With scarfs and fans and double change of brav'ry,
            With amber bracelets, beads, and all this knav'ry.
      - The Taming of the Shrew
         (Petruchio at IV, iii) [Apparel]

As the sun breaks through the darkest clouds,
  So honour peereth in the meanest habit.
      - The Taming of the Shrew
         (Petruchio at IV, iii) [Proverbs]

For 'tis the mind that makes the body rich;
  And as the sun breaks through the darkest clouds,
    So honour peereth in the meanest habit.
      - The Taming of the Shrew
         (Petruchio at IV, iii) [Proverbs]

I fear it is too choleric a meat.
  How say you to a fat tripe finely broiled?
      - The Taming of the Shrew
         (Grumio at IV, iii) [Eating]

Our purses shall be proud, our garments poor,
  For 'tis the mind that make the body rich;
    And as the sun breaks through the darkest clouds
      So honor peereth in the meanest habit.
      - The Taming of the Shrew
         (Petruchio at IV, iii) [Mind]

(Petruchio:) It shall be what o'clock I say it is.
  (Hortensio:) Why, so this gallant will command the sun.
      - The Taming of the Shrew
         (Petruchio & Hortensio at IV, iii) [Sun]

Pluck up thy spirits, look cheerfully upon me.
  Here, love, thou seest how diligent I am
    To dress thy meat myself and bring it thee.
      - The Taming of the Shrew
         (Petruchio at IV, iii) [Cheerfulness]

So honour peereth in the meanest habit.
      - The Taming of the Shrew
         (Petruchio at IV, iii) [Proverbs]

The more my wrong, the more his spite appears.
      - The Taming of the Shrew
         (Katharina at IV, iii) [Proverbs]

Thy gown? Why, ay--come, tailor, let us see't.
  O mercy, God, what masquing stuff is there?
    What's this, a sleeve? 'Tis like a demi-cannon.
      What, up and down carved like an apple tart?
        Here's snip and nip and cut and slish and slash,
          Like to a censer in a barber's shop.
            Why, what's a devil's name, tailor, call'st thou this?
      - The Taming of the Shrew
         (Petruchio at IV, iii) [Tailors]

Well, come, my Kate; we will unto your father's,
  Even in these honest mean habiliments.
    Our purses shall be proud, our garments poor,
      For 'tis the mind that makes the body rich;
        And as the sun breaks through the darkest clouds
          So honor peereth in the meanest habit.
      - The Taming of the Shrew
         (Petruchio at IV, iii) [Dignity : Honor]

What say you to a piece of beef and mustard?
      - The Taming of the Shrew
         (Grumio at IV, iii) [Eating]

What, is the jay more precious than the lark
  Because his feathers are more beautiful?
    Or is the adder better than the eel
      Because his painted skin contents the eye?
      - The Taming of the Shrew
         (Petruchio at IV, iii) [Comparison : Jays]

My cake is dough, but I'll in among the rest,
  Out of hope of all but my share of the feast.
      - The Taming of the Shrew (Gremio at V, i)
        [Eating]

To leave frivolous circumstances, I pray you tell Signior Lucentio that his father is come from Pisa and is here at the door to speak with him.
      - The Taming of the Shrew
         (Petruchio at V, i) [Circumstance]

A woman moved is like a fountain troubled,
  Muddy, ill-seeming, thick, bereft of beauty,
    And while it is so, none so dry or thirsty
      Will deign to sip or touch one drop of it.
      - The Taming of the Shrew (Kate at V, ii)
        [Women]

Thy husband is thy lord, thy life, thy keeper,
  Thy head, thy sovereign; one that cares for thee
    And for thy maintenance; commits his body
      To painful labor both by sea and land,
        To watch the night in storms, the day in cold,
          Whilst thou li'st warm at home, secure and safe;
            And craves no other tribute at thy hands
              But love, fair looks, and true obedience--
                Too little payment for so great a debt.
                  Such duty as the subject owes the prince,
                    Even such a woman oweth to her husband;
                      And when she is froward, peevish, sullen, sour,
                        And not obedient to his honest will,
                          What is she but a foul contending rebel
                            And graceless traitor to her loving lord?
      - The Taming of the Shrew (Kate at V, ii)
        [Husbands : Matrimony]

'Tis a wonder, by your leave, she will be tamed so.
      - The Taming of the Shrew
         (Lucentio at V, ii) [Books (Last Lines)]

Why are our bodies soft and weak and smooth,
  Unapt to toil and trouble in the world,
    But that our soft conditions and our hearts
      Should well agree with our external parts?
      - The Taming of the Shrew (Kate at V, ii)
        [Women]

Gentle breath of yours my sails
  Must fill, or else my project fails,
    Which was to please. Now I want
      Spirits to enforce, art to enchant;
        And my ending is despair
          Unless I be relieved by prayer,
            Which pierces so that it assaults
              Mercy itself and frees all faults.
                As you from crimes would pardoned be,
                  Let your indulgence set me free.
      - The Tempest (Prospero at epilogue)
        [Books (Last Lines)]

Boatswain!
      - The Tempest (Master at I, i)
        [Books (First Lines)]

Now would I give a thousand furlongs of sea for an acre of barren ground--long heath, brown furze, anything. The wills above be done, but I would fain die a dry death.
      - The Tempest (Gonzalo at I, i)
        [Death : Proverbs]

Now would I give a thousand furlongs of sea for an acre of barren ground--long heath, brown furze, anything.
      - The Tempest (Gonzalo at I, i)
        [Death : Proverbs]

All but mariners
  Plunged in the foaming brine and quit the vessel;
    Then all afire with me the King's son Ferdinand,
      With hair up-standing (then liek reeds, not hair),
        Was the first man that leapt; cried 'Hell is empty,
          And all the devils are here!'
      - The Tempest (Ariel at I, ii) [Hell]

But this swift business
  I must uneasy make, lest too light winning
    Make the prize light.
      - The Tempest (Prospero at I, ii) [Proverbs]


Displaying page 167 of 186 for this author:   << Prev  Next >>  1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 128 129 130 131 132 133 134 135 136 137 138 139 140 141 142 143 144 145 146 147 148 149 150 151 152 153 154 155 156 157 158 159 160 161 162 163 164 165 166 [167] 168 169 170 171 172 173 174 175 176 177 178 179 180 181 182 183 184 185 186

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