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WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE
English dramatist and poet
(1564 - 1616)
  CHECK READING LIST (43)    << Prev Page    Displaying page 181 of 186    Next Page >> 

Come, quench your blushes and present yourself
  That which you are, mistress o' th' feast.
      - The Winter's Tale (Shepherd at IV, iv)
        [Blushes]

Even here undone!
  I was not much afeard; for once or twice
    I was about to speak and tell him plainly
      The selfsame sun that shines upon his court
        Hides not his visage from our cottage but
          Looks on alike.
      - The Winter's Tale (Perdita at IV, iv)
        [Sun]

He seems to be of great authority. Close with him, give him gold; and though authority be a stubborn bear, yet he is oft led by the nose with gold.
      - The Winter's Tale (Clown at IV, iv)
        [Authority]

Here's another ballad of a fish that appeared upon the coast on Wednesday the fourscore of April, forty thousand fathom above water, and sung this ballad against the hard heart of maids. It was though she was a woman and was turned into a cold fish for she would not exchange flesh with one that loved her.
      - The Winter's Tale (Autolycus at IV, iv)
        [Fish]

Here's flowers for you,
  Hot lavender, mints, savory, marjoram,
    The marigold, that goes to bed wi' th' sun.
      And with him rises weeping.
      - The Winter's Tale (Perdita at IV, iv)
        [Marigolds]

I love a ballad but even too well if it be doleful matter merrily set down, or a very pleasant thing indeed and sung lamentably.
      - The Winter's Tale (Clown at IV, iv)
        [Ballads]

I would I had some flowers o' th' spring that might
  Become your time of day, and yours, and yours,
    That wear upon your virgin branches yet
      Your maidenheads growing. O, Proserpina,
        For the flowers now that, frighted, thou let'st fall
          From Dis's wagon; daffodils,
            That come before the swallow dares, and take
              The winds of March with beauty; violets dim,
                But sweeter than the lids of Juno's eyes
                  Or Cytherea's breath; pale primroses,
                    That die unmarried, ere they can behold
                      Bright Phoebus in his strength--a malady
                        Most incident to maids; bold oxlips and
                          The crown imperial; lilies of all kinds,
                            The flower-de-luce being one.
      - The Winter's Tale (Perdita at IV, iv)
        [Daffodils : Flowers]

Lawn as white as driven snow,
  Cyprus black as e'er was crow,
    Gloves as sweet as damask roses,
      Masks for faces and for noses,
        Bugle bracelet, necklace amber,
          Perfume for a lady's chamber,
            Golden quoifs and stomachers
              For my lads to give their dears,
                Pins and poking-sticks of steel,
                  What maids lack from head to heel.
      - The Winter's Tale (Autolycus at IV, iv)
        [Perfume : Snow]

Methinks a father
  Is at the nuptial of his son a guest
    That best becomes the table.
      - The Winter's Tale (Polixenes at IV, iv)
        [Guests]

O Prosperina,
  For the flowers now that, frighted, thou let'st fall
    From Dis's wagon; daffodils,
      That come before the swallow dares, and take
        The winds of March with beauty; violets dim,
          But sweeter than the lids of Juno's eyes
            Or Cytherea's breath; pale primroses,
              That die unmarried, ere they can behold
                Bright Phoebus in his strength--a malady
                  Most incident to maids; bold oxlips and
                    The crown imperial; lilies of all kinds,
                      The flower-de-luce being one.
      - The Winter's Tale (Perdita at IV, iv)
        [Flowers]

Say there be;
  Yet nature is made better by no mean
    But nature makes that mean. So, over that art
      Which you say adds to nature, is an art
        That nature makes.
      - The Winter's Tale (Polixenes at IV, iv)
        [Nature]

See, your guests approach.
  Address yourself to entertain them sprightly,
    And let's be red with mirth.
      - The Winter's Tale (Florizel at IV, iv)
        [Guests]

Sir, the year growing ancient,
  Not yet on summer's death nor on the birth
    Of trembling winter, the fairest flowers o' th' season
      Are our carnations and streaked gillyvors,
        Which some call nature's bastards.
      - The Winter's Tale (Perdita at IV, iv)
        [Flowers]

Though I am not naturally honest, I am so sometimes by chance.
      - The Winter's Tale (Autolycus at IV, iv)
        [Honesty : Proverbs]

When you do dance, I wish you
  A wave o' th' sea, that you might ever do
    Nothing but that, move still, still so,
      And own no other function.
      - The Winter's Tale (Perdita at IV, iv)
        [Dancing]

You'ld be so lean that blasts of January
  Would blow you through and through.
      - The Winter's Tale (Perdita at IV, iv)
        [January]

If one by one you wedded all the world,
  Or from the all that are took something good
    To make a perfect woman, she you killed
      Would be unparalleled.
      - The Winter's Tale (Paulina at V, i)
        [Women]

Women will love her that she is a woman
  More worth than any man; men, that she is
    The rarest of all women.
      - The Winter's Tale (Servant at V, i)
        [Women]

How goes it now, sir? This news which is called true is so like an old tale that the verity of it is in strong suspicion.
      - The Winter's Tale
         (Second Gentleman at V, ii) [News]

There was speech in their dumbness, language in their very gesture.
      - The Winter's Tale
         (First Gentleman at V, ii) [Language]

Good Paulina,
  Lead us from hence, where we may leisurely
    Each one demand and answer to his part
      Performed in this wide gap of time since first
        We were dissevered. Hastily lead away.
      - The Winter's Tale (Leontes at V, iii)
        [Books (Last Lines)]

Give me a staff of honor for mine age,
  But not a sceptre to control the world.
      - Titus Andronicus (Titus at I, i) [Age]

No man shed tears for noble Mutius;
  He lives in fame that died in virtue's cause.
      - Titus Andronicus (All at I, i) [Fame]

Noble patricians, patrons of my right,
  Defend the justice of my cause with arms.
    And, countrymen, my loving followers,
      Plead my successive title with your swords.
      - Titus Andronicus (Saturninus at I, i)
        [Books (First Lines)]

Sweet mercy is nobility's true badge.
      - Titus Andronicus (Tamora at I, i)
        [Proverbs]


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