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WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE
English dramatist and poet
(1564 - 1616)
  CHECK READING LIST (43)    << Prev Page    Displaying page 180 of 186    Next Page >> 

Swear his thought over
  By each particular star in heaven and
    By all their influences, you may as well
      Forbid the sea for to obey the moon
        As or by oath remove or counsel shake
          The fabric of his folly, whose foundation
            Is piled upon his faith and will continue
              The standing of his body.
      - The Winter's Tale (Camillo at I, ii)
        [Folly]

We were as twinned lambs that did frisk i' th' sun,
  And bleat the one at th' other. What we changed
    Was innocence for innocence; we knew not
      The doctrine of ill-doing, nor dreamed
        That any did.
      - The Winter's Tale (Polixenes at I, ii)
        [Innocence]

A sad tale's best for winter. I have one
  Of sprites and goblins.
      - The Winter's Tale (Mamillius at II, i)
        [Winter]

But I have
  That honorable grief lodged here which burns
    Worse than tears drown.
      - The Winter's Tale (Hermione at II, i)
        [Grief]

Not for because
  Your brows are blacker. Yet black brows, they say,
    Become some women best, so that there be not
      Too much hair there, but in a semicircle,
        Or a half-moon made with a pen.
      - The Winter's Tale (Mamillius at II, i)
        [Eyes]

Praise her but for this her without-door form--
  Which on my faith deserves high speech--and straight
    The shrug, the hum or ha, these pretty brands
      That calumny doth use--O, I am out,
        That mercy does, for calumny will sear
          Virtue itself--these shrugs, these hums and ha's,
            When you have said she's goodly, come between
              Ere you can say she's honest.
      - The Winter's Tale (Leontes at II, i)
        [Calumny]

There's some ill planet reigns.
  I must be patient till the heavens look
    With an aspect more favorable.
      - The Winter's Tale (Hermione at II, i)
        [Astronomy]

A daughter, and a goodly babe,
  Lusty and like to live. The queen receives
    Much comfort in't, says, 'My poor prisoner,
      I am innocent as you.'
      - The Winter's Tale (Emilia at II, ii)
        [Babyhood]

The silence often of pure innocence
  Persuades, when speaking fails.
      - The Winter's Tale (Paulina at II, ii)
        [Proverbs]

Behold, my lords.
  Although the print be little, the whole matter
    And copy of the father--eye, nose, lip,
      The trick of's frown, his forehead, nay, the valley,
        The pretty dimples of his chin and cheek, his smiles,
          The very mould and frame of hand, nail, finger.
      - The Winter's Tale (Paulina at II, iii)
        [Childhood]

I am a feather for each wind that blows.
      - The Winter's Tale (Leontes at II, iii)
        [Vacillation]

But thus: if powers divine
  Behold our human actions, as they do,
    I doubt not then but innocence shall make
      False accusation blush and tyranny
        Tremble at patience.
      - The Winter's Tale (Hermione at III, ii)
        [Innocence]

But, O thou tyrant,
  Do not repent these things, for they are heavier
    Than all thy woes can stir. Therefore betake thee
      To nothing but despair.
      - The Winter's Tale (Paulina at III, ii)
        [Despair]

If I shall be condemned
  Upon surmises, all proofs sleeping else
    But what your jealousies awake, I tell you
      'Tis rigor and not law.
      - The Winter's Tale (Hermione at III, ii)
        [Jealousy]

What's gone and what's past help
  Should be past grief.
      - The Winter's Tale (Paulina at III, ii)
        [Grief]

What's gone, and what's past help,
  Should be past grieve.
      - The Winter's Tale (Paulina at III, ii)
        [Proverbs]

Exit, pursued by a bear.
      - The Winter's Tale (III, iii),
        the stage direction at end of scene
        [Endings]

Jog on, jog on, the foot-path way,
  And merrily hent the stile-a.
    A merry heart goes all the day,
      Your sad tires in a mile-a.
      - The Winter's Tale (Song at IV, iii)
        [Merriment]

My father names me Autolycus, who being, as I am, littered under Mercury, was likewise a snapper-up of unconsidered trifles.
      - The Winter's Tale (Autolycus at IV, iii)
        [Trifles]

She hath made me four and twenty nosegays for the shearers--three-man songmen all, and very good ones; but they are most of them means and bases, but one puritan amongst them, and he sings psalms to hornpipes.
      - The Winter's Tale (Clown at IV, iii)
        [Singing]

Address yourself to entertain them sprightly,
  And let's be red with mirth.
      - The Winter's Tale (Florizel at IV, iv)
        [Merriment]

And you, enchantment,
  Worthy enough a herdsman--yea, him too,
    That makes himself, but for our honor therein,
      Unworthy thee-if ever henceforth thou
        These rural latches to his entrance open,
          Or hoop his body more with thy embraces,
            I will devise a death as cruel for thee
              As thou art tender to't.
      - The Winter's Tale (Polixenes at IV, iv)
        [Cruelty]

Besides, you know
  Prosperity's the very bond of love,
    Whose fresh complexion and whose heart together
      Affliction alters.
      - The Winter's Tale (Camillo at IV, iv)
        [Prosperity]

But as th' unthought-on accident is guilty
  To what we wildly do, so we profess
    Ourselves to be the slaves of chance, and flies
      Of every wind that blows.
      - The Winter's Tale (Florizel at IV, iv)
        [Chance]

But that our feasts
  In every mess have folly, and the feeders
    Digest it with a custom, I should blush
      To see you so attired, swoon, I think,
        To show myself a glass.
      - The Winter's Tale (Perdita at IV, iv)
        [Eating]


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