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WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE
English dramatist and poet
(1564 - 1616)
  CHECK READING LIST (43)    << Prev Page    Displaying page 171 of 186    Next Page >> 

The setting sun, and music at the close,
  As the last taste of sweets, is sweetest last,
    Writ in remembrance more than things long past.
      - The Tragedy of King Richard the Second
         (Gaunt at II, i) [Sunset]

They say the tongues of dying men enforce attention like deep harmony.
      - The Tragedy of King Richard the Second
         (Gaunt at II, i) [Death]

This royal throne of kings, this scept'red isle,
  This earth of majesty, this seat of Mars,
    This other Eden, demi-paradise,
      This fortress built by Nature for herself
        Against infection and the hand of war,
          This happy breed of men, this little world,
            This precious stone set in the silver sea,
              Which serves it in the office of a wall,
                Or as a moat defensive to a house,
                  Against the envy of less happier lands;
                    This blessed plot, this earth, this realm, this England,
                      This nurse, this teeming womb of royal kings,
                        Feared by their breed and famous by their birth,
                          Renowned for their deeds as far from home,
                            For Christian service and true chivalry,
                              As is the sepulchre in stubborn Jewry
                                Of the world's ransom, blessed Mary's son;
                                  This land of such dear souls, this dear dear land,
                                    Dear for her reputation through the world,
                                      Is now leased out (I die pronouncing it)
                                        Like to a tenement or pelting farm.
      - The Tragedy of King Richard the Second
         (Gaunt at II, i) [England : Ocean]

Thy deathbed is no lesser than thy land,
  Wherein thou liest in reputation sick;
    And thou, too careless patient as thou art,
      Committ'st thy anointed body to the cure
        Of those physicians that first wounded thee.
      - The Tragedy of King Richard the Second
         (Gaunt at II, i) [Reputation]

Where doth the world thrust forth a vanity
  (So it be new, there's no respect how vile)
    That is not quickly buzzed into his ears?
      - The Tragedy of King Richard the Second
         (York at II, i) [Vanity]

Each substance of a grief hath twenty shadows,
  Which shows like grief itself, but is not so;
    For sorrow's eye, glazed with blinding tears,
      Divides one thing entire to many objects,
        Like perspectives, which rightly gazed upon,
          Show nothing but confusion--eyed awry,
            Distinguish form.
      - The Tragedy of King Richard the Second
         (Bushy at II, ii) [Grief]

And yet your fair discourse hath been as sugar,
  Making the hard way sweet and delectable.
      - The Tragedy of King Richard the Second
         (Northumberland at II, iii) [Proverbs]

I am a subject,
  And I challenge law. Attorneys are denied me,
    And therefore personally I lay my claim
      To my inheritance of free descent.
      - The Tragedy of King Richard the Second
         (Bolingbroke at II, iii) [Law]

I thank thee, gently Percy; and be sure
  I count myself in nothing else so happy
    As in a soul rememb'ring my good friends;
      And, as my fortune ripens with thy love,
        It shall be still thy true love's recompense.
      - The Tragedy of King Richard the Second
         (Bolingbroke at II, iii) [Memory]

These high wild hills and rough uneven ways
  Draws out our miles and makes them wearisome;
    And yet your fair discourse hath been as sugar,
      Making the hard way sweet and delectable.
      - The Tragedy of King Richard the Second
         (Northumberland at II, iii) [Speech]

Things past redress are now with me past care.
      - The Tragedy of King Richard the Second
         (York at II, iii) [Care]

The bay trees in our country all are withered,
  And meteors fright the fixed stars of heaven;
    The pale-faced moon look bloody on the earth,
      And lean-looked prophets whisper fearful change;
        Rich men look sad, and ruffians dance and leap--
          The one in fear to lose what they enjoy,
            The other to enjoy by rage and war.
      - The Tragedy of King Richard the Second
         (Welsh Captain at II, iv) [War]

Myself--a prince by fortune of my birth,
  Near to the king in blood, and near in love
    Till you did make him misinterpret me--
      Have stooped my neck under your injuries
        And sighed my English breath in foreign clouds,
          Eating the bitter bread of banishment,
            Whilst you have fed upon my signories,
              Disparked my parks and felled my forest woods,
                From my own windows torn my household coat,
                  Rased out my imprese, leaving me no sign,
                    Save men's opinions and my living blood,
                      To show the world I am a gentleman.
      - The Tragedy of King Richard the Second
         (Bolingbroke at III, i) [Banishment]

Cry woe, destruction, ruin, and decay:
  The worst is death, and death will have his day.
      - The Tragedy of King Richard the Second
         (King Richard at III, ii) [Death]

Death will have his day.
      - The Tragedy of King Richard the Second
         (King Richard at III, ii) [Proverbs]

Discomfort guides my tongue
  And bids me speak of nothing but despair.
      - The Tragedy of King Richard the Second
         (Salisbury at III, ii) [Despair]

Discomfortable cousin! know'st thou not
  That when the searching eye of heaven is hid
    Behind the globe, that lights the lower world,
      Then thieves and robbers range abroad unseen
        In murders and in outrage boldly here;
          But when from under this terrestrial ball
            He fires the proud tops of the eastern pines
              And darts his light through every guilty hole,
                Then murders, treasons, and detested sins,
                  The cloak of night being plucked from off their backs,
                    Stand bare and naked, trembling at themselves?
      - The Tragedy of King Richard the Second
         (King Richard at III, ii) [Sunrise]

For God's sake let us sit upon the ground
  And tell sad stories of the death of kings!
    How some have been deposed, some slain in war,
      Some haunted by the ghosts they have deposed,
        Some poisoned by their wives, some sleeping killed--
          All murdered; for within the hollow crown
            That rounds the mortal temples of a king
              Keeps Death his court; and there the antic sits,
                Scoffing his state and grinning at his pomp;
                  Allowing him a breath, a little scene,
                    To monarchize, be feared, and kill with looks;
                      Infusing him with self and vain conceit,
                        As if this flesh which walls about our life
                          Were brass impregnable; and humored thus,
                            Comes at the last, and with a little pin
                              Bores through his castle wall, and farewell king!
                                Cover your heads, and mock not flesh and blood
                                  With solemn reverence, Throw away respect,
                                    Tradition, form, and ceremonious duty;
                                      For you have but mistook me all this while.
                                        I live with bread like you, feel want, taste grief,
                                          Need friends. Subjected thus,
      - The Tragedy of King Richard the Second
         (King Richard at III, ii) [Death : Royalty]

Let's choose executors and talk of wills.
  And yet not so--for what can we bequeath,
    Save our deposed bodies to the ground?
      - The Tragedy of King Richard the Second
         (King Richard at III, ii) [Graves]

Let's talk of graves, of worms, and epitaphs,
  Make dust our paper, and with rainy eyes
    Write sorrow on the bosom of the earth.
      Let's choose executors and talk of wills.
        And yet not so--for what can we bequeath,
          Save our deposed bodies to the ground?
            Our lands, our lives, and all are Bolingbroke's,
              And nothing can we call our own but death
                And that small model of the barren earth
                  Which serves as past and cover to our bones.
      - The Tragedy of King Richard the Second
         (King Richard at III, ii) [Death : Epitaphs]

O, call back yesterday, did time return,
  And thou shalt have twelve thousand fighting men!
    To-day, to-day, unhappy day too late,
      O'erthrows thy joys, friends, fortune, and thy state;
        For all the Welshmen, hearing thou wert dead,
          Are gone to Bolingbroke, dispersed, and fled.
      - The Tragedy of King Richard the Second
         (Salisbury at III, ii) [Time]

To fear the foe, since fear oppresseth strength,
  Gives, in your weakness, strength unto your foe,
    And so your follies fight against yourself.
      Fear, and be slain--so worse can come to fight;
        And fight and die is death destroying death,
          Where fearing dying pays death servile breath.
      - The Tragedy of King Richard the Second
         (Carlisle at III, ii) [Fear]

Wise men ne'er wail their present woes.
      - The Tragedy of King Richard the Second
         (Carlisle at III, ii) [Proverbs]

For night owls shriek where mounting larks should sing.
      - The Tragedy of King Richard the Second
         (King Richard at III, iii) [Proverbs]

He is come to open
  The purple testament of bleeding war.
      - The Tragedy of King Richard the Second
         (King Richard at III, iii) [War]


Displaying page 171 of 186 for this author:   << Prev  Next >>  1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 128 129 130 131 132 133 134 135 136 137 138 139 140 141 142 143 144 145 146 147 148 149 150 151 152 153 154 155 156 157 158 159 160 161 162 163 164 165 166 167 168 169 170 [171] 172 173 174 175 176 177 178 179 180 181 182 183 184 185 186

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