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WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE
English dramatist and poet
(1564 - 1616)
  CHECK READING LIST (43)    << Prev Page    Displaying page 100 of 186    Next Page >> 

No, by my soul, I never in my life
  Did hear a challenge urged more modestly,
    Unless a brother should a brother dare
      To gentle exercise and proof of arms.
      - King Henry the Fourth, Part I
         (Vernon at V, ii) [Challenge]

Now for our consciences, the arms are fair,
  When the intent of bearing them is just.
      - King Henry the Fourth, Part I
         (Hotspur at V, ii) [War]

O gentlemen, the time of life is short!
  To spend that shortness basely were too long
    If life did ride upon a dial's point,
      Still ending at the arrival of an hour.
      - King Henry the Fourth, Part I
         (Hotspur at V, ii) [Life]

Supposition all our lives shall be stuck full of eyes;
  For treason is but trusted like the fox,
    Who, ne'er so tame, so cherished and locked up,
      Will have a wild trick of his ancestors.
      - King Henry the Fourth, Part I
         (Worcester at V, ii) [Treason]

But thoughts the slaves of life, and life time's fool,
  And time, that takes survey of all the world,
    Must have a stop.
      - King Henry the Fourth, Part I
         (Hotspur at V, iv) [Time]

For my part, if a lie may do thee grace,
  I'll gild it with the happiest terms I have.
      - King Henry the Fourth, Part I
         (Prince Henry at V, iv) [Lying]

I could have better spared a better man.
      - King Henry the Fourth, Part I
         (Prince Henry at V, iv) [Regret]

I'll follow, as they say, for reward. He that rewards me, God reward him. If I do grow great, I'll grow less; for I'll purge, and leave sack, and live cleanly, as a nobleman should do.
      - King Henry the Fourth, Part I
         (Falstaff at V, iv) [Cleanliness]

Ill-weaved ambition, how much art thou shrunk!
  When that this body did contain a spirit,
    A kingdom for it was too small a bound;
      But now two paces of the vilest earth
        Is room enough.
      - King Henry the Fourth, Part I
         (Prince Henry at V, iv) [Ambition]

Lord, lord, how this world is given to lying. I grant you I was down, and out of breath, and so was he; but we rose both at an instant and fought a long hour by Shrewsbury clock.
      - King Henry the Fourth, Part I
         (Falstaff at V, iv) [Lying]

Rebellion in this land shall lose his sway,
  Meeting the check of such another day;
    And since this business so fair is done,
      Let us not leave till all our own be won.
      - King Henry the Fourth, Part I
         (King Henry at V, iv)
        [Books (Last Lines) : Rebellion]

The better part of valor is discretion, in the which better part I have saved my life.
      - King Henry the Fourth, Part I
         (Falstaff at V, iv) [Discretion]

Two stars keep not their motion in one sphere,
  Nor can one England brook a double reign
    Of Harry Percy and the Prince of Wales.
      - King Henry the Fourth, Part I
         (Prince Henry at V, iv) [England : Stars]

One more word, I beseech you. If you be not too much cloyed with fat meat, our humble author will continue the story, with Sir John in it, and make you merry with fair Katharine of France. Where, for anything I know, Falstaff shall die of a sweat, unless already 'a be killed with your hard opinions, for Oldcastle died a martyr, and this is not the man. My tongue is weary. When my legs are too, I will bid you good night, and so kneel down before you, but, indeed, to pray for the queen.
      - King Henry the Fourth, Part II
         (Dancer at epilogue) [Books (Last Lines)]

In poison there is no physic.
      - King Henry the Fourth, Part II
         (Northumberland at I, i) [Proverbs]

In poison there is physic; and these news,
  Having been well, that would have made me sick,
    Being sick, have in some measure made me well.
      - King Henry the Fourth, Part II
         (Northumberland at I, i) [Medicine]

O, such a day,
  So fought, so followed, and so fairly won,
    Came not till now to dignify the times
      Since Caesar's fortunes!
      - King Henry the Fourth, Part II
         (Lord Bardolph at I, i) [Day]

Open your ears, for which of you will stop
  The vent of hearing when loud Rumor speaks?
    I, from the orient to the drooping west,
      Making the wind my post-horse, still unfold
        The acts commenced on this ball of earth.
      - King Henry the Fourth, Part II
         (Rumor at I, i) [Books (First Lines)]

Thou tremblest, and the whiteness in thy cheek
  Is apter than thy tongue to tell thy errand.
      - King Henry the Fourth, Part II
         (Northumberland at I, i) [Fear]

Yet the first bringer of unwelcome news
  Hath but a losing office, and his tongue
    Sounds ever after as a sullen bell,
      Rememb'red tolling a departing friend.
      - King Henry the Fourth, Part II
         (Northumberland at I, i) [News]

All the other gifts appertinent to man, as the malice of this age shapes them, are not worth a gooseberry.
      - King Henry the Fourth, Part II
         (Falstaff at I, ii) [Gifts]

I am as poor as Job, my lord, but not so patient.
      - King Henry the Fourth, Part II
         (Falstaff at I, ii) [Poverty]

I am not only witty in myself, but the cause that wit is in other men.
      - King Henry the Fourth, Part II
         (Falstaff at I, ii) [Wit]

The brain of this foolish compounded clay-man is not able to invent anything that intends to laughter more that I invent or is invented on me.
      - King Henry the Fourth, Part II
         (Falstaff at I, ii) [Laughter]

This apoplexy, as I take it, is a kind of lethargy, an't please your lordship, a kind of sleeping in the blood, a whoreson tingling.
      - King Henry the Fourth, Part II
         (Falstaff at I, ii) [Disease]


Displaying page 100 of 186 for this author:   << Prev  Next >>  1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 [100] 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 128 129 130 131 132 133 134 135 136 137 138 139 140 141 142 143 144 145 146 147 148 149 150 151 152 153 154 155 156 157 158 159 160 161 162 163 164 165 166 167 168 169 170 171 172 173 174 175 176 177 178 179 180 181 182 183 184 185 186

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