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WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE
English dramatist and poet
(1564 - 1616)
  CHECK READING LIST (43)    << Prev Page    Displaying page 162 of 186    Next Page >> 

Thou almost mak'st me waver in my faith--
  To hold opinion with Pythagoras
    That souls of animals infuse themselves
      Into the trunks of men.
      - The Merchant of Venice (Gratiano at IV, i)
        [Faith]

Thyself shalt see the act;
  For, as thou urgest justice, be assured
    Thou shalt have justice more than thou desir'st.
      - The Merchant of Venice (Portia at IV, i)
        [Justice]

We do pray for mercy,
  And that same prayer doth teach us all to render
    The deeds of mercy.
      - The Merchant of Venice (Portia at IV, i)
        [Mercy : Proverbs]

We turned o'er many books together.
      - The Merchant of Venice (Clerk at IV, i)
        [Books]

What! would'st thou have a serpent sting thee twice?
      - The Merchant of Venice (Shylock at IV, i)
        [Proverbs]

What, wouldst thou have a serpent sting thee twice?
      - The Merchant of Venice (Shylock at IV, i)
        [Ingratitude]

Why, this bond is forfeit;
  And lawfully by this the Jew may claim
    A pound of flesh, to be by him cut off
      Nearest the merchant's heart.
      - The Merchant of Venice (Portia at IV, i)
        [Justice]

You cannot better be employed, Bassanio,
  Than to live still, and write mine epitaph.
      - The Merchant of Venice (Antonio at IV, i)
        [Epitaphs]

You have among you many a purchased slave,
  Which like your asses and your dogs and mules
    You use is abject and in slavish parts,
      Because you bought them.
      - The Merchant of Venice (Shylock at IV, i)
        [Slavery]

A substitute shines brightly as a king
  Until a king be by, and then his state
    Empties itself, as dot an inland brook
      Into the main of waters.
      - The Merchant of Venice (Portia at V, i)
        [Royalty]

For by these blessed candles of the night,
  Had you bee there I think you would have begged
    The ring of me to give the worthy doctor.
      - The Merchant of Venice (Bassanio at V, i)
        [Stars]

How far that little candle throws its beams;
  So shines a good deed in a naughty world.
      - The Merchant of Venice (Portia at V, i)
        [Proverbs]

How many things by season seasoned are
  To their right praise and true perfection!
      - The Merchant of Venice (Portia at V, i)
        [Perfection]

How sweet the moonlight sleeps upon this bank!
  Here will we sit and let the sounds of music
    Creep in our ears; soft stillness and the night
      Become the touches of sweet harmony.
        Sit, Jessica. Look how the floor of heaven
          Is thick inlaid with patens of bright gold.
            There's not the smallest orb which thou behold'st
              But in his motion like an angel sings,
                Still quiring to the young-eyed cherubins;
                  Such harmony is in immortal souls,
                    But whilst this muddy vesture of decay
                      Doth grossly close it in, we cannot hear it.
      - The Merchant of Venice (Lorenzo at V, i)
        [Music]

In such a night
  Did Thisbe fearfully o'ertrip the dew,
    And saw the lion's shadow ere himself,
      And ran dismayed away.
      - The Merchant of Venice (Jessica at V, i)
        [Medicine]

Let me give light, but let me not be light,
  For a light wife doth make a heavy husband,
    And never be Bassanio so for me.
      - The Merchant of Venice (Portia at V, i)
        [Wives]

Look how the floor of heaven
  Is thick inlaid with patens of bright gold.
    There's not the smallest orb which thou behold'st
      But in his motion like an angel sings,
        Still quiring to the young-eyed cherubins;
          Such harmony is in immortal souls,
            But whilst this muddy vesture decay
              Both grossly close it in, we cannot hear it.
      - The Merchant of Venice (Lorenzo at V, i)
        [Stars]

(Nerissa:) When the moon shone we did not see the candle.
  (Portia:) So doth the greater glory dim less.
      - The Merchant of Venice
         (Nerissa & Portia at V, i) [Glory]

(Portia:) A quarrel ho! already! What's the matter?
  (Gratiano:) About a hoop of gold, a paltry ring
    That she did give me, whose posy was
      For all the world like cutler's poetry
        Upon a knife--'Love me, and leave me not.'
      - The Merchant of Venice
         (Portia & Gratiano at V, i) [Gold : Jewels]

Sir, you are very welcome to our house.
  It must appear in other ways than words;
    Therefore I scant this breathing courtesy.
      - The Merchant of Venice (Portia at V, i)
        [Welcome]

Tell him there's a post come from my master, with his horn full of good news.
      - The Merchant of Venice (Launcelot at V, i)
        [Post]

That light we see is burning in my hall;
  How far that little candle throws his beams!
    So shines a good deed in a naughty world.
      - The Merchant of Venice (Portia at V, i)
        [Deeds]

The crow doth sing as sweetly as the lark
  When neither is attended; and I think
    The nightingale, if she should sing by day
      When every goose is cackling, would be thought
        No better a musician than the wren.
          How many thing by season seasoned are
            To their right praise and true perfection!
      - The Merchant of Venice (Portia at V, i)
        [Crows : Nightingales]

The man that hath no music in himself,
  Nor is not moved with concord of sweet sounds,
    Is fit for treasons, stratagems, and spoils;
      The motions of his spirit are dull as night,
        And his affections dark as Erebus.
      - The Merchant of Venice (Lorenzo at V, i)
        [Music]

Therefore the poet
  Did feign that Orpheus drew trees, stones, and floods;
    Since naught so stockish, hard, and full of rage
      But music for the time doth change his nature.
      - The Merchant of Venice (Lorenzo at V, i)
        [Music]


Displaying page 162 of 186 for this author:   << Prev  Next >>  1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 128 129 130 131 132 133 134 135 136 137 138 139 140 141 142 143 144 145 146 147 148 149 150 151 152 153 154 155 156 157 158 159 160 161 [162] 163 164 165 166 167 168 169 170 171 172 173 174 175 176 177 178 179 180 181 182 183 184 185 186

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