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WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE
English dramatist and poet
(1564 - 1616)
  CHECK READING LIST (43)    << Prev Page    Displaying page 143 of 186    Next Page >> 

My master and his man are both broke loose,
  Beaten the maids a-row and bound the doctor,
    Whose beard they have singed off with brands of fire;
      And ever as it blazed they threw on him
        Great pails of puddled mire to quench the hair.
          My master preaches patience to him, and the while
            His man with scissors nicks him like a fool;
              And sure, unless you send some present help,
                Between them they will kill the conjurer.
      - The Comedy of Errors (Messenger at V, i)
        [Barber]

Nay, then, thus:
  We came into the world like brother and brother;
    And now let's go hand in hand, not one before another.
      - The Comedy of Errors
         (Dromio of Ephesus at V, i)
        [Books (Last Lines)]

O, grief hath changed me since you saw me last,
  And careful hours, with Time's deformed hand,
    Have written strange defeatures in my face.
      - The Comedy of Errors (Egeon at V, i)
        [Grief]

Sweet recreation barred, what doth ensue
  But moody and dull melancholy,
    Kinsman to a grim and comfortless despair,
      And at her heels a huge infectious troop
        Of pale distemperatures and foes to life?
      - The Comedy of Errors (Lady Abbess at V, i)
        [Misery]

Thou say'st his meat was sauced with thy upbradings;
  Unquiet meals make ill digestions;
    Thereof the raging fire of fever bred.
      - The Comedy of Errors (Lady Abbess at V, i)
        [Eating]

Though now this grained face of mine be hid
  In sap-consuming winter's drizzled snow,
    And all the conduits of my blood froze up,
      Yet hath my night of life some memory,
        My wasting lamps some fading glimmer left,
          My dull deaf ears a little use to hear.
      - The Comedy of Errors (Egeon at V, i) [Age]

He that will have a cake out of the wheat must tarry the grinding.
  Have I not tarried?
    Ay, the grinding; but you must tarry the bolting.
      Have I not tarried?
        Ay, the bolting; but you must tarry the leavening.
          Still have I tarried.
            Ay, to the leavening; but here's yet in the word 'hereafter' the
             kneading, the making of the cake, the heating of the oven, and
             the baking; nay, you must stay the cooling too, or you may chance
             to burn your lips.
      - The History of Troilus and Cressida
         (Pandarus & Troilus at I, i) [Cookery]

Her eyes, her hair, her cheek, her gait, her voice;
  Handlest in thy discourse, O, that her hand,
    In whose comparison all whites are ink,
      Writing their own reproach; to whose soft seizure
        The cygnet's down is harsh, and spirit of sense
          Hard as the palm of ploughman.
      - The History of Troilus and Cressida
         (Troilus at I, i) [Hand]

I have had my labor for my travail; ill-thought-on of her, and ill-thought-on of you; gone between and between, but small thanks for my labor.
      - The History of Troilus and Cressida
         (Pandarus at I, i) [Labor : Work]

I was about to tell thee, when my heart,
  As wedged with a sigh, would rive in twain,
    Lest Hector or my father should perceive me:
      I have, as when the sun doth light a-scorn,
        Buried this sigh in wrinkle of a smile;
          But sorrow, that is couched in seeming gladness,
            Is like that mirth fate turns to sudden sadness.
      - The History of Troilus and Cressida
         (Troilus at I, i) [Sorrow]

Alas poor chin, many a wart is richer.
      - The History of Troilus and Cressida
         (Cressida at I, ii) [Hair]

If you love an addle egg as well as you love an idle head, you would eat chickens i' th' shell.
      - The History of Troilus and Cressida
         (Cressida at I, ii) [Eating]

Yet hold I off: women are angels, wooing;
  Things won are done, joy's soul lies in the doing.
    That she beloved knows nought that knows not this:
      Men prize the thing ungained more than it is:
        That she was never yet, that ever knew
          Love got so sweet as when desire did sue.
      - The History of Troilus and Cressida
         (Cressida at I, ii) [Wooing]

And, like a strutting player, whose conceit
  Lies in his hamstring, and doth think it rich
    To hear the wooden dialogue and sound
      'Twixt his stretch footing and the scaffoldage,
        Such to-be-pitied and o'er-wrested seeming
          He acts thy greatness in; . . .
      - The History of Troilus and Cressida
         (Ulysses at I, iii) [Acting]

For in her ray and brightness
  The herd hath more annoyance by the breese
    Than by the tiger; but when the splitting wind
      Makes flexible the knees of knotted oaks,
        And flies fled under shade, why then the thing of courage,
          As roused with rage, with rage doth sympathize,
            And with an accent turned in self-same key
              Returns to chiding fortune.
      - The History of Troilus and Cressida
         (Nestor at I, iii) [Courage]

For the success,
  Although particular, shall give a scantling
    Of good or bad unto the general;
      And in such indexes, although small pricks
        To their subsequent volumes, there is seen
          The baby figure of the giant mass
            Of things to come at large.
      - The History of Troilus and Cressida
         (Nestor at I, iii) [Books : Indexes]

I ask, that I might waken reverence,
  And bid the cheek be ready with a blush
    Modest as morning when she coldly eyes
      The youthful Phoebus,
        Which is that god in office, guiding men?
      - The History of Troilus and Cressida
         (Aeneas at I, iii) [Blushes]

Take but degree away, untune that string,
  And hark what discord follows.
      - The History of Troilus and Cressida
         (Ulysses at I, iii) [Music]

The general's disdained
  By him one step below, he by the next,
    The next by him beneath; so every step,
      Exampled by the first pace that is sick
        Of his superior, grows to an envious fever
          Of pale and bloodless emulation:
            And 'tis this fever that keeps Troy on foot,
              Not her own sinews.
      - The History of Troilus and Cressida
         (Ulysses at I, iii) [Envy]

The heavens themselves, the planets, and this centre
  Observe degree, priority, and place,
    Insisture, course, proportion, season, form,
      Office, and custom, in all line of order.
      - The History of Troilus and Cressida
         (Ulysses at I, iii) [Order]

With him Patroclus
  Upon a lazy bed the livelong day
    Breaks scurril jests,
      And with ridiculous and silly action,
        (Which, slanderer, he imitation calls)
          He pageants us.
      - The History of Troilus and Cressida
         (Ulysses at I, iii) [Awkwardness]

I take to-day a wife, and my election
  Is led on in the conduct of my will--
    My will enkindled my by mine and ears
      Two traded pilots 'twixt the dangerous shores
        Of will and judgment.
      - The History of Troilus and Cressida
         (Troilus at II, ii) [Will]

The reasons you allege do more conduce
  To the hot passion of distemp'red blood
    Than to make up a free determination
      'Twixt right and wrong, for pleasure and revenge
        Have ears more deaf than adders to the voice
          Of any true decision.
      - The History of Troilus and Cressida
         (Hector at II, ii) [Decision]

The wound of peace is surety,
  Surety secure; but modest doubt is called
    The beacon of the wise, the tent that searches
      To th' bottom of the worst.
      - The History of Troilus and Cressida
         (Hector at II, ii) [Doubt : Wounds]

A stirring dwarf we do allowance give
  Before a sleeping giant.
      - The History of Troilus and Cressida
         (Agamemnon at II, iii) [Consideration]


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